Do you wish to avoid the e coli and other dangers?

@Willowlady (10665)
United States
March 15, 2007 3:09pm CST
One of the greatest personalities ever in 27 years living in the Albuquerque, New Mexico, area was Hazel Parcells, who taught nutrition and healing in a variety of ways. But one of her most basic methods was her Parcells Oxygen Soak. The research being done indicates that "organic" produce often contains amounts of natural pesticides produced by the plants themselves when stressed by weather or insect invasions. So even organic produce can contain pesticides. The Parcells Oxygen Soak is the answer to buying the best produce you can find, preferably organic, then cleansing it to revitalize it, remove pesticides, toxins, chemicals, fungi, and bacteria, including bioterrorism threats. And with today's e-coli and staph threats, this simple inexpensive method of cleansing and revitalizing food is a must to safeguard your family's health. The Parcells Oxygen Soak can revive foods, remove pesticides, toxins, chemicals, and fungi and bacteria from food, as well as help preserve food in your refrigerator for much longer. Around the world, it is the essential means of sanitizing food in out-of-the-way places. Foods include:Eggs (the porous shells can absorb pesticides and salmonella) Meats (which can be a heavy carrier of toxic materials: growth hormones, antibiotics and poisons in the foods that animals consume) Fruits and vegetables, including sprouts and herbs The benefits of this oxygen food treatment are:- Fruits, herbs and vegetables will keep longer - The wilted will return to a fresh crispness - Colors will restore (unless soaked longer than recommended times) - Flavor and texture will be enhanced - Meat, fish and foul will be tenderized - Dangerous additives will have been removed. Recipe & Application Add 1 teaspoon of Clorox™ bleach to 1 gallon of water. Separate foods into the following groups and soak for indicated time (mix fresh soaking water for each group): Leafy vegetables- 5-10 minutes Root and heavy-fiber vegetables- 10-15 minutes Fruits, thin-skinned fruits (berries)- 5 minutes Fruits, medium-skinned (peaches, apricots)- 10 minutes Fruits, thick-skinned (apples, citrus)- 10-15 minutes Eggs- 20-30 minutes Meat/poultry/ fish, thawed- 10 minutes per pound Meat/poultry/ fish, frozen- 15-20 minutes per pound Frozen meats/poultry/ fish – except ground meats – will not lose any juices in the soak, and they can remain in the soak until thawed. After the soak, place food in a fresh water rinse for 5-10 minutes. The fresh water introduces new oxygen into the food. Let the food drain well before refrigerating. Caution: Do not use more bleach than recommended and do not soak longer than times given. Background In the 1950s at Sierra States University in California, Hazel Parcells, ND,conducted an experiment with shriveled, discolored lemons meant for the compost pile. She placed them into a sink full of water into which she put a small amount of bleach. Within one-half hour the lemons had taken on a fresh appearance and the room smelled of fragrant lemon. Parcells portioned them out and placed them in a freezer. For the next three years they were tested for freshness and nutritional value in every class she taught. Through the third year they retained their freshness, moisture, tartness and rivaled fresh lemons, even in nutritional value. The sodium hypochlorite – the chlorine part of "chlorine" bleach – is an oxygenator and interacts with the natural chemicals in the lemons originally used by Dr. Parcells. Testing showed that the bleach actually cleaned the lemons, eliminating fungi, bacteria and other foreign material on them that might have contributed to earlier than normal deterioration. Parcells found that Clorox bleach worked the best of all bleaches because of the manufacturer' s high quality procedures and filtration. She spent the next few years experimenting and refining her methods with different foods. She used the bleach soak for forty years, with nary a complaint, and lived to be 104 years old, passing in 1996. The Parcells Oxygen Soak is registered with the Smithsonian Institution under "Simplified Kitchen Chemistry," and is used around the world with great success, having been adopted by health departments of many governments. You can learn more about the late Hazel Parcells by visiting her center's website: http://www.Parcells Center.com.
3 people like this
12 responses
@avonrep1 (1862)
• United States
16 Mar 07
I got to research this more. Thanks for the info. Willow I was shocked to see bleach though to be honest and that scares me, so I am off to research this topic some more.
1 person likes this
@avonrep1 (1862)
• United States
16 Mar 07
Willow thanks for this post, my research showed if follow percisely the bleach is safe and gets rinsed out. Whew. But maybe this will help my daughter's condition. I will be trying it. Thanks
1 person likes this
@Willowlady (10665)
• United States
17 Mar 07
Thanks for taking the time to seek your own information that pertained to you. I am impresses. Bleach breaks down into water I have heard so with proper use and rinsing I am confident that this would improve our lives. Thanks for responding.
