Why can't used car dealers be honest?

United States
March 15, 2013 12:32pm CST
I recently purchased a minivan after 6 months without a car. We had a low budget to spend on a vehicle, so I knew I would have to purchase and older one which wouldn't be covered under Lemon Laws. When I went I talk to the dealer I asked him flat out, are there any problems I should know about. He stated there are no problems and the car runs great. Two days later I broke down on the highway. Why can't these dealers let you know the car has problems. I might have still purchased the vehicle if he disclosed that it needed some repairs, but because of his lie I had to spend twice the repair cost because I didn't have an option to get estimates from mechanics. Instead I was caught in an emergency situation with no alternative but to pay whatever the mechanic charged.
2 people like this
6 responses
@lelin1123 (15627)
• Puerto Rico
15 Mar 13
That is terrible and I so agree with you. When you are walking into a used car dealer you see nothing but con artist in many cases. At least that is my opinion. I have to say though we brought a used Chevy 4X4 truck back at least 10 years ago for 6,000 dollars. I was so nervous about handing over $6,000 dollars in cash to a used car dealer. However, we lucked out. We still have the truck and have gotten so much use out of it. Parts of course have had to be replaced but that is due to rare and tear. If I were you I would go back to the dealer and tell them exactly what you stated here. "Why can't you guys be honest and tell me what problems the minivan really had. Explain what happened to you and how it cost you more money to fix because you were not aware to begin with. Then I will tell them "You lost a customer for good and I will tell others not to come here."
• United States
15 Mar 13
If I believed it would make a difference, I probably would. Instead I opted to give them a bad review online. Hopefully I can keep another person from being taken by this guy. My van is still running, but as it is I could have probably bought a more expensive vehicle and gotten covered by the Lemon Laws. Sometime the great deal, really isn't a deal at all.
1 person likes this
@lelin1123 (15627)
• Puerto Rico
15 Mar 13
Well a bad review online is good. However, I believe going to the person who sold you the minivan face to face and telling him how you feel is very embarrassing especially when you tell them "I'm telling everyone I know not to shop here" that might make a difference on how he sales the next car. Or just go to the manager and explain your story. Maybe he will give you some money back for your troubles. I know I would be giving them a piece of my mind to the point they would have wished I had never walked into their store. Anyway, good luck and hope the minivan does not give you anymore trouble.
• United States
16 Mar 13
The sad part was we paid $40 to do a Carfsx, and the vehicle history was perfect. We really thought we had a good deal.
@inertia4 (28164)
• United States
19 Mar 13
I don't know of any car salesmen that are honest. I would have taken that car right back to the dealer that I bought it and throw the keys in his face and force him to give the money back. As a matter of fact I did that years ago. I had bought a Buick Century, I had the car for like a week and then it started stalling every other block I drove. I got fed up and went back to the used car lot I bought it from. I threatened him and threw the keys in his face. He then told me he cannot give the money back, then I went off. So I picked out a used Caddy and said, I will take this car and you will get no more money from me. He agreed and that was that.
• United States
20 Mar 13
If I thought I could get away with that, I would totally do it. I'm afraid I'd probably wind up getting arrested as my temper is uncontrollable once I let loose. Did the Caddy work out better?
1 person likes this
@inertia4 (28164)
• United States
27 Mar 13
I hear you on that one. Yes the Caddy worked out way better. But I wound up getting rid of it a few months later because my cousin came to me with MotorTrend magazine. In that issue was an article about Ford and Lincoln. They said that Ford was changing the MarkVI to the MarkVII. I saw the pictures of the VII and I did not like it. So I had some money saved up and I traded the caddy in for a brand new MarkVI and I was on cloud nine after that. It was great to be young.
@MoonGypsy (4609)
• United States
15 Mar 13
that really sucks. this is why i am afraid to buy my first car. my husband doesn't really know anything about buying one himself.
• United States
16 Mar 13
My advice is if you are buying used find a car under 100,000 miles and less than 10 years old. Most states require the dealer to fix any problems if the car meets those conditions.
@maximax8 (31142)
• United Kingdom
15 Mar 13
Few car dealers are honest which is a great shame. It was miserable the second haand mini van broke down on the highway and you had to act in that emergency situation. It was a pity that a mechanic had to work on your mini van so soon after you bought it. I bought a second hand car in 2006. The dealer said a lady did part exchange with another dealer and he had sold the car to him. It had a very low millage which pleased me. One of the garage employees took me out for a drive in that car. I was a learner driver at that time so I used the car for extra driving practice. My driving instructor said he must drive the car to get a feel for it. The car failed on him and it was such a weird experience. He was the one that looked like the learner driver. I am delighted to say that I finally passed my practical driving test in 2010. I still have that same car. I am saving up to buy a second hand car with a ramp for my son's wheelchair.
• United States
15 Mar 13
It seems like the car always breaks down at the worst possible time. I guess it all goes along with the memories we have of our vehicles. It's good you got the car running again.
@lampar (7587)
• United States
15 Mar 13
It is part of the nature of used car business, if the dealer and salesman tell you that their used cars are full of problems and are going to give you plenty of headache some where down the road, i bet no customers including yourself is going to pay several thousand of dollars for it, at the end of the day, they will have no single deals to close if they are to be honest about their used cars. Whenever i decide to buy a used car, i can reasonably expect no honest full disclosure from the dealer and its salesman, i will take it for a test drive and to my mechanic for an evaluated personal opinion before i even commit to buy their used cars. I assume it is within a reasonable expectation not to believe used car dealers to be fully honest and outright with their used cars' mechanical problem, while attempting to sell you a defected car. In many occasion, a used car salesman will prefer to keep it a private matter than letting you known, it is not that hard to understand the underlying reason.
• United States
15 Mar 13
I must be getting old then, because it used to be when a man gave you his word it was something you could count on. The fact is I'm the type of person who likes to crunch the numbers. If I can purchase a fixer upper for a good price, I don't mind putting some money into it to have a decent running car. A bit of disclosure on the dealers part would have saved me significant repair cost, to me he should be held liable for it, but of course the law is on his side. I will however not be referring any future business his way, and will bad mout his business every chance I get.
• India
4 Apr 13
i am sorry to hear that but there are people who just think for their income and for that they used to say lies and just pass away to get their money.. wish if they could accept honesty and responsibility in their work.