Do you know any dyslexic people?

@maximax8 (30066)
United Kingdom
April 16, 2007 4:55am CST
My 11 year old son is dyslexic. He is clever and has a wonderful memory. He speaks very fluently. But he is dyslexic and this effects his reading/writing. He finds both these activities very difficult. He likes non-fiction books with plenty of illustrations or photos in, especially if they are about history. But he hates reading fiction. Do you know any dyslexic people.
4 people like this
5 responses
@teison2 (5924)
• Norway
16 Apr 07
I know several dyslectic people - none of them like to read fiction much. I think that in addition to it beeing hard to read many are discouraged by the chool and their teachers.I remember a teacher that would always make my dyslectic friend read poems with a lot of rythem and rime in them. It was so hard for her to do, and he would always grin when she messed up. needless to say she is no big fan of poetry
@Pigglies (9336)
• United States
25 Apr 07
I think the thing is, if reading is difficult, there is no need to waste time with fiction. If I'm going to spend 20 minutes reading one page, I want to actually learn something, not just read some mindless drivel. However, I will listen to fiction on audio for fun just like I watch TV for fun. But read fiction? Yeah right. If I'm spending time reading, I am reading something educational.
• United States
16 Apr 07
My husband and his brother have dyslexia, and most recently my 7 year old son was diagnosed with it also. It also affects his reading and writing, and I'm so glad we caught it this year at school. He was struggling this year, and his teacher pushed for testing on him. Although we are getting a late start for this school year, I felt a weight lifted from my shoulders when we talked to the teachers at the school. I'm wondering, is your son left handed also? My husband, his brother, and son are all left handed, and they told us that many people with dyslexia are left handed also! Now are son will get extra help in reading next school, they are teaching alternative ways of looking at words and sentences. My husband has commented that he wishes they would have had a program like that for him when he was in school. My son also enjoys the books with large pictures. Some of his favorite books are the Time-Life series like the Old West and Civil War.
@Pigglies (9336)
• United States
25 Apr 07
I've been told many dyslexic people are ambidextrous. I'm ambidextrous, but still awaiting testing for dyslexia (that may never happen).
@Woodpigeon (3710)
• Ireland
3 May 07
My seven year old is a suspected dyslexic and the first two years of school were a living hell for him. He has had a resource teacher throughout and is finally catching up a bit. He has almost finished reading Esio Trot all by himself, which this time last year would have been unimaginable. I don't know if they are going to diagnose him officially, or if they will phase him out of the program, but it has certainly been a real struggle for him. It's amazing what a vocabulary he has, though, and his powers of description far exceed his agemates. He is also a very talented artist, so this reading thing, in the big picture, is hardly the end of the world!
@wildpvcgal (1085)
30 Apr 07
My son who is 9 is dyslexic, He has problems with his reading and writing, he does try hard but it takes him longer to do so compared to othered. It has frustrated him in the past but he is now learning to deal with it and has many other talents and uses to make up for it. He also has a slight speech impairment, he's a bright lad and also has a very good membory. xxx
@steerforth (1802)
• Italy
16 Apr 07
No I don't know anybody in this condition. Developmental dyslexia is a condition or learning disability which causes difficulty with reading and writing. Its standard definition is a difficulty in reading and writing in spite of normal or above-average intelligence and cognitive abilities. The word "dyslexia" comes from the Greek words d??- dys- ("impaired") and ????? lexis ("word"). People are often identified as dyslexic or dyslectic when their reading or writing problems cannot be explained by a lack of intellectual ability, inadequate instruction, or sensory problems such as poor eyesight. The term dyslexia is also sometimes used to refer to the loss of reading ability following brain damage. This form of dyslexia is more often referred to as either acquired dyslexia or "alexia". Dyslexia primarily impacts reading and writing abilities; however, other difficulties have been reported including deficits in processing spoken language as well as non-language difficulties. Despite popular belief, dyslexia is not caused by reversing the order of letters in reading, nor is it a visual perception deficit that involves reading letters or words backwards or upside down. Evidence that dyslexia is a neurological or brain-based condition is substantial. Research also suggests an association with biochemical and genetic markers. Some question whether the term dyslexia is so fraught with popular misconceptions that it should be dropped altogether and replaced with the term Reading Disorder or Reading Disability (RD). Because difficulty in "breaking the code" of sound-letter association (reading acquisition) can be seen as being on a continuum, some believe the term dyslexia should be reserved for the two to five percent most severely affected with RD. Moreover, dyslexia is not always the culprit in a child's not learning to read. Poor teaching methods can leave non-dyslexic children with poor reading skills.