Do you want to become a better thinker? It's a matter of belief!

@urbandekay (18312)
September 27, 2012 3:45pm CST
Some people hold to what we might call a 'fixed' theory, believing that their qualities, such as their intelligence, are simply fixed traits, inherited or fixed early in development Others have a malleable (or incremental) theory, believing that their most basic qualities can be developed through their efforts and education. Research shows that people with a malleable theory are more open to learning, willing to confront challenges, able to stick to difficult tasks, and capable of bouncing back from failures (Dweck, 1999). These qualities lead to better performance in the face of challenges such as difficult school transitions (Blackwell,Trzesniewski, & Dweck, 2007), demanding business tasks (e.g., negotiations; Kray, 2007), and difficulties in relationships (e.g.,dealing with conflict; Kammrath& Dweck, 2006). Surely we would all agree that these are a key part of how people function. Belief in malleability of ability can be taught Praise for achievement damages malleability but praise for effort reinforces malleability So, do you reward your child when they do something well? Or do you reward them when they try hard? all the best urban
1 person likes this
4 responses
• China
1 Oct 12
I fall in with the latter's views, namely most basic qualities can be developed through our efforts and education.In fact,there is no limit to knowledge and the more you learn,the less you feel you know.No way should one is born to knowledge.The former's views is out and out metaphysics.
@urbandekay (18312)
1 Oct 12
Hmmm, are you confusing knowledge with intelligence? all the best urban
• China
4 Oct 12
Sorry! I got it wrong.However I still fall in with the latter's views.
@stary1 (6622)
• United States
27 Sep 12
urbandekay..Interesting..I have never heard of anyone believing in a 'fixed' theory...i.e. intelligence is fixed...maybe I an not understanding the meaning. Seems to me someone who had a fixed intelligence couldn't function very well...since they could not develope intellectually
@urbandekay (18312)
27 Sep 12
Not sure that is true, having a fixed theory of intelligence would not be a bar to learning; knowledge is not intelligence all the best urban
@stary1 (6622)
• United States
13 Oct 12
I guess I misunderstood..I thought you were saying fixed intelligence meant it could not develop..
@vandana7 (66851)
• India
28 Sep 12
Effort is worth appreciation of course. Doing well ...:) I dont have kids. So I cant say how I would behave with them. But as far as my life goes..pa was indifferent to both efforts as well as achievement. If at all, he has been something of a destroyer..lol I often compare my life with that of the pilot in James Clavell's Shogun. The guy thinks he will be able to sail back home but is held back by devious means by the Shogun..lol. The only thing is dad does not do it with wisdom or shrewdness of Shogun. He does it because he simply does not understand he is doing it and with absolute lack of consideration towards my efforts..and he is very very difficult to talk to when he has made up his mind. A few years later, he realizes his mistake..but by then, I am no longer in a position to offer him the same comforts that he seeks. I no longer feel motivated to achieve anything. I feel I have accepted defeat in some way. So no more efforts.
@urbandekay (18312)
29 Sep 12
Oh dear, that is indeed bad all the best, urban
@JohnRok1 (2051)
27 Sep 12
How about a ductile theory? Anyone explain what that is?