Bible Translations

United States
January 25, 2007 3:46pm CST
Do you read the Bible? If so, what translation do you use? What is your opinion on paraphrased translations (like the Living Bible)? In my opinion, I think that certain translations are a little scary. Some completely omit verses (the New International Version is missing at least 40 verses, like Mark 7:16 and 11:26). Some churches claim that the Bible is the literal word of God and then turn around and suggest members use the Living Bible for Bible study. Since it is a paraphrased translation, doesn't that seem odd? I myself have read and use the KJV, but also have copies of a few of the newer translations. The KJV is also a translation and probably has issues to since translations never quite seem to catch the full meaning of the original.
6 people like this
19 responses
• Philippines
26 Jan 07
I am a translator of the Word of God from Greek to English and I have already published THE WILL New Testament (Greek to English), GENESIS & EXODUS (Greek to English), and some others shown at http://www.lulu.com/arseniajoaquin I translate the Word of God PLAINLY - that is from the Greek word to its corresponding English equivalent and therefore my translations are very much different from the existing versions of the Holy Bible circulating around the world. I hope you visit the site and see the description and details and I hope you could acquire some of them.
@kiwimac (323)
• New Zealand
26 Jan 07
Can I ask what your qualifications are to do this? I'm just interested in knowing.
• Philippines
26 Jan 07
I am a Christian, a child of God. God gives spiritual gifts to each of His children. After baptism into Christ, I was given the gift of knowledge and understanding Bible Greek. I hope you compare my translations with the versions we have now. By the way, the German Bible Society gave me the permission to translate THE GREEK NEW TESTAMENT, Second Edition and Fourth Revised Edition. I hope that you look at the works and not my person. I hope that we study the Word of God objectively.
1 person likes this
• United States
27 Jan 07
I will check out the site. Thanks for sharing.
@kiwimac (323)
• New Zealand
26 Jan 07
All English bibles are translations of documents we no longer have the originals of. Although archaeologists have found some early scrolls that are versions of the scriptures no one has ever found the whole, complete autograph. Having said that, the great majority of modern translations are very, very close to what we imagine the originals to have been. Further the very act of translation means that something is always lost in the process. Bibles, generally, come in two kinds, a word-for-word translation, such as the New American Standard Bible or a thought for thought translation such as the NIV. Neither way of translation is better than the other, word-for-word translations tend to be more accurate but harder to read while thought-for-thought translations are easier to read but less accurate. The King James Version was a good one FOR ITS TIME but since then we have discovered older manuscripts than the KJV translator's had access to and it is those manuscripts which have helped us see where the KJV translators added things to the text, so instead of the NIV taking verses away, it was the KJV which added them in the first place. Paraphrases such as the Living Bible or the Good News or the Common English Version or even the Message are really good for folk who are just starting out, they are also quite excellent for folk for whom English is a second language. All in all the Bible that is best is the one which speaks to your condition, which deepens your relationship with God and your fellow human-beings. kiwimac
• United States
26 Jan 07
If your reasoning for the NIV and KJV differences are true, why does the NIV skip the verse number? Well, as I type this the answer comes to mind... Being that I guess it could be so that comparing verses translation to translation would be easier. As for the Bible version that speaks to your condition and builds your relationship to God and other people being the best, I agree only up to a certain extent. Some people scavenge through numerous translations to find exact words that best suit what they are doing. If you favor a translation only for a certain verse and then another for another and yet more translations again for only certain exact wordings, is that not in some way marginalizing the value of the translation? I say this because I know of a christian author who quotes the bible heavily in their writings, but pulls from at least 7 different translations in the book I just finished reading. The author uses these quotes to highlight his message (his as in the author's, not His as in God) to the point he puts certain words from the verse in italics to further point them out as to say that because those words match the author's words they somehow better justify the author's words. Seemed a little strange to me.
• Philippines
26 Jan 07
I just want to say that among the many versions that I have seen, NIV is the worst.
1 person likes this
@kiwimac (323)
• New Zealand
27 Jan 07
I would generally disagree, The NIV does have some areas of weakness but then it is a thought-for-thought translation and thus less accurate than say the NASB. Doesn't make it a bad translation though. Some of the best and brightest of Biblical translators worked on that version, men and women who were called of God. I am not suggesting that these folk are beyond criticism but I AM suggesting that the criticism be contructive. You say it is the worst translation, in your opinion, why? What is it that makes it so bad? Do you have examples, can we look at the Greek and see how the translation is wrong in your mind? Kiwimac
@mobyfriend (1019)
• Netherlands
26 Jan 07
I'm using the Concordant Literal New Testament with the the Keyword Concordance. A direct transaltion from the Greek. This means that if word is translatend it is not transalted different in another place. Adn that happens sometimes using different translations for the same word.
2 people like this
@kiwimac (323)
• New Zealand
26 Jan 07
The Concordant Literal NT is an excellent example of a word-for-word translation. I find it really very useful.
• United States
26 Jan 07
One issue though with a word for word translation is that those older languages that those original texts were written in were composed of far fewer words. The words context changes based on other words they are associated with. I may be wrong on this though as I am not a scholar of these ancient languages.
