I need to know What Wave due process means

United States
September 25, 2006 12:51am CST
My Boy friend is going though a big fight with child support.First dna 99.9 Not dad 3 months later said he is the dad all we want is another DNA been fighting this for 13 years with state.Went back to court and the Child support lawyers want him to lawyer want my boyfriend to wave due process need help please.
2 responses
@MySpot (2602)
• United States
14 Oct 06
99.9 means he IS the Father. It does not have to, nor does it usually, read 100%. 99.9 is as close as you will get in determining a fraternal match. It sounds like he's already missed way too much time to get to know his child and especially supporting him/her. That's so sad : (
• United States
15 Oct 06
The first test cleared him as the father 99.98 not the father,after three months of his blood sitting in a lab unsealed the sent a letter saying they made somekind of mistake and they were doing another test with three month old blood took two months and then they say he is the father.My husband is whithe and mother is white but child looks half black and has sickel cell all we want is another test to prove he is or hes not.see where we are coming from.And we have been paying child support on a child that at first said was not his and the case was dismissed and closed.then all of a sudden oops mistake your are.
@MySpot (2602)
• United States
15 Oct 06
The part that confuses me is that 99.98 determines he is not the Father??? 99.98% does not exclude him as the Father.... the mistake they made was probably telling him that it did. I don't see why they wouldn't allow another test. It can get expensive but he has the right to request another test. Of course, in most states, he would be resposible for payment of his testing and the child if it is found to be his. http://www.reliagene.com/index.asp?menu_id=paternity&content_id=pt_results Understanding your Paternity Test Results: To understand your paternity test results, it is important to remember that a child receives equal amounts of genetic material from its father and mother. In the paternity test, several locations on the tested DNA are used to determine the likelihood that the tested man is the father. These locations are listed in the TEST column on the left side of the paternity test results. For each location tested, the mother, child and alleged father’s result (or phenotype) is represented by a number in the final report. When you read the result, it is important to first compare the numbers for the child and mother. Because the child received half of its DNA from the mother, one of the numbers in the child’s column must match one of the numbers in the mother’s column. Once you have determined which number of the child’s matches the mother, the child’s remaining number must match one of the father’s numbers. If the tested man has the same number as the child, he cannot be excluded as the biological father of the child. If the tested man does not share that number with the child, the man can be excluded as the father of the child for that location on the DNA. If the father is excluded for three (3) or more locations in the DNA, the man cannot be the biological father of the child. Inclusionary Paternity Test Report Example - (Sample report) Loci Mother Child Tested Man Paternity Index D16S539 9, 11 9, 12 12, 13 2.48 D19S433 13, 14 14, 14.2 13.2, 14.2 8.47 D21511 28, 29 29, 33.2 30, 33.2 12.2 In this report, the numbers that the child shares with the mother are in bold type and the numbers that the child shares with the father are in italics. The paternity index is simply a measure of how common that number is within the tested man’s racial group. The paternity index for each test is multiplied together to obtain a combined paternity index. From the combined paternity index, the probability of paternity is calculated. ReliaGene routinely provides a minimum 99.9% probability of paternity for every inclusionary paternity test. This is one of the highest percentages of any DNA testing laboratory. The summary of findings will also state that the tested man is NOT EXCLUDED as the biological father of the child. Exclusionary Paternity Test Result Example - (Sample report) Loci Mother Child Tested Man D16S539 9, 11 9, 14 12, 13 Inconsistent D19S433 13, 14 14, 14.2 12, 15 Inconsistent D21511 28, 29 29, 33.2 26, 36 Inconsistent In this report, the numbers that the child shares with the mother are in bold type. It is easy to see that the child does not share its remaining number with the tested man, indicating that the child did not receive its DNA from the tested man. Because the child does not receive its DNA from the tested man, there is no paternity index given. The word “INCONSISTENT” indicates the failure of the DNA to match between the tested man and the child. In this case, the tested man is not the biological father of the child. http://www.paternityfrauddna.com/faq.html ((HOME TEST AVAILABLE HERE)) PaternityFraudDNA tests are extremely accurate. If the DNA of the alleged father and child matches, the probability that he is the biological father is typically over 99.98%. On the other hand, if mismatches result between the DNA an alleged father and child, they are 100% excluded from being biologically related, they are not biological father and child. However, there are circumstances, though rare, that do not allow for certainty, even though the determination through testing the DNA is as accurate as possible. PaternityFraudDNA offers a 100% money-back guarantee (testing fees only) if a probability of paternity of at least 99.98% for a standard paternity test including the mother, child, and alleged father is not achieved for non-exclusions. We also guarantee at least 99.98% for a comprehensive paternity test with only the alleged father and child for non-exclusions. Other types of testing is not as certain and cannot be reasonably guaranteed, by us or anyone else, regardless of what you may be told. HERE'S ANOTHER: http://www.cirbc.org/dna-paternity-testing.cfm?topic=time
@MySpot (2602)
• United States
15 Oct 06
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Due_process Due process ~ From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Jump to: navigation, search In United States law, due process (more fully due process of law) is the principle that the government must respect all of a person's legal rights instead of just some or most of those legal rights when the government deprives a person of life, liberty, or property. Due process has also been interpreted as placing limitations on laws and legal proceedings in order to guarantee fundamental fairness, justice, and liberty. Many nations have similar concepts; for example, Canada and New Zealand have a similar concept that they call fundamental justice. Procedural due process ~ Procedural due process is essentially based on the concept of "fundamental fairness." As a bare minimum, it includes an individual's right to be adequately notified of charges or proceedings involving him, and the opportunity to be heard at these proceedings. In criminal cases, it ensures that an accused person will not be subjected to cruel and unusual punishment. In the United States, criminal prosecutions and civil cases are governed by explicit guarantees of rights under the Bill of Rights and as incorporated under the Fourteenth Amendment to the States. Due process provides a minimum floor of protection to the individual that statutes, regulations, and enforcement actions must at least meet (but can exceed), in order to ensure that no one is deprived of life, liberty, or property arbitrarily and without opportunity to affect the judgment or result. This minimum protection extends to all government proceedings that can result in an individual's deprivation, whether civil or criminal in nature, from parole violation hearings to administrative hearings regarding government benefits and entitlements to full-blown criminal trials. In criminal cases, many of these due process protections overlap with procedural protections provided by the Eighth Amendment to the United States Constitution, which guarantees reliable procedures that protect innocent people from being punished, which would be tantamount to cruel and unusual punishment.