Ok dog and cat lovers, I need your help and advice please!

@sodapop (977)
United States
July 11, 2007 10:31pm CST
Let me start off by saying we have a wonderful dog that we adopted at 6 weeks old. She is the best dog I have ever seen. She is 13 years old, and just beginning to show her age a little bit. We also have a cat we adopted at 3 months old who is now 3 years old. She is a very good cat, not sure she knows she is a cat..LOL. The dog and cat get along but they don't play together very often, probably because of the age of the dog. And we let the dog know she is number one, and the cat is fine with that. Now my daughter's best friends cat had kittens and my daughter has fallen in love with one of them. She is all white with the brightest blue eyes. My question is, will this kitten fit in with our dog and cat? I think the cat is still so young needs someone to play with, but I just don't know. Anybody have any answers for me...please???!!!!
3 people like this
10 responses
@brendalee (6086)
• United States
12 Jul 07
I've got a big mixture of cats and dogs and for the most part, they get along. There has been a few tiffs when a new cat is brought in but nothing serious. Maybe your daughter's friend would go for a trial run just to make sure the other animals don't get too upset. If she lets you do it that way, give it a few days and make sure you can be around for several hours when the kitten first gets there. Good luck.
2 people like this
@jbrowsin66 (1322)
• United States
12 Jul 07
We had the same situation. The dog will welcome the cat (or at least completely ignore it). The in-residence cat was very offended by the kitten. Would not let me even touch him if I had touched the kitten and hissed and growled something terrible. They have gotten in a few fights -once they bit each other's tails and both got infections! Now they still fight after four years but they "tolerate" each other most of the time. The problem usually arises when both cats what to use the stairs at the same time. When we hear growling, we just get up immediately and separate them. I'm not sure if this is due to the fact they are both males (both neutered). You might encounter spraying of territory or something in one or both cats.. We took in the kitten because he was a stray in the middle of winter, but personally I don't think I'd do this again. Adopting another cat is usually a 15-20 year commitment --a long time to put up with unwanted behaviors. They ARE cute though aren't they? lol Good luck.
2 people like this
@DJ9020 (1596)
• United States
12 Jul 07
Its funny how sometimes bringing a younger animal into a home can rejuvenate older ones. You may be surprised at how well they get along. Also, kittens will play with just about anything! If the olders ones don't want to play, give her a wadded up ball of paper for hours of fun!
2 people like this
@deepakg4 (897)
• India
12 Jul 07
cat - Do You Have Room for a Pet? Top

Active dogs need more space and more daily exercise than older or more sedentary dogs. Some pets may get enough exercise within the confines of a house or apartment. For their own safety, dogs and cats should not be allowed to run uncontrolled, but should be walked on a leash or exercised in an enclosed area. Most animals are better kept indoors or in a suitable kennel while you're gone. 
Cats, birds, and small mammals can adapt to any size living quarters. 


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What Activities Do You Enjoy? Top

You and your family should discuss the reasons you want a companion animal and what you expect an animal to do with and for you. Most people keep pets as companions, whereas others enjoy animals for showing, breeding, hunting, or other reasons. Will the animal you're considering have the temperament and physical attributes to participate in your outdoor activities (hiking, hunting, or camping) or in quiet pastimes at home? If your leisure activities take you away from home, who will care for your pet during your absences? Read about the temperaments and needs of species and breeds, and identify those that best match your lifestyle. 
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How Do You Spend Your Day? Top

Pets depend on people for daily affection and attention. Young puppies and kittens require time for housebreaking, training, and feeding. Are you gone all day? Do you frequently work late? What will you do with your pet during long absences? Feeding, exercise, grooming, and play are daily time commitments that must be considered in caring for a healthy, happy pet. 
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Do You Have a No-Pets Clause? Top

