Make up your own definition for the word Carbohydrate.

United States
October 13, 2006 5:07pm CST
Here's my go at it- Carbohydrate:The action of when a car gets drenched with water by a clown named bozo. You like how I broke that down?
1 response
@pontgtp (970)
• United States
16 Oct 06
Carbohydrates are molecules that contain oxygen, hydrogen, and carbon atoms. They may also contain other elements such as sulfur or nitrogen, but these are usually minor components. They consist of monosaccharide sugars, of varying chain lengths, that have the general chemical formula Cn(H2O)n or are derivatives of such.The smallest value for n is 3. A 3-carbon sugar is referred to as a triose, whereas a 6-carbon sugar is called a hexose (see monosaccharides below). Certain carbohydrates are important for storing and transporting energy in most organisms, including plants and animals, and are major structural elements in many organisms (eg cellulose in plants). In addition they play major roles in cell to cell communication, the immune system, fertilization, pathogenesis, blood clotting, and development. Carbohydrates can be classified by the number of constituent sugar units: monosaccharides (such as glucose and fructose), disaccharides (such as sucrose and lactose), oligosaccharides, and polysaccharides (such as starch, glycogen, and cellulose). Glucose as a straight-chain carbohydrate (Fischer projection) Enlarge Glucose as a straight-chain carbohydrate (Fischer projection) Fructose (Fischer projection) Enlarge Fructose (Fischer projection) Pure carbohydrates contain carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen atoms, in a 1:2:1 molar ratio, giving the general formula Cn(H2O)n. (This applies only to monosaccharides, see below, although all carbohydrates have the more general formula Cn(H2O)m.) However, many important carbohydrates deviate from this, such as deoxyribose and glycerol. Sometimes compounds containing other elements are also counted as carbohydrates (e.g. glucosamine and chitin, which contain nitrogen). The simplest carbohydrates are monosaccharides, which are small straight-chain aldehydes and ketones with many hydroxyl groups added, usually one on each carbon except the functional group. Other carbohydrates are composed of monosaccharide units and break down under hydrolysis. These may be classified as disaccharides, oligosaccharides, or polysaccharides, depending on whether they have two, several, or many monosaccharide units
• United States
16 Oct 06
Um, wow. or you could of just had fun with it.