@kiwimac (323)
• New Zealand
26 Jan 07
Unfortunately that is impossible to do anything about. Word-for-Word translations do try but all languages have concepts that don't translate literally, an example is the French saying " O La la!", try translating that literally and all you get is gibberish. The most a translator can do is to try and find the nearest equivalent and hope that it is not too wrong.
• United States
26 Jan 07
I read the KJV and sometimes the NIV version to compare. I believe God tells us what he wants us to know when we read. The more I read things over and over the more he tells me.
2 people like this
• United States
27 Jan 07
I agree... The more you read over the Bible (and other things for that matter) the more you discover and understand.
• Philippines
4 Feb 07
I hope you include my translations - THE WILL New Testament (Greek to English), and GENESIS & EXODUS (Greek to English) which are found at http://www.lulu.com/arseniajoaquin I have published some other books which I hope could help people understand the Word of God and be saved. Salvation is the simple message of God which so many people could not understand and so I also published ELEMENTS of SALVATION, The Right Way, GOD, ORIGIN, TRANSFER into PERFECTION, and others found at the website indicated above.
@suspenseful (40312)
• Canada
26 Jan 07
I read the Bible and I use the KJV. I consider it the most accurate. I read a bit about how the predecessors to the NIV came about, that it came from another Greek translation that was rather well preserved for its age, unlike the one that the KJV and previous translations came from. It would have been almost destroyed by many people reading it, and they would have had to make copies. I believe that since the KJV came from the Bishops Bible and the Genevan Bible, and these were revisions of other Bibles before them, and so on back to the past, the scholars who worked on them did not exactly had to start from scratch and they go back to the original Greek translation.
• Philippines
26 Jan 07
THE WILL New Testament (Greek to English) is a translation of THE GREEK NEW TESTAMENT, Second Edition and Fourth Revised Edition, the copyright of which is owned by the German Bible Society which gave me the permission to translate. They are consistently undertaking researches and if there be any mistake in it, my translation follows. But this is more accepted than the other one (there are only two of them). GENESIS & EXODUS (Greek to English) is translated from the Septuagint also known as LXX or Greek Old Testament. Allegedly, there's no copyright owner and anybody may translate it and so do I. Apparently, Bible Societies and other religious organizations have their own research and publish their versions now circulating around the world.
1 person likes this
@luzamper (1358)
• Philippines
27 Jan 07
I hope that we could get the real God's message from the translations.
3 people like this
@smkwan2007 (1036)
• Hong Kong
26 Jan 07
Bible was originally written in Hebrew. It is an ancient language, very few people now know how to read passages written with it. Translation of the bible is not easy. There are ar least 6 kinds of translation approach. Paraphrase is one of them. Scholars maintain that using just paraphrase approach to interpret the Bible may bring forth misleading texts. They believe selecting more than one translation approach is useful in getting the meaning inside the scripture. But some hold an idea that paraphrase may be suitable to be employed for grasping the initial meaning of a passage.
@manong05 (5029)
• Philippines
26 Jan 07
The Old Testament was written in Hebrew and partly in Aramaic while the New Testament was written in Koine Greek, the lingua franca of that time.
1 person likes this
• Philippines
26 Jan 07
When I started translating, I didn't know anything about translation approach. I just wanted the Word of God translated from Greek to English - Greek word to its corresponding English equvalent. Now that I come across some translation approach, I found out that paraphrase is very misleading and dangerous to use as it may lead to wrong understanding of the Word. The PLAIN translation which I adopted is very beautiful and true as we see how God express Himself. I followed both the Greek and English grammar and I just supplied English words for grammar purposes which are all written in italics to identify them (readers may remove them if they so desire). I hope that you compare my translations with the versions circulating around the world.
• United States
26 Jan 07
i use the parallel bible that i got from TBN. one on side of the page its KJV and the other side its the new living version. i really really like it.
2 people like this
• United States
26 Jan 07
The idea of translations in the same book is quite interesting, espcially since one of those versions is a paraphrase instead of a more literal translation.
1 person likes this
@sbeauty (5869)
• United States
26 Jan 07
I'm sure that any Bible translation has inaccuracies from the original texts just because all of them, including the King James version were translated by fallible human beings. I really don't think God cares which version we read as long as we read it. There is plenty of material in every translation to keep us occupied for a lifetime without worrying about whether a few verses are missing. Will those verses really change the course of our lives? How are we sure that the King James translator was totally accurate, anyway? All of this has to be done on faith that the people who did whatever translation we choose did a good job.
1 person likes this
@gifana (4834)
• Portugal
26 Jan 07
I agree wholeheartedly. We all can get what we need from the Bible. While we don't translate it we surely do interpret each in his own way.
• United States
27 Jan 07
I agree with your statements up to a point. Some people twist individual words that may or may not appear across all translations to justify acts that are evil.
@superbaaz (133)
• India
26 Jan 07
U SHUD read the old testament but it is not a word of god i can prove this by any way scientifically also only the holy book QURAN IS THE BOOk of the god and i challenge no one can prove this is incorrect and don't get me wrong we all love jesus but i deny the fact he is god or son of god.be bold and check on the net for ISLAMIC RESEARCH FOUNDATION TO GET ALL THE ANSWERS also u can check for PEACE CHANNEL on t.v.
