Creationism in Public Schools

@cyntrow (8524)
United States
January 2, 2007 8:02pm CST
First let me say that I identify as Christian. Therefore I believe in the original story of creation. "In the beginning was the word, and the word was with God and the word was God." As a woman of half Jewish Descent, I also believe that Lillith, not Eve was the first female, from the Hebrew Bible. I also believe in evolution, because most of it has been scientifically proven. Although I believe that a supreme being was the cause of this vast universe we all live in, I am completely against this theory being taught in public schools. Faith, not science is behind my beliefs. I teach my children my faith at church and at home. This teaching has no business at schools. What do the rest of you think??? I welcome fundementalists from both sides, as well as moderate thinkers.
4 people like this
25 responses
• United States
3 Jan 07
I was raised as a Christian and believe wholly in creationism as opposed to evolution. As I attended my science and biology classes in high school, I remember being absolutely furious about having to learn evolution not as a theory, but as truth. It was even worse to me when on test day, we were made to answer the questions regarding Darwin's theory as fact, even though my beliefs were completely different. I understand why school systems are afraid to teach anything other than evolution to students questioning the origins of man. However, I feel that believing in evolution takes a much faith as believing in creationism. After all, just as many people were witness to the million year transformation of man from a single celled organism as were to God creating all things in the course of 7 days. And as far as I believe, no concrete evidence as been brought forth to sway me towards evolution. Frankly, I feel that it would be more fair for school to teach a variety of theories on origin, instead of just one. I know that this will enrage the atheists out there, but I also know many Christians who were enraged at having to learn evolution as fact, when they knew in their hearts it was a lie.
2 people like this
@cyntrow (8524)
• United States
4 Jan 07
I'm sorry. I respect your opinion, but there is nothing in creationism that can be proven; Nothing. Faith should be kept out of the class rooms and in the homes and churches. Only theories with proven evidence should be taught in Science classes.
• United States
4 Jan 07
Where is the proven evidence? There is as much evidence of God as there is of Darwin's theory.
• United States
4 Jan 07
Also, if you identify as a Christian, you should believe in reaching as many people with the Word of God and salvation message as possible, through all mediums, not just church and Sunday School. If people do not want to learn creationism in school, fine, but people who have alternative beliefs should not have to take courses subjecting them to lies passed off as fact as with evolution. I further think that the decline of morality in this country is partly due to the first people to say that creationism should be banned and Darwinism embraced. After all, after a 6 week course describing to us how we are all just animals after all and that the only greater power is ourselves, we can't really be held responsible for our actions, now can we.
• United States
3 Jan 07
I couldn't agree with your idea that school is not the place to teach faith. A friend of mine was a biology teacher who was told they were not allowed to speak for more than 1 day to their class about evolution. They ended up quitting teaching over it. It's kind of scary that public schools can get turned into churches like that.
2 people like this
@cyntrow (8524)
• United States
3 Jan 07
That's really sad. A Christian friend of mine said that evolution is not proven. I say, look at a cell in a petrie dish for a few days. Watch it change. That's evolution. Another friend said that the Bible says the world is only 6000 years old. Science proves that fossils have been found dating back millions of years. These are things that should be taught in schools. The rest is up to the individual believer to decifer.
2 people like this
• United States
3 Jan 07
Oh yeah, I've seen people try to argue that all that carbon dating stuff is nonsense and that fossils of early man were just the giants/titans/etc mentioned in the bible. The bible also makes reference to the earth being the center of the universe... They gave up teaching that a few hundred years ago though (not after they put Galileo in prison of course).
2 people like this
@deebomb (15322)
• United States
3 Jan 07
cyntrow Does those cells become some thing different than they started out as or just multiply? when you get all your facts evolution is another religion because it is not really a proven fact. Evolution is just another way of interpretation the evidence.
1 person likes this
@misskatonic (3726)
• United States
3 Jan 07
I agree. I identify as Christian, but I'm of the belief that while God created the world and everything in it, I believe He just laid the foundation. Kind of like those little capsule dinosaur sponges. You know, there's the tab you drop in water and it turns into a dinosaur? God made the capsule and added the needed elements, and evolution carried out His plan. But I do believe that faith is something to be taught in the home and the church, not the school. School is for fact based findings, as you said.
2 people like this
@cyntrow (8524)
• United States
3 Jan 07
Thanks for your response. I'm hoping to find a number of people who disagree as well. It scares me when groups seek to change science to fit their spiritual beliefs. Especially where my kids are concerned. As I said, my faith is my own. Science should be in the classroom.
1 person likes this
@cyntrow (8524)
• United States
3 Jan 07
I love your "Dinosaur Sponge" analogy, btw
1 person likes this
@Chiriac (286)
• Romania
3 Jan 07
Creationism can be taught in public schools, as it is a theory. HOWEVER, it is *NOT* science and should not be taught in the science classroom. Creationism's place in education is in mythology; even the Christian notion of creationism can be considered mythological, as it is based off of ancient theories.
