Question about butter in Canada the sizes offered

@suspenseful (40314)
Canada
March 20, 2010 9:50am CST
When I go to a United States cooking site, I see they can get butter in 1/4 lb. sections already wrapped just as we get our margarine here in Canada (the no name and cheap lots of transfat added still come in the large boxes or the l lb rectangle. But the only sizes we get our butter in is the l lb (or metric equivalent) and the 1/2 lb and that is also the expensive brands. That makes it a bit hard for cooking, and also a bit more easy for temptation since well if it came in 1/4 sections or 1/2 c sizes, you could just take out one section for cooking or as a spread and put the rest away. And unless one has a scale, one might cut a bit more then 1/2 c or 1/4 lb because not everyone cuts straight. So why do they not offer butter here in Canada in sections the way they do in the States?
4 people like this
8 responses
@Lakota12 (42681)
• United States
20 Mar 10
out getting a little more when cutting on your own guess ya could get measuring tape and measre if you are worried about it!
1 person likes this
@suspenseful (40314)
• Canada
21 Mar 10
That does seem a little silly. I use a kitchen scale, but that is because I am part English and they always used kitchen scales to measure everything over there. I think that way was much better.
@Lakota12 (42681)
• United States
21 Mar 10
either way will work
1 person likes this
@suspenseful (40314)
• Canada
6 Apr 10
The weighing is much better. With me not being able to draw a straight line, let alone cut it, the former would work best.
@Lindalinda (4112)
• Canada
23 Mar 10
You should look a little closer.Please do not generalize. You can certainly find find butter in Canada already cut in 1/4 sections and wrapped individually. You can also find butter in 1/2 lb packages. Look at the the more expensive butters and you will see it. The least expensive butter, Neilson's in Toronto comes in 1 lb sizes but at the sides of the wrapping the 1/2, 1/4 sections and tbsp. are indicated by a line so you can cut it. Also check out ready made garlic butter. It comes in 1/4 lb sections (metric equivalent)
1 person likes this
@suspenseful (40314)
• Canada
23 Mar 10
You are talking to a not that straight cutter. I know that our butter comes in lines on the package that tells where you can cut. I also know that I can go and buy an individual 1/4 lb size that would be 1/4 the cost of a regular 1 lb size. What I am interested in is a 1 lb box of butter like they have in margarine where you can open the package and take out a 1/4 section. No wonder things do not change here in Canada, it is the same oh same oh "it really does not matter," but for someone who is straight line challenged and has to get out her kitchen scale to see if he butter is exactly the correct amount, it does matter. Oh and Neilson's is not the cheapest. Go to Walmart.
• Canada
8 Apr 10
I am glad things are the way they are in Canada. Anyway, I really don't see your problem at all. If you are not a straight cutter, line up an implement such as a cutting board against the butter and cut straight along that line. With all due respect to Americans, they are some of the biggest wasters of resources in the world so we should not follow their example. Think of all the aluminum foil and cardboard that is needed to package those sticks of butter. Who needs it?
• Australia
23 Mar 10
I'm not sure if it is available where you are, but the old fashioned blocks of butter here in Australia come with markings on the outside that are designed to help you know a quantity. It makes it easier to know how much you require (approximately) for a recipe, and how much you are going to have left. Butter and margerine in tubs is harder know, but a good set of kitchen scales will help with weight amounts.
1 person likes this
@suspenseful (40314)
• Canada
23 Mar 10
We get the old fashioned with the lines on the foil. You are talking about a not so straight cutter and I do use kitchen scales. I find it much easier. The trouble is that when it comes to the 1 or 2 tbspoon size and those little lines on the scale. They are not that easy to see if you are not near=sighted. We do not get butter in tubes, at least I have not seen any except for the kind that is mixed with olive oil to make it softer and usually I guess what to use then. But if I want to make the recipe exactly I use the regular butter. However if I am expecting company and want to give them something nice like butter for the buns instead of margarine, I want to take out 1/4 stick instead of a whole lb. It would be easier.
@chrislotz (8203)
• Canada
21 Mar 10
We have 1/4 lb size of butter here in canada too. I buy mine at co-op. I live in Calgary and I know you live in Winnipeg so I am sure you can buy it too. I do agree with you that butter is redicuously expensive and I only buy it for baking and for the odd time I have popcorn with melted butter on it. I buy the 1/4 pound ones because most of my baking recipes ask for that size so it just makes my baking that much easier.
