Would it make a difference...

@cyberfluf (5005)
Netherlands
March 1, 2009 5:16pm CST
... if your dog bites your child or a child you don't know on the street? In theory it's by the exact same occaission, with the exact same intention, etc. I personally think it shouldn't make a difference. If a dog bites someone and isn't able to rehabiliate it shouldn't be around people anymore without having a muzzle. I do know people who think this is an unneccesairy precaution; adults and/or children shouldn't come around their dogs without asking. Sounds fair, you shouldn't pet a dog without asking and teach your kids the same, but I would like to be able to walk by them without losing a finger or two. What are your toughts on vicious dogs? Where does the responsibility of the owner end and your own resposibility begin?
1 person likes this
6 responses
@genterx (110)
• Mexico
2 Mar 09
Hmm well first I would say that if you want to pet a dog you should ask the owner if you can then you know it will not bite you and is friendly. and second the owner should say when the dog is dangerous and when he is not. and take precautions when you see a un collared dog
1 person likes this
@cyberfluf (5005)
• Netherlands
3 Mar 09
You have said a very wise thing; both the owner and the other person have reasponsibilities. We should never approach a dog we don't know without asking first, and the owner is responsible to warn other people if the dog is not fond of attention by strang people (and in the worst case scenario provide a muzzle). Thank you for responding.
• United States
2 Mar 09
A dog with a problem with biting needs to be taught to curb that no matter what. I know with me, personally, if it's my own dog, I am more likely to forgive it for biting me if it had a good reason. But, I would be horrified if I had a dog that bit people outside the home. There are actual legal liabilities regarding dog bites.
1 person likes this
@cyberfluf (5005)
• Netherlands
3 Mar 09
If a dog has a reason to bite, for example it is being hurt or something like that, I agree it would be more likely to forgive it. It is indeed another topic and harder if the person is not from your family but someone outside the home. It's too bad that if someone outside hurts or teases a dog, lots of the time the dog ends up being blamed for defending themselves.
@James72 (26829)
• Australia
2 Mar 09
Biting is biting! There's a big difference between a cause and effect bite and a behavioural biting issue as well. For example, I've seen situations where a child has pulled a dogs ears too hard and the dog has lashed out in defense. This is unfortunate of course, but is also understandable as it's not necessarily a constant act on the dog's part and is more of a knee-jerk reaction to a negative event. Dogs that are constantly lashing out at people thugh are an entirely different thing altogether! It's an owners responsibility to ensure their pet is of no concern to others and if they have an animal that is aggressive in this sense, then they need to either muzzle it or keep it away from people. As for ourown responsibilities, well it's of course plain common sense to approach ANY animal carefully thst we are not familiar with! I was always taught to approach a dog for the first time by extending the back of my hand so it could sniff it first. You can then guage the dog's physical reactions from that point and go from there. And when it comes to our children, it's vital that we teach them NOT to rush up to an animal. A child is is very exuberant for one and this could be seen as threatening by a dog. Secondly, a small child's face is of a similar height to a medium sized dog's at times, so this is a commonly bitten area as well. It's every parent's responsibility to ensure their children are very, very cautious and calm around animals they are not familiar with. Especially when it comes to dogs!
1 person likes this
@cyberfluf (5005)
• Netherlands
3 Mar 09
What can I add, James? I totally agree with you on this one. We should teach our children to be carefull with animals, especially animals they don't know. I am also in favour of never letting a child run up to an animal or start petting an animal before asking the owner first. There is indeed a difference between biting out of defence and pain other than going around biting for no reason. There is basicly nothing more for me to add here, lovely response. Keep them coming
• Sweden
2 Mar 09
In Sweden, where I live, I´m , as owner of the dog, is responsible for everyyhing that the dog does. For instans, if somebody, gets into my garden, and my dog bites them there, to protect me, I´m responsible for the injure on the person who entered my garden.... That´s Swedish law, and it´s sucks, I think. But ofcourse , if my dogs are out my property, I think it´s right, mean dog shouldn´t be allowed there, without proper safty thinking.
1 person likes this
@cyberfluf (5005)
• Netherlands
3 Mar 09
I think if a dog bites a person to defend you it's a whole other story aswell. People shouldn't just approach a dog without asking if that is ok first. Here in Holland we are responsible aswell, even when the other person has taken stupid actions to tick of the dog. It's a bit of a crooked law..
• United States
2 Mar 09
To be completely honest, and this is one of my strong opinions, if my dog were to intentionally bite anyone for no reason at all, I would have it euthanized. I would never take any risks with it, because it'll be so likely(not all the time) it'll do it again.
1 person likes this
@cyberfluf (5005)
• Netherlands
2 Mar 09
I respect that choice, the dog is indeed a dangerous subject. Unfortunatly in Holland it's not allways possible to have a dog euthanized because it bit someone (on the other hand, a good thing because you can't just go around having dogs put down for some reason). They first get a peronality test and if the dog is vicious it is put down straight away. If it bites because it is scared or something like that, they will recommend taking a class with it and putting on a muzzle for the time being. If the dog feels save in your home and doesn't bite anyone there, a muzzle is also suggested. I do share the feeling that I wouldn't feel save around that dog anymore.
• United States
1 Mar 09
it would not matter to me weither my dog bit my kids or someone elses dog. it still bit a kids and i would get rid of it. i would not be able to live with myself if my dog bit someone. it wouldn't matter who it was. i would have to get rid of the dog.
1 person likes this
@cyberfluf (5005)
• Netherlands
2 Mar 09
I agree that it doesn't change anything about the fact that the dog has bitten someone, and therefor needs some serious rehabilitation and shouldn't be in a family with kids anymore. I share that opinion, and I am curious to see if there are people who can convince me of the other side. I wonder if there are (m)any people that believe otherwise... let's waitte and see.