Practise or practice?

@loudcry (1044)
India
December 25, 2006 10:01pm CST
These are some words i was confused about. -Practice and practise Practice is a nown Practise is a verb. e.g The Drama practice was a good experience. We had to practise all day for the Play. -Advice and Advise Advice is a nown Advise is a verd e.g HE gave the students good advice. 'I would advise you to read this book' said the teacher. -Who's and whose Who's means 'who is' Whose means belonging to a person. e.g Who's the man we saw in the college today? Whose is that new car.
3 responses
• India
26 Dec 06
affect and effect there, their, and they're capital and capitol affluent and effluent atheist and agnostic lavatory and laboratory.
• United States
26 Dec 06
Yes, those are confusing for many people as well!
@loudcry (1044)
• India
26 Dec 06
Thanks for the comment.
• United States
26 Dec 06
In the US, we spell practice with a "c" whether it is a noun or a verb. Advice/advice and who's/whose are tricky though, especially for people who speak English as a second language (though it seems most Americans have trouble with it as well). Here are some more that people mix up: its/it's "its" is possessive and refers to ownership: "The cat licked its tail. "it's" is a contraction short for "it is": It's getting dark outside, so come in the house to/too/two "to" can be used a couple of ways. One is in the place of the word "toward", such as "Go to the other side of the room." Another usage is verbs in the infinitive form: to work, to play, to sleep, to do, etc. "too" also has a couple of uses. I can mean "also": "I have blue eyes too!" Or it can mean "excessively": "You talk too much!", "It is too hot outside to wear long pants." "two" is the number after one! "I have two feet." your/you're This is one of my pet peeves! Get it right people! "Your" is a possessive adverb that refers to ownership: "I like your ice cream better than Bethany's." "You're" is a contraction of the words "you are": You're starting to make me angry with your bad grammar! There you go... hope I helped clear some things up for you!
@loudcry (1044)
• India
26 Dec 06
Thanks for the response.
@angnima (772)
• Nepal
4 Jan 07
You look quite confused. I have to say something about repeated confusion.If you find the same confusion many times you need a book.Do not ask other. You can enjoy asking .That's your freedom. It is better to buy a standard dictionary.