1 person likes this
@suspenseful (40314)
• Canada
22 Mar 10
We shop at Superstore and that is where the friends who drive us there shop. I have not been to the Co-op yet. I believe that you get things cheaper if you have a membership, but I will see if the quarter lbs are offered there. I do not want then sold separately, but what I want is to have the butter sold in 1 lb or equivalent cut into 1/4 lb packages. that is what they do in the States.
@barehugs (8985)
• Canada
21 Mar 10
Ok, I like to bake bread in the USA and in Canada too. 1/4 cup butter is the same as 4 TBS. But I prefer virgin olive oil, instead of butter, but either will do. I often add an extra TBS of oil to the recipe, as I find it keeps the bread from drying out. AS far as I can determine there is no advantage to using butter over oil, and oil is much easier to measure no matter what country you are baking in.
1 person likes this
@suspenseful (40314)
• Canada
21 Mar 10
I make pizza with olive oil, but well if I am making shortbread, I prefer butter over margerine, and butter is better for company then using margarine. But still the same would it not be easier for us in Canada to get butter the same way they package Parkay margarine in sections and then we can freeze the rest and instead of taking off 1/2 lb or 3/4 lb and hoping the knife is sharp enough, to just take out the amount we need. After all, butter is expensive up here that the only time I get it is when it is on sale and then it is mostly for company, spreading on bread, recipes that only call for butter, and for toppings on waffles and even those i do not like making that often.
• United States
21 Mar 10
If "control" is the issue, freeze the large amounts, keeping out only small amounts at a time. To be honest, it makes it easy to use/cut that way too. Use fishing line to cut the butter/margarine into slices that are what you desire. I'm not really sure I understand your question fully but I hope this helps!
@suspenseful (40314)
• Canada
21 Mar 10
I do freeze the large amounts. It is just that I am not that good at cutting straight. Why I am terrible at drawing them as well, so you see my problem. It is just that it is easier if it were in smaller pieces and if you freeze the large chunks what happens if you need some for baking or company, you have to take that whole chunk as well. I was wondering whether dental floss would work just as well as fishing line or is it a bit too weak?
@deebomb (15319)
• United States
20 Mar 10
Years ago we cooked with a lot of crisco shorting. and it came in 3 lb. cans. We would measure it by putting the amount of water (1/4 cup water for 1/4 cup shorting then add the shorting until we had 1/2 cup of both) You could do the same with the butter and since each stick equals 1/2 cup or 1/4 lb, you measure 1 cup water then add butter until you have the water hitting the 2 cup line giving you 1 cup butter. I know this doesn't answer your quest but it might help with getting the right amount of butter. better yet use a good olive oil. It's a lot healthier. http://whatscookingamerica.net/OliveOil.htm
@Hatley (164266)
• Garden Grove, California
20 Mar 10
hi suspenseful I learn something new here everyday. I did not know that they don't offer butter in the 1/4 lb. sections in Canada like they do here in the US. I can see where that would make it a hassle in cooking and too one would be tempted to use more than is necessary. I guess I just assumed since we are just borders apart that thing like this would be the same in Canada as here in the states. I did keep a scales as I am a diabetic and find sometimes I need to weigh to be sure I m not taking more than I should. I have been mandated by my doctor yesterday to cut down on what I am eating as he would rather not have to increase the dosage on my diabetes medication. He said as I have alot of90 readings he doesnt want to increase what I take. So its up to me to cut back. I would think it would be to the advantage of the butter companies to make it easier for their customers to use their products.
@suspenseful (40314)
• Canada
21 Mar 10
I also have a kitchen scale that I picked up in the thrift store, but it is mostly in pounds and metric and not in cups so unless you realize that 1/2 lb equals 1 cup you run into problems. The trouble is that the foil wrap around the butter is marked into `1 c, 1/2 cs, and 1/4 cups and the foil s so flimsy that it tears easy so you actually have to unwrap the whole thing, find out where to slice and then I usually wind up weighing it on the scale. And if you just want 1 tbsp you do have a bit of a problem there. Yet butter here is so expensive and especially the unsalted kind.