Can Obama rely on majority of votes from the black community?

Philippines
February 11, 2007 10:36pm CST
Do you think Senator Obama can rely heavily on the black community for majority of votes? Or do you think that not all black folks would instantly vote for him?
2 people like this
3 responses
• United States
12 Feb 07
Ever since reading Obama's memoirs I have hoped that he would someday run for president. I did not think it would be this soon, but I say more power to him. I think he should go for it and I think he will get a lot of support from the black community, but also from many other groups of Americans who think he would best represent their interests. It is of course time for someone other than a WASP(White, Anglo-Saxon Protestant) to be in the Whitehouse, but that is not the only reason I like Obama. He is a charismatic leader and he speaks intelligently and with passion. He is not afraid to criticize institutions and policies that he is unhappy with. And he has integrity. I would be proud to vote for him, even though I usually never vote Democrat.
1 person likes this
@Idlewild (6094)
• United States
21 Feb 07
From what I've heard Clinton has a lot more support among blacks than Obama does. Of course, Clinton is well known from her years as first lady, and Bill Clinton was very popular with blacks. Obama is still a relative unknown, even among blacks. As more blacks get to know him he'll get more support from that community, though they may favor Clinton's experience.
• Philippines
22 Feb 07
Hi idlewild! Wow, really? Clinton has more support from the Black community? And I even thought that the Black community would have more inclination to vote for Obama.
@lilaidi (155)
• United States
24 Feb 07
I think that the media is portraying the black community as being more for Clinton than Obama because they are relying on an early poll. I have visited some black forums and many people on there said that they plan on supporting Obama, and others said that it really depends on the issues. I, myself am black and I have attended one of Obama's rallies here in Los Angeles and there were plenty of black people there along with other races. It was a mixed crowd. I think some black just may have to be educated about him because if they are not really into politics then it may seem strange seeing a new face and not knowing what he's about. But the more that he keeps speaking, the more the real issues will come up and other blacks who do not know of him will probably change up their decisions.
@soccermom (3200)
• United States
15 Feb 07
I too am a big Obama fan. I don't think he can rely on the "black" vote. There has been big discussions lately about is he black enough? Which is rather unfortunate, we as a country never ask "is he white enough?" of any other politican. I think many black people will look at his light skin, the way he speaks and his educational background and maybe not identify with him. However, I've also noticed there is not a huge percentage of black voters. I am not saying this because I'm prejudiced, the fact is that enough effort has not been made to teach minorities the power of a vote. Maybe Obama will be able to change all that.
• Philippines
19 Feb 07
Hi soccermom, thanks for your response. It's interesting to note the question of race/color --- yes, I don't think Americans EVER ask if whether or not someone is ever white enough. I do hope that come election day, the voters look at integrity, capacity to serve and political will.
@Idlewild (6094)
• United States
21 Feb 07
I think with Obama it's not so much that he's light-skinned, but the fact that he grew up in Africa and other places and so didn't have the experience of growing up in the U.S. and experiencing the racial problems that many blacks face. Obama has definitely been an outsider most places he's lived, but has not had the same experiences of growing up in a neighborhood with few economic opportunities, or being a young black man being pulled over by the police, etc. I've heard some black voters mention these type of things in interviews.