Can I have an employers point of view when it comes to Maternity leave?

United States
October 8, 2012 4:54pm CST
I heard that maternity leave can be a problem to employers. I only heard the woman's side. I want to hear the employer's side of why many employers would let go a pregnant woman or a woman on maternity leave.
3 responses
@aejey322 (1006)
• Philippines
9 Oct 12
I am not an employer... but I do have subordinates under me who are both ladies. It should not be a problem because it is a woman's right and privilege to get pregnant, especially of course if she is married. And government allows and even gives maternity pays to those who goes on maternity leave. I live in the Philippines by the way. I gave birth last January and had my 78 days maternity leave (I was on CS delivery). I never receive any pay from the company because ML is a leave without pay. But I do get a maternity benefit from the Social Security System. Maybe the problem that you are referring to is the responsibilities that will be left by the employee on ML. Companies usually hire a temporary replacement. And this must be done before the ML effectivity to give time for the training and turnovers. So when the employee will be on leave, somebody will take over her place so as not to hinder the company operations. Companies may even be happy with having employees on ML because they have lesser salary expense since they pay cheaper to the replacement they can save for 2 months.
• United States
9 Oct 12
I head employers complain that woman on maternity leave get money for doing nothing. I was wondering if the replacement will lose their job because the mother returned. Is that fair? I just want to hear the employer's side of the story. I already heard the pregnant woman side of the story. I heard an employer say a woman can choose to remain pregnant or terminate her pregnancy. I just don't understand exactly what it seems so far. Does that mean the other employees do more work without more pay? Will someone lose their job? There is still so much I don't know yet.
@aejey322 (1006)
• Philippines
10 Oct 12
we can't really do any office work because we have just gave birth... but it is a benefit given by the government (I think it's all over the world... because all woman may possibly get pregnant because that is how we are created). Yes, the replacement will lose her job once the employee returns from the maternity leave. It is not unfair because in the first place her contract is just a reliever and not a regular or permanent position. So he/she knows that her term will end in 2-4 months depending on the arrangement. But well, I hope an employer can read your post so they can also give their comments and explain the things that you don't understand.
• United States
28 Nov 12
If you were to hire a woman who is pregnant to do a job but she left for maternity leave, would you be willing to pay her even though she is currently not making you any money? What if no one forced you to pay. Imagine that it is a bunch of employees who left for maternity leave. You would be losing money. You might reach a point where you run out of money and they sue you because they say you are discriminating against them which you know is not true.
@yahnee (1250)
• Philippines
9 Oct 12
A maternity leave cannot actually be a problem for employers. A woman once she confirms her pregnancy must notify HR or her superior of her condition. Since the company is notified beforehand that there will be a maternity leave of at least 2 months, they can train for a replacement. If a replacement is not an ideal solution, the workload of the employee can be divided among some of the co-employees until the maternity leave is over. Companies cannot discriminate a woman employee who happens to get pregnant and this should not be in any way a basis for dismissal. In my country, this is against the law since the rights of women are protected and among this rights is to be allowed to get pregnant.
• United States
8 Oct 12
In the US it is illegal to let go a woman that is pregnant or on maternity leave. It is called FMLA (Family Medical Leave Act)....employers are required to give a woman at least 6 weeks unpaid maternity leave after giving birth...unless it is in a work contract that you cannot get pregnant (such as working as an exotic dancer in an upscale club or something similar)....letting a woman go because she is pregnant is discriminatory and it is illegal in the United States to discriminate against employees. I'm not sure where you're from, but if you're here in the States, a woman cannot be let for being pregnant or taking leave due to giving birth.