• United States
27 Jan 07
I have read the Quran also. It is my understanding from the Quran that is states that the Torah and the Gospels are also the word of god, the of course the exception of the disagreement on Jesus being god or a prophet. Maybe it does not directly state that they are the word of god but it does state that if one follows the Torah or the Gospels that they too will go to heaven.
• India
27 Jan 07
certain facts and beliefs of the quran are given in bible-torah and other books and we love to agree on that part but not on the whole b'cos simple reason that no one can prove it is a word of god and other the book is crypted and the teachings cannot be proved.
@winter18 (19)
• Philippines
26 Jan 07
I prefer the KJV because it's the original translation. I grew up in a Christian school and we memorize verses every week using KJV. Up to now, it's still in my memory. I also read the NIV, I am not aware that some verses are missing. I still use KJV when memorizing verses.
1 person likes this
• United States
26 Jan 07
Open up your NIV to Mark 7:16 or Mark 11:26. From the KJV Mark 7:16 "If any man have ears to hear, let him hear." Mark 11:26 "But if ye do not forgive, neither will your Father which is in heaven forgive your trespasses."
@venshida (4837)
• United States
26 Jan 07
I read the Bible, the King James Version. I hate when I go to church and they read the translated version.
• China
26 Jan 07
if there is transaltion, there will be missings or omissions, I think. But It doesn't matter what version we are using. We are reading Bibles and Learning Bibles, we are on the way to search the essence of Bible. The different version are just forms, and the meaning of these words are the essence. It the essence is there, I don't mind what version I am reading and learning.
1 person likes this
@manong05 (5029)
• Philippines
26 Jan 07
Reading the Bible in different translations is helpful because you can get the different shades of meaning of the original word. It is a must for a serious Bible study. But reading just for inspirational purposes, newer translations in plain English is sufficient enough. Paraphrase editions use the priciple of dynamic equivalence in translation, they translate not only the words but more especially the thoughts of the verses in order for it to be more understandable to the modern reader. Another principle is the use of formal equivalence, the literal translation of the words.
@7nicole1 (1634)
• Canada
26 Jan 07
I have reallt trie dto follow with the bible but to me it makes no sense. This bible has been around for centuries how do we know whats in the text really happened after so many years of being updated and added to. I don't think we will ever know the true way the bible came to be.
• Philippines
4 Feb 07
I am an author and translator to the Word of God from Greek to English. Before I undertook the translation work, I have studied the Holy Bible, how it came about, etc. I have started a discussion entitled Holy Bible which gives some backgrounder of the Holy Bible. Anybody who wants to be informed about the Holy Bible may please go to my Profile and open the topic Holy Bible.
@OROKAM55 (121)
• United States
26 Jan 07
I study religious education with concentration in Christian education up to a masters level. King James version of the Bible still remains the accurate translation of the bible. the only problem with the King James version today is the issue of English. As you might have known, English is not a stable language. The English language spoken in King James' time most of them are no longer relevant in our modern world. The most modern and accurate translation of the Bible in existence today is the (NIV) New International Version of the Bible. Living Bible, Good News Bible and other parphrased translations are only good for some kind of simplicity. Some of their interpretations are not accurate but their own opinions of what they think the bible is saying. They might be right and they might be wrong in their interpretations and opinions. Those kind of translations are not reliable and in some instance not accurate
• Philippines
4 Feb 07
I see that you have compared some versions. I am an author and translator of the Word of God from Greek to English. I hope that you include my translations - THE WILL New Testament (Greek to English), and GENESIS & EXODUS (Greek to English) which are found at http://www.lulu.com/arseniajoaquin I have published some other books which I hope could help people understand the Word of God and be saved. Salvation is the simple message of God which so many people could not understand and so I also published ELEMENTS of SALVATION, The Right Way, GOD, ORIGIN, TRANSFER into PERFECTION, and others found at the website indicated above.
@Celanith (2334)
• United States
26 Jan 07
I personally prefer the New King James Bible and am looking for Extra Large Print in that version.
@KrauseHome (36682)
• United States
26 Jan 07
Yes, I read the Bible, and believe it to be the Word of God for all times, and you cannot go wrong in reading the Bible. I own a KJV bible, and find this the best one in my opinion. It is the one I have grown up being around, and personally even though it might be the hardest to understand for many, it is the one I prefer.
• United States
26 Jan 07
I use the King James Version. I think that some of the other versions take things out of context when they translate it their way. I do think, especially for people that are just starting to read the bible, that they have a very good Amplified Bible so that they can get a clearer understanding of something that they don't understand. It would be best for someone to ask their pastor what version they would choose as the best for them to use in their studies.
• Indonesia
26 Jan 07
Some people do concern about the Bible translation. Perhabs I am the one who doesn't pay much, attention? lol I read KJV, NIV and translation in my own language. I do think that there might be some lost in translation here and there. But when I read the Bible, I just read it as it is, meditate for a while and ask The Holy spirit of the understanding He wants me to accept or receive.