Lose ---- Loose --- ahhhhh

@Mavic123456 (22024)
Thailand
April 24, 2013 6:22am CST
LOSE OR LOOSE For Non-native speakers like me we always interchange the words LOSE and LOOSE. I have read in my discussions and article the interchanging use of it. Anyway, Why? Basically because the pronunciation is ALMOST the same, thus, most of us sometimes learn through hearing. LOSE is the opposite of win. It could also be defined as missing from one’s possession or from a normal place. It can also mean suffer, deprivation and defeat. Past tense is LOST While, LOOSE means setting free or too much space. It is opposite of tight. It is an adjective.
2 people like this
6 responses
@dpk262006 (58701)
• Delhi, India
24 Apr 13
I would say neither lose your patience nor loose your purse strings, if you want to succeed in life.
1 person likes this
@owlwings (44065)
• Cambridge, England
24 Apr 13
That is a good aphorism!
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@Mavic123456 (22024)
• Thailand
24 Apr 13
hahaha that's very nice dpk.... I will keep that in mind
1 person likes this
@kalav56 (11465)
• India
24 Apr 13
Well said Deepak!
1 person likes this
@owlwings (44065)
• Cambridge, England
24 Apr 13
There is a big difference (to the English ear) between |looz| and |loos|. Unfortunately, the spelling is confusing and many people (even English writers who should know better) habitually or occasionally miss out the extra 'o'. Lose is a verb and is pronounced with a 'z' sound at the end the 'oo' sound is also very slightly longer than the 'oo' sound of 'loose'. It DOES rhyme with 'booze', 'choose' and 'zoos'. It does NOT rhyme with 'dose', 'close' (the adjective and noun rather than the verb). Related words are 'lost' (the past particple) and 'loss' (the noun), both of which have a short 'o' sound. Loose performs duty as an adjective, a noun (in the idiom 'on the loose') and a verb (meaning 'to set free'). The 'oo' sound is rather short (but not as short as the similar sound in 'put' and 'foot') and the word (even in the present and past participles - 'loosing' and 'loosed') always has an 's' sound. Mention of the word 'close' above reminds me that this is another confusing word with two different ways of pronouncing it. When it is a verb (as in 'Please close the door.' or 'The shop is now closed') it is pronounced |cl?uz| (with a 'z' sound at the end); when it is an adjective meaning 'nearby' or a noun referring to a street or a piece of land which is fenced round ('closed off'), it is pronounced |cl?us| (with an 's' sound). The vowel is the same as that in 'go', 'show', 'don't'. Other words which are often confused are 'cloth' and 'clothe'. The former is a noun meaning a piece of material, either one which is cut and sewn into 'clothes' or just a simple square used to wash and wipe, and rhymes with 'moth' while the latter is a verb (and in the plural) a noun - 'clothes' - pronounced with a voiced 'th' (as in 'then') The present and past participles, 'clothing' and 'clothed' are both pronounced with the diphthong, as in 'show' and the voiced 'th'. English words and spellings are truly a minefield for people whose own language has a perfectly regular and predictable spelling system!
1 person likes this
@Mavic123456 (22024)
• Thailand
24 Apr 13
an American friend of mine explained this to me too. I told her it is really difficult how words are pronounce in written form.. it would be easier to understand if they are taught verbally. that's why I specifically stated for Non-Native English Speakers like me. I really love the way how English speak in fact I am fascinated on the intonation, pronunciation and syllabication you make. I love listening to your conversation and I feel like I want to chew and digest each word. this is so nice my favorite owl. Thanks for this clarification. I appreciate your presence in this discussion and your very nice explanation. Thumbs up for you friend.
1 person likes this
@kalav56 (11465)
• India
24 Apr 13
owlwings! While reading your explanation I was reminded of "produce' [verb] and 'produce' [noun ] and the difference in pronunciation when it is used as a verb and a noun, .This was taught to us by our lecturer in college . I bow to those superior teachers at this juncture.we tend to pronounce many words correctly without analysis, if only we have good teachers.
@Angelpink (4018)
• Philippines
25 Apr 13
They are not only experts in guidelines of Mylot but also an expert in English Communications skills 1 ,2 , 3..... Owling explained it very very comprehensively ! Nothing i can add. Sometimes that is also my mistakes in writing , sometimes i interchange them and have no time to think and recheck . Thanks Mavic for bringing this topic for often we committed this mistake.
@rsa101 (34024)
• Philippines
25 Apr 13
Wow are you an english teacher? I agree with you many times I am confuse with these two words. I really appreciate reading it here in Mylot!
@Mavic123456 (22024)
• Thailand
25 Apr 13
shhh... I am pretending to be an English Teacher here.. shhhhhhhhhh that's a secret and just between the two of us ok? you are welcome rsa i appreciate you learning.. Read Owlwing's comprehensive respond (up .. up... ) that's the exact explanation.
@Angelpink (4018)
• Philippines
25 Apr 13
Yes that is a secret between the two of you , no one hears it , not even me..LOL !
@Mavic123456 (22024)
• Thailand
25 Apr 13
argh! rsa someone heard our little secret.....
@francesca5 (1344)
25 Apr 13
I am a native english speaker and I usually have to think about which to use. The problem I have is that it seems logical to me that when we say "you lose" that the o in that word is so long, there should be two of them, but there aren't. Whereas the word "loose" actually has a shorter different "o" sound. I always want to put two "o's" in lose, and there are times when it just seems right, but breaking the rules just can't be done. But a lot of people do it by mistake, and its not surprising.
@Mavic123456 (22024)
• Thailand
25 Apr 13
Thanks for this response. I was beginning to think that having here as a discussion was a mistake, for I looked already so stup!d in the eyes of the native English speakers. LOL. Thank you so much... i appreciate this really.
25 Apr 13
Pleased to be of some help here, it drives me mad, as lose just so sounds like it wants two o's, and I really have to stop myself from writing the word that way. People do say that english spellings are sometimes strange, and I do think this is one case where the spellings don't properly reflect the sounds of the words.
@Zer0Stats (1309)
• India
25 Apr 13
Because your belt is loose,you will probably lose your pants. Pronounce the word 'loose' as 'looz' and 'lose' as 'loz' and see it's not same.
@Mavic123456 (22024)
• Thailand
25 Apr 13
yes, point well taken.. Zero.... Owlwings made a good explanation. whoooooooops.... thanks for dropping by and share your thoughts... until next time....
@owlwings (44065)
• Cambridge, England
25 Apr 13
I'm afraid you are wrong, Zer0Stats. It's the other way round - the pronunciation should be: "buh`coz yor `belt is `loos, yoo will `prob-uh-bli `looz yor `pants." (where 'oo' is about the same value as in 'tool', and longer than in 'look'. 'uh' represents the short, indeterminate sound like the 'a' in 'ago. '`' indicates stress on the following syllable.)
@johndur (3045)
• Pasig, Philippines
25 Apr 13
well we can distinguish it if its used in a sentence.even if its almost sounds the same it has different meanings.but i think the word loose is pronounced longer than the word lose.
@Mavic123456 (22024)
• Thailand
25 Apr 13
yes some mix this up... LOL just an observation