A question about multiple life sentences.

United States
January 4, 2009 2:36pm CST
I mean how can anyone serve more than one life sentence. Do they count resurrection as a second life? If it is not counted as a second life then what is the point of multiple life sentence? Its not like anyone could respawn? and if they could respawn would that be counted as second life? If a prisoner dies and is reincarnated into another human will he/she be put back in prison to serve the other life sentence? If so wouldn't that be unfair. Wouldn't it be like punishing someone for the crimes their relatives or friends did?
2 people like this
9 responses
@myklj999 (20752)
4 Jan 09
One of the reasons is that if one sentence is overturned on a legal technicality, the person will remain in prison due to the other sentences.
3 people like this
• United States
4 Jan 09
The purpose of multiple life sentences is to make sure that the person spends the majority of, if not the full remainder of their life in prison. Many times multiple life sentences also carry no chance of parole, or parole after the second term. "Life" in prison is not really life, but a specified number of years.
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@paoxav (1382)
• Philippines
5 Jan 09
well said.. i agree on this one..
1 person likes this
@jlamela (4909)
• Philippines
5 Jan 09
In the Philippines, multiple life sentence also existed in the law. I am also confused and could not comprehend exactly how the law managed to formulate this illogical punishment. I mean how on earth a person can serve all these punishments if let's say he is 50 years old when he committed the crime and got a sentence with atleast 100 years. It did not make any sense anyway. I think the justice department must explain their laws carefully so that people will not be confused.
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@srijshm (1165)
• India
5 Jan 09
Multiple life sentences are useful when the prisoner completes 14 years & applies for pardon. If the prisoner has two life sentences then he/she needs to complete 28 / 42 years of prison before applying for an early discharge. Wha else can a judge do when the law does not permit capitol punishment??
1 person likes this
• United States
5 Jan 09
I think it simply means that is a better chance of the person staying in prison for the rest of his life. And as one of the other responses commented those kind of sentences also say there is no possibility of parol.
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@pergammano (7755)
• Canada
5 Jan 09
In Canada, multiple life sentences simply means that one will never be paroled! A single life sentence is 25 years, and therefore parole is entertained after 2/3 of the sentence is served...that is 16 years! But if parole should be granted on the first sentence, the second one would come into play, and so forth!
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@Sheldon25 (193)
• Jamaica
5 Jan 09
Hello, my take on this question in my country a person who gets life sentence normally 25 years or more is considered life so a person can get more than one life sentence. To me if a Judge gives a person 3 twenty five years to life and sentence should be done consecutive. That's just simple telling me the person will not have the opportunity to apply for parole. That's just my views THANKS.
• United States
5 Jan 09
If a life sentence is not forever then why have a life sentence at all. They could just sentence the guy to 25 years in prison instead of life.
• Jamaica
5 Jan 09
I think they simple mean that from its 25 years it is a life sentence.
@uath13 (8207)
• United States
5 Jan 09
Well there's always the point that if they were able to get one overturned they'd still be spending life in jail for the other ones. To get out they'd have to get all of them overturned which would be far more difficult. Also if they asign an actual # of years then they get added up to ensure the prisoner doesn't outlive it.
• India
5 Jan 09
In a way what you say is correct. But I think multiple sentences apply in cases where the same person has committed several crimes at different places and times and all the cases are being tried simultaneously. So if all the verdicts come out at more or less the same time, then of course the person gets convicted many times over. It also means that the person has the least chance of ever getting out …even if he gets parole in one case, he has to serve for all the others.