2 people like this
@cyntrow (8524)
• United States
4 Jan 07
Yes, I can see that. In a history class or a philosophy class or theology. But Many are trying to get creationism into the science curriculam and calling it intelligent design. Anyway you slice it's still faith based and not fact based.
@jricbt (1455)
• Brazil
3 Jan 07
Creationism is religion, you need faith to believe it, If you want to teach it in public schools, then must be allowed to teach other creationisms, like muslim, hindu, etc. If someone want to teach his kids this stuff, go ahead, that is what sunday school is for. Not in public schools. Creationism does not have one single scientific fact to support it. Creationism use gaps in the theory of evolution, market them as flaws, which they are not (that is why it is a scientific theory, new ideas are constantly added to it, explaining more and more and the gaps are every day smaller). It is possible that we may not know all about how the evolution occurred and occurs, but we know enough to say that it is scientific. Creationism is faith. Only that.
2 people like this
• India
3 Jan 07
Only facts should be taught at schools. Factual theories which are proven and have abundant evidences. Beliefs should stay out, it applies for both sides. Nobody is allowed to say that God doesn't exist in schools. The same should apply the other way. How fair is the system which allows spreading beliefs about the existence of God and shunning the belief against it.
@lulylove (1561)
• Brazil
3 Jan 07
I think that this is very good! Therefore the children need something positive in its infancia and to believe God is something extremely positive. But you must respect the free will of its children therefore they you must choose its proper religions.
2 people like this
@Pigglies (9339)
• United States
3 Jan 07
I agree with you. Because children in public schools are of all faiths, it is wrong to teach one faith as the truth. Science has to have something to back it up and should be taught to the students. If other ideas are taught, they should be taught just as that, ideas or myths on creation. When I was in school, we learned the various ideas from different cultures and religions on creation in either English class or history. But in science classes, we learned evolution.
2 people like this
@sororravn (449)
• United States
3 Jan 07
I do not identify with any organized religion nor do I consider myself a christian. I do not agree with the theory of creationism or intelligent design. I think that both of those theories are based on faith and there should be a separation of church and state. It is fine to teach your child what your faith teaches you outside of school. I say that science should be taught at schools - not faith. It is good to see a christian out there who feels that church shoulod be left out of the schools!
2 people like this
@wmaharper (2316)
• United States
3 Jan 07
Wow, it seems many of your beliefs would contradict themselves. You must have a difficult time keeping them straight. I think they should either teach NO theories (evolution) in school, or teach both sides to present both schools of thought to the student and let them make a descision for themselves. The parents really ought to be in charge of teaching thier own children though, because even if they were to teach creationism, i would not trust them to teach my child all that he needs to know..
1 person likes this
@cyntrow (8524)
• United States
3 Jan 07
Actually, I was blessed with the ability to keep an open mind, to think for myself and not blindly follow the passages in a book. God gave us a brain. I think we should use it. For the record, you are misusing the word theory. Evolution is a scientific theory, meaning proven to the point that it is scientifically more likely to be the case than to not be the case. I could theorize that if I got close enough, I could swing on a star, but this is not a scientific theory, since it cannot be proved and can in fact be disproved. Creationism can neither be proved nor disproved, which is why I believe it has no place being taught in biology classes.
@deebomb (15322)
• United States
3 Jan 07
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Jump to: navigation, search The word theory has a number of distinct meanings in different fields of knowledge, depending on their methodologies and the context of discussion. In common usage, people often use the word theory to signify a conjecture, an opinion, or a speculation. In this usage, a theory is not necessarily based on facts; in other words, it is not required to be consistent with true descriptions of reality. True descriptions of reality are more reflectively understood as statements that would be true independently of what people think about them. In science, a theory is a proposed description, explanation, or model of the manner of interaction of a set of natural phenomena, capable of predicting future occurrences or observations of the same kind, and capable of being tested through experiment or otherwise falsified through empirical observation. It follows from this that for scientists "theory" and "fact" do not necessarily stand in opposition. For example, it is a fact that an apple dropped on earth has been observed to fall towards the center of the planet, and the theory which explains why the apple behaves so is the current theory of gravitation.
1 person likes this
@estherlou (5017)
• United States
3 Jan 07
Evolution is as you say, teaching how a species evolved over time. The "theory of evolution" usually refers to the idea that people evolved from apes, and that has not been proven inconclusively...it is still a theory.
@82idiots (595)
• United States
3 Jan 07
A snake did NOT decieve a woman and plunge the human race into "the fall". it is an irrational belief. You're doing good to not be fundy. Do a little better!
1 person likes this
@deebomb (15322)
• United States
3 Jan 07
Is it rational to believe that you came from a rock.
