Puerto Rico Quarter?

United States
May 11, 2009 4:00pm CST
Ok I saw a couple when I was at work wondering why on Earth does Puerto Rico get a Quarter? They are not one of the 50 states but a territory of the US. They are doing one for all the territories according to the US Mint web site http://www.usmint.gov/mint_programs/DCAndTerritories/ Do you think they should mint coins for countries that are technically not part of the USA?
3 responses
@khayshenz (1387)
• United States
12 May 09
Actually, Puerto Rico is a U.S Territory. Since they're US Territory - they are OWNED by US. No, they're not U.S. Citizens! Why? They can't vote! Other than that fact, they pretty much operate under the same constitution. How do I know this? I have friends in Saipan, the Virgin Islands, and other U.S. territories. How did I meet these people? I was once part of an organization called Upward Bound. If you want to know what that is, let me know. I'll elaborate.
• United States
6 Jun 09
In 1917, the Jones-Shafroth Act granted all Puerto-Ricans U.S. citizenship.
• United States
6 Jun 09
The fact that they can't vote is irrelevant for citizenship. Many convicted felons (though still citizens) can't vote, and inhabitants of Washington D.C. don't get voting representation in Congress.
@khayshenz (1387)
• United States
6 Jun 09
OK - I stand corrected. They are technically U.S. Citizens (as signed by Pres. Wilson), however - they are still a U.S. territory. They can locally vote - but they cannot vote in the federal level. (About voting - democracy gives me a voice and voting is the most important part of democracy. If I can vote I will -it's a "power" -- so to speak, though not much and the state of CA is about to prove to me that my vote is useless!. Felons can't vote because they lost that right (though I don't know if this true). Represented or otherwise, I will keep on voting even if I'm a minority. Because I know someday, my voice will be heard. (I have a black president after all - who would've THUNK that! 10 years ago - no one would even speak of such a thing!) Puerto Rico's history is actually quite interesting. You all should read on it. And their complicated relationship with the U.S - it's ...confusing, for the lack of a better word. Albeit interesting! Cheers!
• United States
11 May 09
Actually, Puerto Rico is technically and fully a part of the U.S. Just because it's not a state, doesn't mean anything: neither is Washington D.C. Puerto Rico uses U.S. currency, they use U.S. postal stamps, and they have U.S. passports. They are perfectly eligible for statehood, but don't consider that particular political arrangement necessary. Puerto Ricans are full U.S. citizens, and have been since 1917. Why wouldn't you want them to have a quarter? Most of the U.S. is in one of the 50 states, but not all of it. When you say these are "countries" that are "not technically part of the U.S.", you are mistaken, forgive me for saying. There is no such country as Puerto Rico. There is nothing in the Constitution that only grants full citizenship and identity rights to those who happen to live in a population constituted as a State. Nebraskans and North Dakotans were fully protected American citizens, even before those territories applied for and received statehood status.
• United States
11 May 09
I collect coins and i heard a rumor that puerto rico got a quater made for them but, didn't know if it was true. Guess i have two quaters to find. The P and D versions. oh man.