People not cleaning up after themselves...

United States
September 21, 2009 11:48am CST
Have you ever work in an area where maybe there is a kitchen for lunches or something like that and your co-workers leave a mess all the time? I had a situation at my home. Now I don't have the cleanest house on the block, but Niecy Nash ain't knocking at my door either. However, my 16 year old daughter had a friend over this weekend and they were going to hang out. So the girls showered, changed their outfits, fixed their faces. You know girly stuff. When they left, the bathroom was a mess. But not only that, the girl must have shaved her legs, and left hair everywhere. YUCK! I told my daughter about it, and she clean it up surprisingly with out much of a fuss. Shocker! Anyway, do you think I should tell her friend that I'm not her maid when she come over next time?
4 responses
@clarkbody (141)
• United States
21 Sep 09
Before I comment, I want you to know that I am a man who grew up in a house with four brothers and six sisters. My wife and I have raised three daughters. Currently they are 22, 18 and 15. I teach what i learned from my mother: clean up behind yourself. If you don't want to clean it up, don't mess it up. When you have friends over, you are responsible for them in our house. They must abide by the same rules as we do. if you don't want me inforcing house rules on your guess, then it's up to you do do so or they can't visit. Those were my mom's house rules, they have been mine and they work.
• United States
21 Sep 09
I like those rules.
@hotsummer (10358)
• Philippines
22 Sep 09
i think you should tell your daughter's friends. if you think you can't let your daughter do it. i am sure your daughter's friends will understand what they will need to do. there is nothing wrong being responsible enough to clean their own mess. and also, you are not stopping them to hang in your place and so they have not reason to feel bad at all.
• Philippines
22 Sep 09
yes, u should tell her in a nice way. tell her that they leave the room clean or as tidy and clean as they arrived. maybe, u can start putting up a signage in the bathroom, to remind them how important it is to be tidy and orderly all the time. u can do both, too, just to make sure.
@joye68 (151)
• United States
22 Sep 09
This is her friends very first visit correct? Your daughter set a positive example it sounds like in front of this person. I think it is possible to be passive (up to a point) and teach this child etiquette through the apparently grand behavior of your daughter. It may be possible (if you're patient enough) to occasionally state things in front of your daughter and her friend. "Thank you soooo much honey for cleaning the bathroom up. You KNOW how I can't stand hair in the sink (or in the shower)." without having the friend feel uncomfortable. Stuff like that. Perhaps it would be possible to get some sort of "organizer" makeup and "girly girl stuff" -wise to help them be better at keeping things straight. It was very good of your child to have set such a positive example. She must really think this friend of hers is a worthwhile friend, especially if she's attempting to appease you. :) I'm equally glad to see that you went to her instead of her friend. That would really have been something of an awkward friendship. Especially if she didn't feel that she was welcome. As she becomes more accustomed to the way you get things done, you'll be better able to make her feel like the friend is a "daughter" also... by making her clean up her own messes. "Jordan, please don't forget to get your stuff straight in the bathroom, dear...Hope ya'll have fun at the dance!" ... etc I only say this because this is how I was treated. I got to be someone else's "daughter" and I learned how to better apply this to my own child. YES, those teenage years sure are something aren't they? I just loooove Niecy Nash, don't you!