What should you not do when including your job resume in your email?

@kgwat70 (13392)
United States
January 4, 2007 8:10pm CST
Do you send it by including your resume as an attachment or do you copy and paste it from another program on your computer? I have been told that you should never include your resume as an attachment in your email because employers and agencies are scared of getting a computer virus. If they tell you to do it, then you can but otherwise you should copy and paste your resume into your letter like you are writing them. I had never even thought about this til someone I know told me. What is your opinion about this?
3 people like this
45 responses
@BunGirl (2639)
• United States
5 Jan 07
Most employers that I have ever worked with specify that they want your resume in a certain format (typically Word). If they didn't specify, I would probably send it in Word format anyway. Any major company should have virus protection in place to avoid such issues. Of course, you could always ask what format they would like.
2 people like this
@kgwat70 (13392)
• United States
5 Jan 07
This is very good to know, though I am not job searching right now. That is good that your companies specified what format they wanted their resumes in. I do not see that much in our papers or websites here. They say to either email it or fax it or mail it but nothing specific about attachments or not. Thank you for sharing your experiences.
1 person likes this
@rhodilee (114)
• Philippines
9 Jan 07
Thank you for posting such an informative discussion. This post has been very informative and useful such that I have always been in a dilemma whether to copy paste my resume to the body of the email or as an attachment.
• Singapore
5 Jan 07
i never realize that...but it has been very common to send job applications through email with an attachment of the resume that i did not think much of it. after all, they specifically request to send a Word file with the resume attached :D
2 people like this
• India
5 Jan 07
well i agree that the employers do not said that you should rsume only as attachement.i do not think so that only because of virus fear, he do not open the attachement.well all mails are scanned before they are downloaded.
1 person likes this
@brokentia (10394)
• United States
5 Jan 07
I copy and paste it also. Because there are so many viruses out there, I think it is best for the potential employer to feel safe about viewing my resume. Also, copying and pasting is a quicker view for them. If they had to open it...and think about opening it...it could waste some time and it may never be view or catch the employer's attention.
2 people like this
@kgwat70 (13392)
• United States
5 Jan 07
I too think like everyone here that it is quicker and more convenient for employers to open your email and see your resume right there in front of them, even though they should have antivirus protection.
1 person likes this
• United States
5 Jan 07
If it appears in the body of the email it is more apt to draw attention. If the employer needs to open the attachement to read it, it may just go overlooked.
2 people like this
@kgwat70 (13392)
• United States
5 Jan 07
That is very true as it sticks out more if you have it included in the body of the email instead of hidden as an attachment. They can not miss it if it is in the body of the email. Have a wonderful evening.
1 person likes this
• United States
6 Jan 07
I have sent it in both as an email and as an attachment. From my experience most prefer it as an attachment. It can be download and then printed
2 people like this
@Asylum (48046)
• Manchester, England
5 Jan 07
This is a very valid point, but like yourself I would not have previously thought about it. Most companies are now becoming almost neurotic about viruses, but I can understand that due to the dependance of companies on their computer system to support the business. My own company do not even allow me to send an attachment. I can email in to my work related inbox, or that of anyone else at work, but if I send an attachment the email will be deleted and never arrive.
2 people like this
@humaaaa (1387)
• Pakistan
5 Jan 07
* Job seekers must choose a file format in which to maintain their résumé. Many employers insist on receiving résumés only as Microsoft Word documents. Others will accept résumés formatted in HTML, PDF, or plain ASCII text. * Many potential employers now find candidates' résumés through search engines, which makes it more important for candidates to use appropriate keywords when writing a résumé. * Including an e-mail address in an online résumé exposes the job seeker to spam. Some career fields include a special section listing the life-long works of the author. For computer-related fields, the softography; for musicians and composers, the discography; for actors a filmography. Keeping résumés online has become increasingly common for people in professions that benefit from the multimedia and rich detail that are offered by an HTML résumé, such as actors, photographers, graphic designers, developers, dancers, etc. Job seekers are finding an ever increasing demand to have an electronic version of their resume available to employers and professionals who use Internet recruiting at any time. Internet resumes differ from conventional resumes in that they are comprehensive and allow for self-reflection. Unlike regular 2 page resumes, which only show recent work experience and education, Internet résumés also show an individual’s skill development over his or her career. Another advantage to internet resumes is the significant cost savings over traditional hiring methods. The average cost of recruiting online is $152, compared to $1383 through traditional methods. This in turn has cut costs for many growing organizations, as well as saving time and energy in recruitment. Until the development of résumés in an electronic format, employers would have to sort through massive stacks of paper to find suitable candidates without any way of filtering out the poor candidates. Employers are now able to set search parameters in their database of résumés to reduce the number of résumés which must be reviewed in detail in the search for the ideal candidate.[citation needed] [edit] Electronic résumé formats * Description of a Career (DOAC) is a XML format to share the job seeker's curriculum on the hypothetical semantic internet so it can be accessed by nearly any employer. * hResume is a Microformat for making HTML representations of the job seeker's résumé machine readable
2 people like this
@syeung (15)
• Australia
5 Jan 07
The company should have virus protection. Unless specified otherwise, I send mine in pdf format. There are some free converters that will convert your Word doc into Adobe pdf. It takes up less space in their inbox. Anyway my resume is typed up in Excel! Makes it easier to line up the columns :)
2 people like this
• India
5 Jan 07
All the employers have adequate security system in place: the correct way to send a resume is with a covering letter: almost all employers of any merit have formated the resume in the order in which they require: but if the employer has defined the way it has to be sent, OK go ahead.
