James Clavell

@pagibig (298)
Philippines
February 12, 2007 1:42am CST
What's your favorite James Clavell Book? Mine is shogun. because it depicts the life and ways of a samurai. and it has everything a story could ever need. politics, conflict, romance, drama, action. everything!!!! if you haven't read it yet, i recommend that you do. For those who have read any james clavell book, what's your favorite and why? give us a summary of the plot, but don't give out any 'conclusions'. thank you.
1 person likes this
7 responses
• United States
12 Feb 07
The only one I've read is Shogun, and it's one of my favorite books precisely for the reasons you stated. I checked out Gai-Jin (I think, either that or Tai-pei) from the library, read about 2 pages, and took it back. I just wasn't in the mood for it, I guess. I wanted something more fromt the feudal era, not the opening of the borders era. Unless someone tells me I should read it...
@pagibig (298)
• Philippines
12 Feb 07
For Clavell's Asian Saga in order of best to worst, not that the worst isn't any good.. they are all REALLY good actually... but if you happen to read Clavell again, i'd recommend (and this is just my own opinion) 1. Shogun 2. Noble House (basically because, this time it's set on a modern time... almost close to present time, and it's kinda cool how 'hong kong' was being run before. if you like shogun, this for me is like the present time adaptation of shogun with their political tactics translated to business tactics. 3. King Rat 4. Tai-pan 5. Gai-jin 6. Whirlwind but i suggest you read some other books in between, the asian saga books are REALLY long... you might get tired of the same style of writing and storytelling...
@didi13 (2925)
• Romania
30 Mar 11
Interest in Japan was prompted in large part anime, recently urged me to have a look on paper and Shogun, a novel with universal resonance in literature which have been said and I needed to read it. I am still far from the finished, but I want to express an objective view of the novel. Primarily reflects a mentality and customs of civilization with its more or less noble, but not limited to that. It is a novel broad and complex as the structure and meaning, not recommended at an early age, reading it requires attention and interest from our side. Japanese history is mirrored in these pages in a new, impressive for occidental audiences. A move into that world and integrating novel implied subject.
@Tantrums (948)
• Philippines
3 Oct 09
Shogun??? This is the best book in the world. Well at least for me. , I enjoyed yeading this. The pages is 2.5 inches thick and the font size are so small but I never skipped a page on this book. The setting is Medieval Japan. The nation is on the brink of war and caught in the middle is an english ship pilot who will influence the culture of japan and help a future shogun his kingdom.
@adonze (8)
• United States
2 Jun 09
I read Shogun to make my husband and mother-in-law happy (how Japanese of me). I LOVED the book! Since then I have rented the mini series; which was the only mini series aside from "The Stand" that I thought followed closely to the book. (With one exception: Blackthorn looses his sight instead of his hearing in the movie. Since then I have tried to read Tia-Pan. I read a few chapters, but it did not catch me the way Shogun did. It is my favorite book. I did see the movie on HBO; it was good. I think I should try to read it again. I don't know who historically accurate it is. I DO know that Shogun is pretty close to what happened during the Tokagawara era. (I'm not sure on the spelling.)
@Randync (544)
• United States
12 Feb 07
I would have to go with Shogun as well. I love anything historical anyway and this was a very good book. Following his journey to being samurai was a good read.
@steerpyke (396)
12 Feb 07
Shogan is the only one of his that I have read but it was a brilliant book.
@steerpyke (396)
12 Feb 07
Shogan is the only one of his that I have read but it was a brilliant book.