autism

United States
January 10, 2007 9:21am CST
does anyone have a child with autism or at least know anyone who has autism?My 4 year old son has autism and does well communicating now after therapy,but he gets so frustrated over little things and he will scream at the top of his lungs out of the blue,if you have any tips for me on redirecting please give me your sectrets
1 person likes this
4 responses
@mari61960 (4895)
• United States
12 Jan 07
I don't know if it's the same thing but.. I had an adult family home and one of the gentlemen that lived with me was autistic and a genius. He was basically non verbal 90% of the time. He would give short answers ie yes, no, etc. On rare occaisions he would actually hold up his end of the conversation. There were times when for months he would be getting out and actually talkiing and going to school etc. He had many "breakdowns". Anyway he would sometimes just let loose with what we referred to as "The Primal Scream" he would just scream and scream and then stop. As if nothing happened. He would be in his own mind so asking him about it did no good. I noticed that sometimes he had asked for ativan just before this happened. One day when he seemed fairly verbal, I asked if he knew why he screamed. He said "I am anxious and over pushed" He then paced around the kitchen for an hour and didn't speak again for 3 days. My point now after I got all wrapped up in this was could it be anxiety ?
2 people like this
• United States
12 Jan 07
Thank you so much for taking the time to give me this info
1 person likes this
@kittykatzz (1133)
• United States
12 Jan 07
hi there kimber!.. there are so many of us affected by autism nowadays, although that doesnt make it any less unsettling for us parents almost even moreso.. my son Andy is 9 and is autistic.. screaming for him used to seem like one of his "normal" bodily functions... the only thing i could ever do is try to hold him to comfort him (although this did commonly result in bruises to my body, from his thrashing) i would just try to overpower him and rock him and say "im here" "im here" and "moms gonna help Andy" over and over again.. he doesnt seem to scream anymore for no reason, but his typical day to day IS filled with odd "grunting" noises.. so its almost turned into "yelling" instead.. i still cant really stop him completely when he gets going,, only try to determine through trial and error what it is that hes trying to get through to me.. sometimes it might be that he cant find a video game or something is "lost" other times he may have a stomach ache.. but i dont always get to know..it always makes us feel better as parent when we are able to soothe out childrens discomfort,..with autistic kids we unfortunately have no other choice but to come to terms withthe fact that were just not going to be able to sometimes.. its easier at home than in public.. imsorry i dont have a "one liner" with advice to help you.. beleive me i wish i did for both of our sakes.. the best i can do is tell you that the more communication skills he learns over time, the less frustrated he will hopefully be in the future.
1 person likes this
• United States
13 Jan 07
I agree completely this sounds just like my son,and yes he is much more relaxed at home than in public of course,but thank you so much its so nice to hear others go through the same day to day life as I do
• Indonesia
12 Jan 07
My personal opinion is that hormonal theories are gaining in recognition and seem to account for many of the symptoms of autism: my favourite is Simon Baron-Cohen's theory of 'the extreme male brain',in which higher than normal levels of testosterone in the uterous (prenatally) make a person display autism. I would seriously recommend his book 'Men, women,and the extreme male brain' (2003): it is really really accessible and very interesting- it relates autism to normal functioning
1 person likes this
• United States
12 Jan 07
I will check this out thank you so very much
1 person likes this
• Philippines
13 Jan 07
My brother have a child with autism,they treat this like a normal child,they spend money for the therapy,the child also go to school,they maintain the normal caring,right now he can operate his own TV,Radio,and most of the time he like to play card's.
• United States
13 Jan 07
I really do think that is key- treating them (in SO `many ways) like they are a normal child. I have two kids, ages 3 and 4 1/2. My 3 yr old is on the spectrum, and he is the one with the melt downs ALL the time. He is very hard to console, has a hard time transitioning, is very emotional, etc.. it's hard to deal with a lot of the time, and some days I just feel like I have no clue how to handle him. BUT aside from that, aside from the obvious "quirks" that make him "Autistic", he really is no different from my other child. Do the therapy and whatever else is necessary to give them what they need to communicate and function, but just because they are attached to this word "Autism", does not mean they're "bad", or "less than", or "broken" or something. :)
• United States
13 Jan 07
I totally agree,I do treat him the same as his siblings but its unsetteling when my other children have friends over and my little guy starts his screaming,getting in faces.The others that dont live with this everyday get anoid and ask me to tell him to stop this behavior.all I can do tell them a little bit about autism and that he wont stop.