@bluewings (3857)
15 Mar 07
The process of oxygenation is very interesting read indeed.What I find interesting is that it claims to take care of bioterrorisn as well.With innovations in science newer methods of mass destructions keep coming up.I woule be interested to learn from the website how the chlorine bleach could take away all the foreign body if the foreign body used happens to be an intrinsic part of a hybrid crop.
1 person likes this
@Willowlady (10665)
• United States
17 Mar 07
Hope you can visit that site, that link looks broken the way it is typed. I hope you find what you are lookging for. Thanks for responding.
1 person likes this
@msqtech (15075)
• United States
29 Mar 07
I think anything that improves safety is great
@jennybianca (12912)
• Australia
16 Mar 07
E-Coli is a serious bacteria. We had an outbreak in Adelaide this summer, and for a while, scientists ouldn't find the source. It turned out to be two situations: 1. Unwashed fruits & vegeatables, or not properly washed. 2. Swimming pools. Pools put up signs banning people who had diarhea. Thank you for bringing up this important health issue.
• United States
16 Mar 07
I don't think ecoli was exactly the subject of this discussion. Did you read it?
@Willowlady (10665)
• United States
17 Mar 07
E coli is indeed bacteria and that is mentioned in the article and yes we did read this posts. Thanks for contributing Jenny and you too Angel!
@villageanne (8554)
• United States
20 Mar 07
this is wonderful information and we should all do this with all our store bought foods. They are just not safe anymore. Unless you raise them yourself, you cannot be sure they are safe to eat.
@Willowlady (10665)
• United States
21 Mar 07
I agree and we do raise what we can. Buyer beware is still applicable. Thanks for responding.
@AskAlly (3626)
• Canada
17 Mar 07
I would like to do some more research on this. Thank you for the link. This sounds very interesting. I plant organically but use companion planting to avoid, insects and disease. I have never used this method to wash veggies. Will be interesting to experiment with. I am not crazy about bleach, so will do more research before I try this.
@Willowlady (10665)
• United States
17 Mar 07
You are most welcome. I strive to be of service. Bleach at the rate of 1 tsp to a gallon of water is quite good for me. Bleach breaks down into water anyway after a time I hear. Thanks much for responding.
• United States
16 Mar 07
Thank you very much for this valuable information. I wash my fruits and vegatable very well before consuming them. It's a very important thing to do. I also wash my lettuce in a water and vinegar solution. Lloyd
@Willowlady (10665)
• United States
17 Mar 07
Am too a fan of vinegar. Am glad yo ufound this valuable. Thanks much for responding.
• United States
16 Mar 07
I was not aware of the Parcells Soak, but when I was younger and worked in an upscale restaurant, we used a product such as a vegetable soak, its primary ingredient was chlorine bleach and citric acids. Our head chef would have had our butts in a sling if even a single lettuce leaf left his kitchen that was not soaked and spun. I have never thought about it again. Interesting post. I wonder if there is a commercial product on the market, that is mass distributed?
@Willowlady (10665)
• United States
17 Mar 07
With the recipe there you could make your own and more inexpensively. Thanks for contributing to this discussion.
@1grnthmb (2063)
• United States
29 Mar 07
I worked as research technition for a produce company in 1982 that was developing the salad packaging that we all take for granted today. Prepagaged produced was just starting to develope and they were having problems with the lettuce rotting right after being packaged. We tried all kinds of different products to combat this and one product that was highly used at that time was a very dangerous product that has since been removed form the market. Out of all the products and combination of things we used the chlorox and citric acid gave the best results and it is still being used today by most of the produce companies that prepackage the vegetables.
• United States
29 Mar 07
Wow, that is alot of great information. Thank you for taking the time to share it with us. I knew alot, but not all of it. +++ rating as always.
@msqtech (15075)
• United States
29 Mar 07
I think this is very interesting and great to know. Thanks for the information. As always your friend.
@sarah22 (3980)
• United States
22 Mar 07
yes, but i think one cannot be too sure of it not happening to them. im clean but other place might ot be.
@AskAlly (3626)
• Canada
18 Mar 07
Okay I have come to the conclusion that anything that comes with a "Caution" like this veggie soak is not for me. I will stick with my lemon oil and water to clean my veggies. Lemon oil oxygenates as well.