What happen to Judas the traitor?

@wapewe (173)
April 17, 2013 4:54am CST
After His wickedness, what happen with Judas? Also, what happen with the money as the payment that he received for his wickedness?
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5 responses
@1hopefulman (45127)
• Canada
18 Apr 13
What happened to Judas and the money is mentioned here: Matthew 27:3-10 (NWT) 3?Then Judas, who betrayed him, seeing he had been condemned, felt remorse and turned the thirty silver pieces back to the chief priests and older men, 4?saying: “I sinned when I betrayed righteous blood.” They said: “What is that to us? You must see to that!” 5?So he threw the silver pieces into the temple and withdrew, and went off and hanged himself. 6?But the chief priests took the silver pieces and said: “It is not lawful to drop them into the sacred treasury, because they are the price of blood.” 7?After consulting together, they bought with them the potter’s field to bury strangers. 8?Therefore that field has been called “Field of Blood” to this very day. 9?Then what was spoken through Jeremiah the prophet was fulfilled, saying: “And they took the thirty silver pieces, the price upon the man that was priced, the one on whom some of the sons of Israel set a price, 10?and they gave them for the potter’s field, according to what Jehovah had commanded me.”
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@1hopefulman (45127)
• Canada
19 Apr 13
I did a search and found this explanation: "Combining the two accounts [Matthew 27:5; Acts 1:18], it appears that Judas tried to hang himself over some cliff, but the rope or tree limb broke so that he plunged down and burst open on the rocks below. The topography around Jerusalem makes such an event conceivable. The answer seems to be that the priests purchased the field, but since Judas provided the money, it could be credited to him. Dr. A. Edersheim pointed out: “It was not lawful to take into the Temple-treasury, for the purchase of sacred things, money that had been unlawfully gained. In such cases the Jewish Law provided that the money was to be restored to the donor, and, if he insisted on giving it, that he should be induced to spend it for something for the public weal [well-being]. . . . By a fiction of law the money was still considered to be Judas’, and to have been applied by him in the purchase of the well-known ‘potter’s field.’” (The Life and Times of Jesus the Messiah, 1906, Vol. II, p. 575)" http://wol.jw.org/en/wol/d/r1/lp-e/1200002541
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• United States
18 Apr 13
We do have to give Judas credit for trying to undo what he did. All the other disciples deserted JEsus.
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@wapewe (173)
19 Apr 13
In Mathew 27:5 (So Judas threw the money into the temple and left. Then he went away and hanged himself.) But in Acts 1:18 (With the payment he received for his wickedness, Judas bought a field; there he fell headlong, his body burst open and all his intestines spilled out.) Which one the answer?
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17 Apr 13
he was bothered by his conscience that he didnt enjoy the price he got from betraying Jesus he lived in regrets that he decided to take his own life because of fear that Jesus will not forgive him
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• United States
18 Apr 13
I figured someone would know this so I read the post that were here first.
@wapewe (173)
19 Apr 13
But other verses told that He hanged Himself. Which one was the truth?
• United States
19 Apr 13
I believe he hung himself but I don't know what happened to the money.
@JohnRok1 (2051)
19 Apr 13
According to Matthew he threw it down in the temple before going and suffocating (with or without a rope). The temple authorities used it to buy the Potter's Field as a field to bury strangers in. Peter in Acts tells us that the Jerusalem locals called it "Field of Blood", "Hakeldama" in their local dialect of Aramaic (spelt in the Greek without the "H", because the Hebrew/Aramaic "he" is transliterated into Greek as a soft breathing) - I think he might have got some satisfaction out of referring to Jerusalem Aramaic as "their own dialect", after having been told "Thy speech bewrayeth thee". There is still an area in Jerusalem called "Hakeldema".
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@JohnRok1 (2051)
22 Apr 13
Sarah, I didn't think you needed to assure us that you don't know what happened to the money, because I didn't think anyone was accusing you of taking it, but it seems now Wapewe is! Tell us honestly now, Sarah, am I wrong, in reality you took the money and it finished up @Sarah, as Wapewe seems to believe? Now Wapewe, seriously. You don't tell us where you are from or what your first language is, but I suspect it may not be a Semitic language like Arabic or Tigrinya, because if it were, I wouldn't expect you to be asking this question. Repetition doesn't seem to bother Semitic language writers or speakers - Read Numbers 7:10-84, I think I could write down exactly the same information in less than one tenth of the space! But such repetition carries a message to them that the rest of us may not always pick up - In this latter case it may be saying that God takes just as much notice of what is said and done the zillionth time it is said and done as He did the first time. Certainly God is no more bored by repetition than He is stimulated by our greatest originalities. So why shouldn't material in a historic book like II Kings be repeated word for word in the prophecy of an individual prophet like Isaiah?
