A Question About Istambul Turkey

Canada
May 1, 2007 5:35am CST
It's interesting how a part of Istambul is in Asia, and another part is in Europe. It's also interesting how one needs a passport to travel from one country to another, but what if a city or country expands over two continents? How do people travel between the Asian and the European parts of Turkey? Are there any special security measures? Are there any regional differences between the two sides, or is it just a geographical thing?
4 people like this
13 responses
• Singapore
1 May 07
You won't need a passport to travel from the European part of Istanbul to the Asian part and vice versa. In fact, we didn't know that the city was divided into a European part and an Asian part until the tour guide pointed out to us when we were cruising in the water that hey, that's Europe! Generally you won't feel the difference as it's mainly geographical. On both sides, you'll get the familiar Turkish cuisine and get to experience the same Turkish culture. It's a beautiful place.
• Canada
1 May 07
I wish I was there, right now!
1 person likes this
@Marie2473 (8521)
• Sweden
1 May 07
Although I have lived in turkey for about a year I never went to istanbul, but from what I know there are no difference between the two parts and there are no security or stuff like that. People live in one part and work in the other and i think they can move around freely =)
2 people like this
• Canada
1 May 07
Thanks Marie.
@miryam (6510)
• Italy
1 May 07
I not know Turky..noy interst me.I see Egipt and Tunisia..my boyfriend was go in Turky years ago to play a folleyball in olimpiadi
1 person likes this
• Canada
2 May 07
Cool!
@miryam (6510)
• Italy
2 May 07
what is cool????
1 person likes this
• Canada
4 May 07
It's an English (North American) slang expression when something is good. Good for you, good response, thanks for sharing.... basically to express a positive response to something.
1 person likes this
@vanities (11376)
• Davao, Philippines
2 May 07
If it does happen then no need for visas i guess if your a citizen of that particular country..
• Canada
4 May 07
Thanks.
@oriental (1051)
• Uruguay
2 May 07
Turkey is not the only country to present this peculiarity. Russia is also in Europe and Asia. And there are other countries people usually does not consider as being transcontinental. U.S.A. is one of them (Hawaii is in Oceania. Chile is another (Pascua or Easter Island is in Oceania, too). France has a lot of "Departements d'outremer" in continents other than Europe. Canary Islands I think are part of Africa, so also Spain would be a transcontinental country.
1 person likes this
• Canada
4 May 07
That is all true, but Istambul is the only Transcontinental city in existance. Thank you for your comment, and your geography lesson. That was greatly appreciated.
• United States
1 May 07
I really wish I knew that answer to that. It was never covered in my travel classes. Guess that's something I can ask when I go back next week.
1 person likes this
• Canada
4 May 07
How lucky you are to be going back to Turkey. I wish I was going to Turkey.
@Dolcerina (3379)
• Hungary
1 May 07
There are borders bettween only the countries, of course.
1 person likes this
• Canada
2 May 07
Thanks.
@Writerbob (572)
• United States
1 May 07
Continents are more like geographic descriptions instead of sovereign entities like countries. The boundaries of continents are primarily physical while countries borders are arbitrary. Speaking of Turkey, I lived there thirty years ago and still have fond memories. Don't get me wrong - there was much (and still is from my research) backwardness, but the people had a spirit that I admired. And the food - to die for!
1 person likes this
• Canada
2 May 07
You explained it well. Since it's not often a city spans two continents, I wasn't sure. What you said made sense, and that's what I would have guessed, but countries are smaller than continents, and this doesn't happen too often, so I thought I'd better ask. Thanks for your comment!
1 May 07
If there is not much security in Istambul does that mean people can continue into the rest of the continent without a passport? This is one of those places that changed name it used to be Constantinople - I always wonder how the people feel at the time this happens. It takes us ages in England to get round to bothering to change names - when a shop changes hands we still call it the old name for years!!! LOL
• Canada
1 May 07
I was thinking the same thing.
@yanjiaren (9050)
1 May 07
I have been to Turkey three times and there is no internal security change from traveling between the European part to the Asian part, what you will notice is the cultural changes as you more more and more into Asia, you can see the differences. Watch out for the terrible driving lol, I nearly got killed three times in one stretch lol. Otherwise Turks are very hospitable and the food is delicious, especially their salad tomatoes and if you go to the Black sea regions you have to try fried Hamsi fish, it is awesome!
• Canada
1 May 07
I am glad to hear happy things about Turkey, too. All of my Turkish friends in North America and the ones I've met on line still in Turkey and everywhere else, are wonderful people, and they know I think so.
@loudcry (1045)
• India
7 Oct 08
I don't think any special permits are required to travel between continents. Continents do not have jurisdictional powers like countries do. Even Russia is partly in Asia and pertly in Europe.
• China
14 Sep 08
I have met many turkish . Mostly they are friendly. Istanbul is amazing city, it have a two part. one part is in Asia. Antother is in Europe. I would like to go there.
@fox123 (285)
• Philippines
2 May 07
I havent gone there and not so familiar with that particular country, but assuming base on your description i have to guess on it the way i understand it, well yes maybe it is only a geographical thing, and some security measures being implemented on every airport which is necessary for security reasons..