2 people like this
• India
5 Jan 07
Well, it depends from company to company. Majority prefers resumes as attachment, some companies prefer the candidate to actually register in the company website, and some in text format only. In my case I have submitted only through atttachments. To bring out the effect on the name of the topic you have posted, I would ask every one to keep their resumes in a very well know location in their computers. You wouldn't like to mix it with other unrelated documents leading you to attach a recipe instead of your resume unknowingly...
2 people like this
• India
5 Jan 07
Firstly i have to thank u for posting such a good discussion as i came to know a lot from the responses and comming to the point,Most of the job seekers send their resume in attachment form and most of the recruiters also prefer the same.It purely depends on the company in accpeting ur resume and if they insist only then i suggest u to go for this copy and pste method and if they do not just send as an attachment and dont worry abt the virus problem as the virus cant be transfered thro word or text format.So keep sending the resume in the attachment rather than the copy and paste method....
@SK401001 (934)
• United States
5 Jan 07
When I was searching for a job I would send my resume as and attachment, in a PDF file, unless it specifies Word.
2 people like this
• India
5 Jan 07
The problem with copy pasting resume in email as text is that the formatting goes completely haywire due to different email systems at different places. It only leads to problems for the employer to make sense of the mail. Moreover, most of the email engines and companies have stringent checks built-in to scan all incoming mails. One solution is that one should write a brief summary of his profile as part of email and send main resume as attachment. So, even if the attachment can't be opened, the summary should suffice to interest the employer.
@plasma (675)
• India
5 Jan 07
There is no fixed standard format and is totally an employer dependent option. normally they ask you to attach your resume in word or a plain text format and you would have to stick to that. so never get worried of passing virus to the other end with your attachments and FYI it's still the most widely used option to send and receive files. :) Thanks
2 people like this
@subha12 (18449)
• India
5 Jan 07
i'm in habit of sending resume as an email attachment. there are some employers also who provide a table type of thing at the body of the mail to send sone information. But i think the should have virus protection to open the CVs. its the most general way of sending resume.
2 people like this
@harivinod (781)
• India
5 Jan 07
send in the word format
2 people like this
@leonilyn (467)
• Philippines
5 Jan 07
As per company's request. If they requested to include your resume as attachment then you can do it. But most of the company do not accept attachment for most of the viruses are emailed in the form of attachment. So most of the time I include my resume as part of the body of the letter itself... Hope this helps.
• United States
5 Jan 07
There are a few factors to take into consideration when doing either. Most important, if they specify a format do so exactly. If they don't, here are a few things to think about. 1. If you copy and paste your resume it may not appear the way you expected. Their email preferences aren't the same as yours. That could result in your resume looking sloppy. 2. The attachment you send may be a file type they can't open or they may have images blocked in their email. 3. Don't worry about an employer being concerned about getting a virus. I can't think of any email provider that doesn't come with virus detection. 4. They most likely have virus protection software on their computer. 5. Lastly, your best option for sending your resume is as an attachment in the format of a PDF. They are the most stable file format for sending text attachments. Everyone can open them. Good luck.
2 people like this
• India
5 Jan 07
Thanq for your valuable advise. I generally attach my resume when applying for a job. Even though I found a column like "PASTE YOUR RESUME HERE" I wouldn't care for that. At that time I was confused why they ask to paste and to upload the resume. But now I got an answer for my question. Thank you, Thank you very must. From now onwards I prefer to paste my resume.
1 person likes this
@kgwat70 (13392)
• United States
5 Jan 07
You are very welcome though you can still do it as an attachment if the employer requests that you do it that way. If they do not, then I would copy and paste your resume into your email.
@Lydia1901 (16353)
• United States
9 Jan 07
I didn't know that. I usually do whatever they ask me to do.
1 person likes this