How do if a school monitored what is brought in home luches?

@jmcafam (2891)
United States
January 17, 2007 6:31pm CST
My nephews school, I guess checks, the childrens school home lunches.They only allow nutricous lunches.How do you feel about this? Would you want to be told you could not send certain foods for you child because the school does not feel the child should eat them. This is a public school.
1 person likes this
8 responses
@judyt00 (3504)
• Canada
18 Jan 07
They did that in the schools my kids wentto as well, and they do in my grandsons' school. I think the problem liesin what the monitor considers nutritious. I was forever being called into the school to explain why I thought Oatmeal , rice pudding or home made muffins were more nutritious than a p-nut butter and jam sandwich. and heaven forbid when I filled the kids thermos with a nice thick stew or soup and a slice of bread and butter. I can understand alergies like p-nut butter, but not to force kids to conform to what everybody else eats.
• Canada
18 Jan 07
I agree that stew, especially homemade stews are a great lunch. Schools differ city to city, and I assume that you are in the states as I haven't looked at your profile yet, but here, stew is a definite ok at the schools.
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@candygurl24 (1880)
• Canada
18 Jan 07
In my daughter's school, the monitors do walk around to make sure that the children are properly fed. They make sure it is not "junk", as in chocolate, cookies, cake and candy etc. I totally agree with this, and most parents should too. There is such an uproar about child obesity, yet some parents continue to let their children eat whatever they want to. Children require guidance, and believe it or not, they crave it. I don't think it's right to consider stews etc. which contain healthy ingredients as junk, but if you saw what some kids brought for lunch you'd be shocked! As for some children, they don't get a lunch, and that is horrifying. My daughter's school also offers healthy meals to be bought there, for a very reasonable price, and if a student goes without a lunch, they receive a lunch and the parents are tabbed for the costs throughout the year. We can't be there to make sure that our children eat well, but thank god that some schools care enough to provide monitors.
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@lilaclady (28236)
• Australia
18 Jan 07
I don't have kids but I know I would not be able to handle school taking control of what you feed your children, lunch break is time out from school and should not have anything to do with them, they should do more of what they are supposed to be doing and maybe the kids of today may get a better education.
• Canada
18 Jan 07
Lunch monitors aren't usually teachers in schools around here, and if your child stays for lunch at the school, then yes, they should have something to do with it. They are still under the care of the school, so you can't say that they shouldn't make sure that your child is eating well. That's just horrible.
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@emeraldisle (13145)
• United States
16 Feb 07
I know our schools here do not allow any carbonated drinks in. Some of the monitors though can get very fussy and think that just because it's in a can it's carbonated. My neice got into trouble once for taking a can of orange juice in for lunch. We had to call and get it straightened out. That's one reason I have aproblem with them monitoring lunches brought from home. Who decides what is considered nutricious? Who says what is acceptable or not? When you look at what some of the schools serve the kids for lunch personally I don't think they can say what is nutricious. It seems to be a double standard that they can feed them what they want to, which often includes things that aren't the healthiest, but a parent has to go buy their rules of good food? I don't think so and I'd let the school know how I feel on it too.
• United States
20 Jan 07
Since I do have school age children I have to say that I would not like for the school to tell me what I can and can not send for my child to eat. Who would know better what their child likes to eat than the mother. Also what if you and your child have discussed a certain thing to eat. My daughter and I like to sit and pick out what she is going to have for the week. How would you tell your child sorry the school does not want you to eat that. I would not like it at all.
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@shywolf (4520)
• United States
20 Jan 07
Wow. I hadn't ever thought about a school doing this. There was a news story in Britain in the past year about a school that decided that they were only going to _serve_ nutritous food. Some parents caved in to their children's wishes and would bring their children food at lunchtime from like a local fast food sort of a place or something. It was just tidiculous, the parents who were outraged about the school's decision were actually lined up at the school taking orders from the kids and going and buying the food and handing it to them through the bars of the fence around the school. LOL... I don't know. I really think that it's good in a way that your nephew's school is trying to help with the kid's nutrition, but still.. it is kind of an invasion of privacy, in another way...
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• United States
18 Jan 07
I think that it is a good way to ensure that kids are eating well. My only question is that if a child's lunch is deemed "non-nutritious" does the school provide a free meal?
• United States
18 Jan 07
I think it is great. My kids school has for a MAIN MEAL breadsticks and nachos. HOW is that healthy??? I wish they would do it.
1 person likes this