Most rental agreement no-pets clauses apply only to dogs and cats; birds or small mammals may be acceptable. If you want a dog or cat but your lease or condominium association rules prohibit them, ask that the no-pets clause be waived or negotiated. Outline your plan to care for your pet, to adapt to your living environment, and to meet your landlord's expectations. Assure your association leaders that you are a responsible pet owner who is aware of the importance of a well-behaved animal and a clean environment. Furnish references from previous landlords or neighbors. Agree in writing to pay a refundable deposit or a small monthly surcharge.
Do You Have Room for a Pet? Top Active dogs need more space and more daily exercise than older or more sedentary dogs. Some pets may get enough exercise within the confines of a house or apartment. For their own safety, dogs and cats should not be allowed to run uncontrolled, but should be walked on a leash or exercised in an enclosed area. Most animals are better kept indoors or in a suitable kennel while you're gone. Cats, birds, and small mammals can adapt to any size living quarters. -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- What Activities Do You Enjoy? Top You and your family should discuss the reasons you want a companion animal and what you expect an animal to do with and for you. Most people keep pets as companions, whereas others enjoy animals for showing, breeding, hunting, or other reasons. Will the animal you're considering have the temperament and physical attributes to participate in your outdoor activities (hiking, hunting, or camping) or in quiet pastimes at home? If your leisure activities take you away from home, who will care for your pet during your absences? Read about the temperaments and needs of species and breeds, and identify those that best match your lifestyle. -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- How Do You Spend Your Day? Top Pets depend on people for daily affection and attention. Young puppies and kittens require time for housebreaking, training, and feeding. Are you gone all day? Do you frequently work late? What will you do with your pet during long absences? Feeding, exercise, grooming, and play are daily time commitments that must be considered in caring for a healthy, happy pet. -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Do You Have a No-Pets Clause? Top Most rental agreement no-pets clauses apply only to dogs and cats; birds or small mammals may be acceptable. If you want a dog or cat but your lease or condominium association rules prohibit them, ask that the no-pets clause be waived or negotiated. Outline your plan to care for your pet, to adapt to your living environment, and to meet your landlord's expectations. Assure your association leaders that you are a responsible pet owner who is aware of the importance of a well-behaved animal and a clean environment. Furnish references from previous landlords or neighbors. Agree in writing to pay a refundable deposit or a small monthly surcharge.
1 person likes this
@sodapop (977)
• United States
30 Jul 07
We live on 4 city plots, with a hugh fenced in back yard. We have no close neigbors, and no back door neighbors at all...just fields. We keep animals for companions, but they are really members of our family. Somebody is home all the time...I work out of the house, and if I'm not home, my hubby or children are at home. They are not young, 21 and 16. Both of them are animal loves, and I tease them that they play and give our pets more attention than they give me. We have no leisure activities that take us away from home, and if by chance we do...my mom comes out and house sits for us. The pets love her as much as us. We don't rent, we own our house, in fact, we just paid it off last year so the bank doesn't even own part of our house. I only work part-time, and make my own hours and pick the days I work. It sounds like you work for a no kill shelter that I always find a pain to fill out all the paperwork to adopt a pet from, so we always go to the county animal pound. I think you are making it harder to take in a pet than a child. I was a foster parent, (not anymore, only when my kids were younger) and I don't think they asked as many questions as you do. And just in case you were wondeing, all my 2 pets are "fixed" up on their shots, not over-weight, and spoiled rotten. Our vet knows our name by face.
• United States
31 Jul 07
Sodapop, You sound like a very loving family. I think the new kitten will be ok in your home. Start with gradually introducing her to the dog and/or cat you are worried about the kitten getting along with. Most time a new kitten will be ok but the dog may not realize how delicate a kitten can be. I wish I had your living arrangement and could take in more animals. They are so loving and give back twice as much as we give them. Good luck. Bless you for loving animals.
@Katlady2 (9925)
• United States
15 Jul 07
Considering that your dog already gets along with your kitty, she shouldn't have any problem with the kitten. And your kitty is still young enough that having a kitten around to play with should be a lot of fun for her. It will probably take them a while to get used to each other, with a bit of hissing and spitting involved at times. But I think that once they get used to each other, you will have to have eyes in the back of your head to watch for the stampede of critters barreling through the house. LOL
@sodapop (977)
• United States
16 Jul 07
It is amazing how one cat who is not fat can shake a bed when she jumps on it...do I really want to add another one? Hmmm...I know this Katlady that need another kitty to have a baker's dozen...would she notice one more?
1 person likes this
@Katlady2 (9925)
• United States
16 Jul 07
LOL! It's that flying leap she takes to make that lovely thumping landing. Hey...I'll make you a deal...if you promise not to sneak kitty into my house, I'll remove my cameras from your house. Deal?
• Philippines
30 Jul 07
From my experience, dogs or cats that has lived with you for quite a time never wanted to have a new "pet" around the house . Surely there will be a provervial"dog-and-cat-fight" all the time. But I believe too that in due time, they could be friends, after all.
20 Jul 07
it should be ok i have two two year old cats two one year old cats and an eight month old dog they all get on fine with each other.
@mestr12 (227)
• Philippines
20 Jul 07
Oh, yes! The kitten will definitely fit in. I'm sure that your two older pets have the capacity to love and accept a helpless kitten. As long as your dog accepts the kitten, your cat will follow. You might be surprised by the reaction of your pets when they will see your kitten. Good luck!
• United States
12 Jul 07
The dog will probably be fine with the new cat. It's the other cat who might have a problem. A trial period is a good idea. If you can arrange with the other person to accept the kitten back if it looks like your cat will hate it, then it should be okay to bring it home for a bit. Try to keep them physically separate for a while, but able to see each other and smell each other. See how that works out.
@cikedo (3487)
• United States
12 Jul 07
How did your dog react when you brought your first cat home? My guess is that the dog will react the same as she did with your 3 year old cat. If anything the kitten might help your older dog feel a bit younger and they may play together.