@cyntrow (8524)
• United States
4 Jan 07
82, I think a much of the Bible is symbolism. But that does not mean that I don't believe in God. I do believe in God. I believe in Science. I believe in human beings, believe it or not. I do not believe in religion. A building; a dress and hat on Sunday; a contest to see who can sing the better harmonies; none of these makes anyone a better person. Dee, no one ever claimed anyone came from a rock. Such a thing has never been theorized to my knowledge.
@kiwimac (324)
• New Zealand
7 Jan 07
I see Genesis 1 & 2 as parables. Rather than a snapshot of HOW God created the universe and all things in it, I see it as a story of WHY. Science, evolution, geology, physics and chemistry these can tell us how God went about the processes that led to all things that are but only faith can tell us why. So then I see Genesis 1 & 2 as our story, our individual story because I see each of us as Adam, each of us as Eve, each of us are God's special, loved creation for whom God brought all things into being.
@cyntrow (8524)
• United States
7 Jan 07
Very well stated!
• United States
3 Jan 07
I am a Christian as well. I believe that the two theories of faith and creationism are not mutually exclusive. But do I believe that creationism should be taught in the schools? Not as the exclusive theory. I think if the lesson is going to be viable that all sides of the story need to be mentioned. If the teacher could say something like, "Christians believe that a supreme being is behind it" and leave it at that, I don't see anything wrong with it. But yes, science is the subject that should be taught in school, not religion. But I think it is important for people to at least know that there is a debate going on about the issue.
@cyntrow (8524)
• United States
4 Jan 07
I can see your point, but in a history class, or philosophy, or theology. Religious beliefs should not be taught in Science class. By the way, Jews, Buddists, Muslims, and Christians all believe in a supreme being. I don't think I left anyone out.
@mikaghi (388)
• United States
3 Jan 07
evolution is a proven theory and creationism is just faith. i agree with u that evolution should be taught at school coz that is why schools are for, to teach children reason and logic. our faith will always have a place in our home and place of worship.
1 person likes this
@lulylove (1561)
• Brazil
3 Jan 07
I think as you! And I believe that it must respect the free will of its children therefore they must choose its proper religions. But nor all the parents make this therefore believe to be owners of its children and owner of the thoughts of them.
1 person likes this
• United States
31 Jan 07
I really think all ideas should be taught. We aren't going to keep our kids from hearing other versions of the creation of our world and if we are true to our religion we will know that they know how WE think about it and what we hope THEY believe. I for one want my kids to know all they can about other ideas, cultures, etc. and if that means learning about something that I don't agree with in particular then why not? It's our job at home to teach them OUR beliefs and morals. It's the job at school to teach them various ideas out there and what so many others may think.
1 person likes this
@katcarneo (1442)
• Philippines
3 Jan 07
I studied in a public school and we had this religion class. it basically contradicted everything that was taught to us in science class. religion said we were made in the image and likeness of god. science says we started out as monkeys. i think one of the most difficult things about having religion class in school is because nt all people have the same beliefs. in our school the person teaching religion was catholic so what she says is just a load of crap for those who believe differently. however, you had to go with the flow because you're graded. I have experienced answering exams about things I don't really believe in because if I answer what I believe is right then it would automatically be wrong and I would fail the test.
• United States
3 Jan 07
As a Christian believer, I believe in Creationism. But, like you said, my faith is the basis of my beliefs. I too believe in forms of evolution, allowed by God - of course. I think, there are no definited facts about the "beginning", just strong theories. I think schools could present the main theories and recommend to their students that they need to search for what they'll choose to believe.
1 person likes this
@magikrose (5423)
• United States
3 Jan 07
I have to totally agree with you. I am not of christian faith but I do believe in God and I believe it is my job to teach my children religin. There are so many diffrent beliefs in the world today that to offer only one point of view could be a clash to someone elses beliefs and could cause problems in school. Teaching of religin of any kind should be done at home and at church if you go.
1 person likes this
@nuffsed (1273)
3 Jan 07
As war ravages our tired planet more and more, greater numbers of people are losing their faith. Many "Don't knows" are becoming "No way"'s At the same time Islam is gaining and growing fastest of the religions. Personally I cannot believe in a "chosen peoples" kind of racist religion. I think this is the basis of many peoples problem with religion. A humanitarian will respect all human life equally. I am of that type. It fits in with evolution, it fits in with respect for all nature. It fits in with love thy neighbour. School is for facts, IMHO Fiction is addressed in "creative writing" or "creative studies" Lets never confuse fact with fiction. Lets never condemn a man because of his race, and lets never accept a "chosen one" because it says so in a much manipulated book.
@jurekz (361)
• Indonesia
4 Jan 07
Sorry I did not know about the Christian religion..But I was convinced.. All the religions taught peace, and the religion that did not teach the peace that I did not like :). When you a teacher tried to educate pupils was heard by you true :)