Birth control for men-will men go for this?

United States
March 12, 2007 12:49pm CST
According to a health article I read online this morning, a male birth control pill may be available for men in the next 10-12 years. The article on msn health stated that scientists have been working on a male birth control pill since the 1970's. Some of the obstacles to producing a male birth control pill has been finding the right hormonal combination that will work for men to prevent fertility in men. Secondly, finding financial support for this type of contraception has been hard to obtain because of the perception of a lack of interest from the public. They may be right about the lack of interest. The article also stated that a recent poll by msn-Zogby of American men revealed that only 13% of men said they would use a male birth control pill. Among both genders 36% of the respondents said that their current birth control methods are fine for them. There seems to be a lot of resistance. What do you think? When and if this becomes available would you use this product or encourage the men in your life to use the product?
3 people like this
8 responses
@ginagee (843)
12 Mar 07
Men have enough trouble putting a rubber on and they only do that when absolutely necessary. There should be more men having vascetomys - why does it always have to be women getting sterilised?? So do I think they'll take a pill - no, I don't think there'll be many who will do that either. I'm sure if men gave birth they'd soon insist that they'd have to take precautions!!!
• United States
12 Mar 07
Historically men have not had the burden of responsibility for birth control. I think it will be surprising to see men suddenly willing to take this seriously.
1 person likes this
@MarkyB21 (1545)
12 Mar 07
I've read about some research into opinions about male birth control pills and many men feel that their virility would be put in doubt by taking the pill - this is ridiculous really but could be a big enough problem to stop it ever becoming a popular choice. Even if that doesn't stop it, I don't know how many women would trust a man to have taken the pill and not just say they had. I think the main candidate for this type of pill will be the men that don't trust women to take their pill as many men fear being 'tricked' into having a child.
2 people like this
• United States
12 Mar 07
The problem is, is that I'm the one that gets pregnant. I don't know if I trust a man with the birth control responsibility.
2 people like this
@Kowgirl (3490)
• United States
14 Mar 07
If this birth control for men has side effects like the birth control that women take, the men will say HEL* NO! I'm not going to risk my life taking that. And anyway they aren't the ones who can get pregnant so they think it is the womans responsibility, not theirs. There will be some who are willing to try it but I don't think there will be many.
1 person likes this
• United States
13 Mar 07
no , why would he. he is not the one gaining weight. his ankles dont swell to the size of watermelons. he is able to tie his own shoes. and he doesnt have to go through hour of pain during labor.
@junior07 (973)
• India
13 Mar 07
i think if those pills are safe for men then there is no reason why they can't adopt them.
1 person likes this
@byfaithonly (10715)
• United States
12 Mar 07
I read a similar article and from what I understand, very few men are going to be willing to "take their pill". I say all the women on birthcontrol should cut their men off until they share in the responsibility - I'm past the age but I know when I was on the pill I gained a lot of weight, as soon as I went off I lost like 20 pounds.
@shalwani (760)
• Pakistan
13 Mar 07
Forty-year-old Scott Hardin says he’s glad that men may soon have a new choice when it comes to birth control. But, he adds, he would not even consider taking a male hormonal contraceptive. Hardin is like many men who are pleased to hear they may have a new option but are wary of taking any type of hormones. “I would rather rely on a solution that doesn’t involving medicating myself and the problems women have had with hormone therapy doesn’t make me anxious to want to sign on to taking a hormone-type therapy,” says Hardin, who is single and a college administrator. For the first time, a safe, effective and reversible hormonal male contraceptive appears to be within reach. Several formulations are expected to become commercially available within the near future. Men may soon have the options of a daily pill to be taken orally, a patch or gel to be applied to the skin, an injection given every three months or an implant placed under the skin every 12 months, according to Seattle researchers. “It largely depends on how funding continues. The technology is there. We know how it would work,” says Dr. Andrea Coviello, who is helping to test several male contraceptives at the Population Center for Research in Reproduction at the University of Washington in Seattle. Coviello and her colleagues have found that a male contraceptive that releases testosterone over three months is potentially a safe and practical method of contraception. The Seattle researchers have been testing a sustained-released, testosterone micro-capsule, which consists of a thick liquid administered by injection under the skin. “I never had any real noticeable side effects. I didn’t notice any mood changes. I may have put on a little weight,” says Larry Setlow, a 39-year-old computer programmer with a small software company in Seattle. He has taken part in three male hormonal contraceptive clinical trials at the University of Washington and has received both pills and injections. “They all worked really well and I was able to look at my lab results and see my sperm count drop to zero,” says Setlow.