Which is more grammatical?

@psmohan (1883)
India
November 20, 2006 5:29am CST
American English or British English........
1 person likes this
14 responses
@ssgucluck (107)
• India
29 Nov 06
obviously british english!!
@psmohan (1883)
• India
30 Nov 06
Right. Thanks
1 person likes this
@psmohan (1883)
• India
30 Nov 06
Right. Thanks
1 person likes this
@psmohan (1883)
• India
30 Nov 06
Right. Thanks
1 person likes this
@mariamcj (576)
• India
26 Nov 06
british english is more grammatical...
@psmohan (1883)
• India
29 Nov 06
Thanks
1 person likes this
@psmohan (1883)
• India
29 Nov 06
Thanks
1 person likes this
@fabrietto (487)
• Italy
29 Nov 06
I think that British English is more grammatical. Without doubts.
1 person likes this
@psmohan (1883)
• India
30 Nov 06
Right. Thanks
1 person likes this
@elixir (1456)
• Guam
26 Nov 06
British I Think
1 person likes this
@psmohan (1883)
• India
29 Nov 06
Thanks
1 person likes this
@catpoo (374)
• Malaysia
26 Nov 06
british.
1 person likes this
@psmohan (1883)
• India
29 Nov 06
Thanks
1 person likes this
@Xrated (3766)
• Pakistan
24 Nov 06
british english
1 person likes this
@psmohan (1883)
• India
27 Nov 06
Thanks to all who have answered as British English
1 person likes this
@heartonfire (4132)
• Denmark
20 Nov 06
i don't know which is more gramatical..i guess that would be british..but i am used to the american english,as that is the one i hear everywhere..on tv,in movies..if i speak to a foreigner in english i use the american..the birtish one has a funny accent that i don't like to use..
@psmohan (1883)
• India
27 Nov 06
Thanks
1 person likes this
20 Nov 06
being british i am bound to say british english
1 person likes this
@psmohan (1883)
• India
20 Nov 06
Ofcourse I also feel the same. Indians also follow the same.
1 person likes this
@twopence (311)
• France
20 Nov 06
British english, no doubt!
@psmohan (1883)
• India
20 Nov 06
Yes I also thought so. Thanks
1 person likes this
• India
7 Dec 06
well i think Differences between the two include pronunciation, grammar, lexis, spelling, punctuation, idioms, formatting of dates and numbers, and so on, with some words having completely different meanings between the two dialects or even being unknown or not used in one of the dialects. For example, British "the team are worried"; American "the team is worried". Americans may use the plural form when the individual membership is clear, for example, "the team take their seats" (not "the team takes its seat(s)"), although it is almost always rephrased to avoid the singular/plural decision, as in "the team members take their seats". The difference occurs for all collective nouns, both general terms such as team and company and proper nouns (for example, where a place name is used to refer to a sports team). that is all from ma side
1 person likes this
@dattatray (894)
• India
30 Nov 06
According to me British English is more grammatical..
1 person likes this
@zgb_0001 (1384)
• Pakistan
30 Nov 06
I think British English is more grammatical.
1 person likes this
@marsha001 (675)
• India
30 Nov 06
I think British English is more grammatical.
1 person likes this
@marsha001 (675)
• India
30 Nov 06
I think British English is more grammatical.
1 person likes this