Pruning back rose bushes and other bushes

@coffeebreak (17820)
United States
December 23, 2011 7:00pm CST
Having my first home...lot of gardening is new to me. Ihave some roses..don't know what kind. I have some bushes...green ones, don't know what kind. I am in the high desert and it gets COLD up here and sometimes even snow. I can see the roses and bushes have gone dormant for the winter. I have researched and find that after the first frost is the time to prune the roses back. Question: how far do I prune them back? And not knowing what kind of bushes...do I prune them back also? THe are big and ugly, so I want to prune them and give them some shape for growing out. They are rather old and not been trimmed for years. And general instructions for doing this? APpreciate any tips and tricks of the trade for gardening! Thanks
2 responses
@savak03 (6681)
• United States
24 Dec 11
I have a couple of rose bushes that I inherited with this apartment. One is a long stemmed rose and the other is a climbing rose. The yard man came through one day late in the summer and cut my climbing rose way back. I was really mad. Fortunately he didn't kill it. Now that it is winter I need to trim it up and get it shaped so I can control it's growth next spring. I seem to remember that you cut it back to the bulge that is on the stem, but I am not sure. I think I will read the rest of your responses before I get started to make sure.
2 people like this
@coffeebreak (17820)
• United States
24 Dec 11
I have a long stem and climbing too. THe long stem is the one I refer to in the discussion above. I want to make sure I do the best I can to keep that one. I am not much a rose fan...they don't last (in a vase) to long and the petals fall so quickly, but since I have it, I'll take care of it and enjoy while they last! But the climbing...not to concerned with that in a way. There are two by the block wall on the property line. THe little roses on it aren't that pretty, but the color will be nice. Let me know if you find anything else out about them. I did cut them back a few weeks ago as they were just all over the place and looked junky. Do you some how attach them to the wall to make them climb? I mean, I know that is their "point" of a climbing bush, but I have no idea how to attached to cement blocks! But Maybe a trellis behind them might work. I hope I get some good responses. I want to learn now that I have the ability to have plants!
1 person likes this
@coffeebreak (17820)
• United States
24 Dec 11
So you suggest no trellis? Or just plastic ones? I'd think the wide bottoms would be best as there is more strength there for holding all the climbing branches. Which did you have luck with? I would like to try to get them to grown and structure them (with a trellis) to grow wider as oppose to higher...that way I can make them look like a wall of roses against the block wall. If they were in the back yard, I wouldn't mind them being a bush like you talk about. That'd probably be really nice and my back yard is about 1/2 acre...with nothing on it past the patio. But in the front where they are...to big would look junky. That's why I thought of making them grow like a "fence" or longer instead of higher. I think it'd be a huge undertaking of which I don't care to do, to dig them up and transplant, so I'll just keep cutting them back. Hadn't htought about the smell they offer..that might be nice! I was hoping to put in some honeysuckle along the wall...but I can't move these climbers. And the wall in the back is to far away from my house so I wouldn't even be able to smell them back there! I think a breeze with that honey smell on it blowing...would be wonderful.
1 person likes this
@savak03 (6681)
• United States
25 Dec 11
The thing about training a climbing rose is to decide where you want it to climb and provide some support to attach it to. I like to build my own 'trellis' out of one by twos. I find that they are stronger that way. also rough cut lumber offers the plant more of a texture to cling to. I don't agree with cotruelove about it deteriorating the wood. Or maybe I should say that the wood is secondary to my objective. It is best to start training the shoots when the are young and tender. That way you can weave them in and out of your support system easier. Just remember they have thorns and you will get stuck, even if you wear gloves.
1 person likes this
• United States
29 Dec 11
If yo are wanting them to grow like a fence line then take some of the long stems and put them in a shallow hole with about 10 inches expoxed on the far side. Cover the stem with food soil and maybe even put a stone or other weight over it so that it stays buried. You can do this with several stems along the same line as you want the "fence" line. It may take a year or more for the stem to root but it will still have food coming from the main plant. You can keep on planting the new shouts in the "fence" line when they get long enough. I would not plant the shoots closer than about three or four feet from the "mother" plant.