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@wapewe (173)
21 Apr 13
@sarah I believe? Seem that you aren't so sure? @john why the bible have many different on writing "the word of God"? Not like these both book? II Kings 19 and Isaiah 37.
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@dlr297 (5409)
• United States
18 Apr 13
"And throwing down the pieces of silver into the temple, he departed, and he went and hanged himself." Judas never spent the silver he got..when he realized what he did he through it to the ground in the temple. Then he hung himself. The silver was picked up and it was used to help the poor.
• United States
18 Apr 13
IT helped the poor by the priest buying a grave yard for them.
• United States
20 Apr 13
I don't really have an explanation for the constrictions about who spent the money but apparently why he fell headlong was because the branch he hung himself on broke.
@wapewe (173)
19 Apr 13
In Matthew yes, but take a look in Acts 1:18 "With the payment he received for his wickedness, Judas bought a field; there he fell headlong, his body burst open and all his intestines spilled out."
@JohnRok1 (2051)
18 Apr 13
There is an apparent mismatch between Matthew's account and the account in Acts. Everything that Matthew tells us happened is what actually happened, although the phrase translated "went and hanged himself" can also be translated simply "went and suffocated" (see Matthew Henry's Commentary). The Acts passage, however, may be what Peter was saying to the other apostles at the time before the Holy Spirit had been sent, and, therefore, only part of the story; in particular, for instance, his statement that Judas had bought the field, whereas in fact, it was the temple authorities that had bought the field with Judas's money (There is still an area in Jerusalem called Hakeldema or Hakl-ed-damm by the Syriac and the Arabs. The name is interesting: There is a definite article in the Aramaic, but not in the Greek used to translate it, indicating an adjectival noun: "Field of Blood" is primarily its nature and only secondarily its name). However, we have no reason to doubt that following Judas's suffocation, whether by his own hand or God's hand, his body suffered further destruction and he burst asunder in the midst, etc. The traditional interpretation is that when he hanged himself the rope broke, he fell down, burst asunder in the midst and his bowels gushed out. It may be this interpretation that "inspired" the medieval method of executing a traitor, who would be hung drawn and quartered (Look up the details on the internet, if you're interested). As for Judas's soul, there is no doubt that he went "to his own place", hell, from whence he will be brought to be reunited with his body to face the judgement of God and eternal torment, spiritual and bodily.
@JohnRok1 (2051)
19 Apr 13
I think I demonstrated that the sections of the two accounts of Judas's end that were definite statements of Scripture rather than reported fallible speech contain no contradiction. As regards your latest example the verbal wordings are slightly different. In the first passage, a careful translation of the last clause is It contained (or held) two thousand baths. In the second passage, however, it is It received and contained (or held) three thousand baths (and this could include the meaning It could receive and contain three thousand baths). Thus the first passage refers to its content when in everyday use (as described by Hiram - Two thirds filling of a bath tub is more than generous), whereas the second refers to what it could, and perhaps on occasion did contain when deliberately filled nearly to overflowing, possibly echoing Solomon's original instructions to Hiram. I'm afraid I haven't the energy to take the time to try to find out where else this resolution can be found. I am sure there are valid explanations for all apparent contradictions in Scripture (which are increased in translations that are overly loose).
@JohnRok1 (2051)
19 Apr 13
I wonder just how many people will refuse to believe on Christ because of apparent contradictions in the Bible, will on the Day of Judgement have each one of these claimed contradictions patiently demolished to their entire satisfaction and then be asked "Why did you remain in your sins? Why didn't you believe on Me and be saved?". What will they answer? However, I think it is worth finding and answering some apparent contradictions here and now to the glory of God. Seeing answers like these will leave people with even greater condemnation if they then refuse to believe on Christ.
@wapewe (173)
19 Apr 13
So it mean that there are any error or mis-writing on bible? Many verses have the same error like that. Like in I Kings 7:26 "It was a handbreadth [d] in thickness, and its rim was like the rim of a cup, like a lily blossom. It held two thousand baths." and II Chron 4:5 "It was a handbreadth [e] in thickness, and its rim was like the rim of a cup, like a lily blossom. It held three thousand baths."