Video May Have Killed the Radio Star, but Radio Disc Jockeys Killed the Radio Dicc Jockey...

@ParaTed2k (22972)
Sheboygan, Wisconsin
July 27, 2019 8:39pm CST
Video may have killed the radio star, but the only thing that killed the radio disc jockey was radio disc jockeys. In the early days of music based radio, the disc jockeys developed characters that became synonymous with the songs they played. A well designed and produced radio show made the fans plan their week around the DJ's air time. Listening to these radio shows was a community event. True, people were listening to them in their own homes, cars and at work, but when people got together they takes about their favorite DJ every bit as much as they talked about the songs. Then somewhere in the late 70s, early 80s disc jockeys changed. They just wanted to "be themselves". They didn't think they should have to develop characters or do a show. They became song introducers and many didn't even bother announcing the song. They made themselves an interruption of the music, almost an annoyance. Especially when they talked through the intro of the song. They gave the listener no reason to care who was playing the records, so we didn't... And still don't.
7 people like this
6 responses
@kareng (27856)
• United States
28 Jul
Also, the computerization process killed radio. I was a DJ in the late 70's and loved the work. The characters were very popular and made the show. We always had requests for more skits, etc.
2 people like this
@kepweng (30474)
• United States
28 Jul
Wow what company radio station. You work with
1 person likes this
@ParaTed2k (22972)
• Sheboygan, Wisconsin
28 Jul
It would have been fun being a DJ back then. Local celebrity and being involved in fun local events. Sucks about the pay though.
1 person likes this
@kareng (27856)
• United States
30 Jul
@ParaTed2k Very true. The pay sucked big time but it was a fun job and you can't say that about too many jobs.
1 person likes this
@RasmaSandra (34105)
• Daytona Beach, Florida
28 Jul
You are right I really love the Dj personalities. When I was a teenager in the 1970s we all love this one station and the DJ who was Cousin Brucie he was a real personality. Kind of fun I looked him up online and the guy is still around at the young age of 83 and I know that he still would have made a darn good DJ.
2 people like this
@ParaTed2k (22972)
• Sheboygan, Wisconsin
28 Jul
Yup, the DJs we grew up with in Northern Utah were Skinny Johnny Mitchell, Wooly Waldrun and Lynn Lehmann. I couldn't tell you the names of any radio DJs since 1980.
2 people like this
• United States
28 Jul
clear channel probably had something to do with that too.a DJ friend told me once they took over the station,if they deviated from the script in the slightest they were canned.
1 person likes this
@crossbones27 (32590)
• Redlands, California
28 Jul
Plus they played crap music that the record label's wanted them to play. Pop stations still do well the rest of us were true music lovers I guess. All those stations going belly up.
D.J. Davis manifesto. Full ghetto, from the top.
@ParaTed2k (22972)
• Sheboygan, Wisconsin
29 Jul
This is another example from after the era I'm talking about. Most of the radio DJs took themselves out of the equation long before the homogenization and consolidation that came with automation and corporation. Whew, those could be lyrics lol
1 person likes this
• Redlands, California
29 Jul
@ParaTed2k Very true and those would make cool lyrics, funny how that works and usually the best way to do lyrics. Well done buddy.
1 person likes this
@debjani1 (7383)
29 Jul
I was a teenager during 90s and loved DJ the most.
@sophie09 (13420)
• Indonesia
28 Jul
i just knew about this. thanks for sharing