Chronic Illness in the USA: Dying a Little Faster than the Rest

Chronic Illness in the USA: Dying a Little Faster than the Rest
Glen Dale, West Virginia
January 9, 2017 6:58pm CST
I have a chronic, malignant condition known as Vascular Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome. Because of this genetic disease, I also struggle with Postural Orthostatic Tachycardia syndrome, fat malabsorption and a load of other associated effects despite pristine effort to lead a healthy lifestyle. In my hometown, I worked as a nurse for 8 years providing care to many with chronic conditions much like my own. There's a high prevalence of Lupus, Multiple Sclerosis and ALS to name a few concentrated in my area in addition to a slew of patients receiving care under more nonspecific diagnoses such as IBS, anxiety, functional bowel disorders, allergies and so on. Cancer is highly concentrated in my area as well only expounding the negative effect on the many chronic illness patients who eventually become cancer patients. If chronic illness were an infectious disease, the incidence in the USA would measure at epidemic proportions. Are some predisposed for a hard, miserable life because of genetics and environmental influences? What factors present the most negative impact on health? Does anyone else notice a sharp increase in chronic illnesses over the last twenty years? How many people in America are free of disease? What is is the bigger majority: The Chronically Ill or the Eternally Healthy? It keeps me wondering!
4 people like this
2 responses
@suhail1 (936)
• Manila, Philippines
10 Jan 17
wish the days ahead for you are healthy
1 person likes this
• Glen Dale, West Virginia
10 Jan 17
I appreciate the well wishes
@suhail1 (936)
• Manila, Philippines
10 Jan 17
@dmfm369 your welcome
1 person likes this
@Freelanzer (9690)
• Canada
10 Jan 17
Both genetics and environment can play a role. Hope you get better and are able to manage it.