Things Religious People Say That Annoy Me (Part 3)

@FourWalls (16233)
United States
October 24, 2015 11:11am CST
I guess by now this is more of a case of "things Christians say that annoy me," because generally you don't hear people of other religions saying these things. This one is exclusively Christian. This, too, is not necessarily a single statement, but contradictory activities, but it's centered around this statement. CHRIST NAILED THE LAW TO THE CROSS The problems with this are voluminous. You have Christians contradicting their Messiah, who said, "Do not think I came to destroy the Law" (Matthew 5:17). You also have selective reading there (this is usually based on Colossians 2:14, which says that "He cancelled the charges against us, nailing them to his cross." That says nothing of the Laws of God; rather, it says that the list of personal sins was nailed to the cross.). More problematic is the "cafeteria" style approach to the Law that nearly all Christians participate in. Case in point: many conservative Christians want the Ten Commandments posted, or they have bumper stickers that say, "I keep the Ten Commandments." However, when it comes to commandment number four -- "Remember the Sabbath day, to keep it holy," Christians have a cow. "Christ nailed the law to the cross!" is their cry for not obeying this commandment that they claim they're keeping (per the bumper sticker on their car). Oh, they love the part about "do no work." There are Christian-owned national chains such as Hobby Lobby and Chick-Fil-A that are all closed on Sunday. I think that's admirable that they follow their religious principles; however, the principle they're following is explicitly reserved for the seventh day of the week, NOT the first day of the week. "The seventh day is the Sabbath of the Lord your God. On that day you will do no work" (Exodus 20:10). I hear this argument (which could be a separate discussion): "it doesn't matter which day." Yes, it does. It's one of the Ten Commandments they're claiming to follow. Furthermore, before God established the Jews or the Law or anything else, He created the Sabbath: "God rested on the seventh day, and He blessed it and declared it 'holy'" (Genesis 2:3). There are several other examples, such as the "Old Testament" (I hate that term, because the implication that the word of God can be segmented by humans into an "old" testament and a "new testament" is blasphemous, not to mention that it opens the door for religious cults who will declare a "newer testament" has come along) prohibition against homosexuality. In fact, you've probably seen this, where people respond to the "proof text" with other laws in the same book (Leviticus) that Christians completely disregard. Here's the final reason it annoys me: according to Judaism, there are a whopping 613 commandments/rules/laws in the Torah (law). Christianity claims that is "too much" and declares it "nailed to the cross," replacing it with man-made catechisms that are infinitely more cumbersome. The most recent Catechism of the Catholic Church has (wait for it) TWO THOUSAND, EIGHT HUNDRED AND TWO rules and regulations. But the Law of God is "cumbersome"? Someone posted a response to my last discussion in this series, saying they thought it was a case of man ignoring what God says because they don't like that rule, so they either ignore it or replace it with their own. That's exactly what "Christ nailed the law to the cross" is all about: man doesn't like the notion of obeying 613 simple rules that God gave, so they throw them away in favor of hundreds, if not thousands, of man-made religious rules. Or, as Jesus put it, "You hypocrites! You ignore the commands of God by substituting the traditions of man!" (Mark 7:8) You can't have it both ways.
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2 responses
@OneOfMany (12392)
• United States
25 Oct 15
Of course, you always have Constantine paying people to form a council, voting on what texts are God's word, and putting it into form in the 4th century, thus creating the New Testament. Of course you have all the prophecies in it coming true because it was assembled after the events had happened. It would be like 9/11 being prophesied in the Newest Testament, and people oohing and aahing about it being spot on. Of course, the Newest Testament doesn't exist right now, but in a few hundred years those people won't know any better.
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@FourWalls (16233)
• United States
25 Oct 15
I don't agree with this, for two reasons. First, although the "new testament" may have been canonized in the 4th century, most of it was written before 90 CE. Secondly, the prophecies of the Tanakh (or "old testament," the one Christians claim has been done away with despite their own admission that at least 100 prophecies have yet to be fulfilled regarding the return of Jesus) cannot be considered to be "written after the fact," given that most scholars concur that the last book of the Tanakh was written absolutely no later than 300 BCE (with most conservative scholars putting it even earlier than that, per the Maccabean reference to a canon or collection of books in 400 BCE). In contrast, look at the list of prophecies that Joseph Smith, the founder of the Mormon church made, and he was pretty much 0-for-60 in his prophecies. Mario Mendoza had a better batting average than that!
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@OneOfMany (12392)
• United States
26 Oct 15
@FourWalls Things were written, sure, but they all agreed on what stayed and what didn't. Anyhow, I have prophesied things and they have come true, and you don't have to be a man of god to do that. You just have to be able to see a little farther into the distance.
@dlr297 (5418)
• United States
26 Oct 15
You need to put the whole verse up...Think not that I am come to destroy the law, or the prophets: I am not come to destroy, but to fulfill.. What does it mean.... "Christ is the end of the law so that there may be righteousness for everyone who believes," will help in understanding what is means that Christians are not under the law. "Know that a man is not justified by observing the law, but by faith in Jesus Christ. So we, too, have put our faith in Christ Jesus that we may be justified by faith in Christ and not by observing the law, because by observing the law no one will be justified" This passage reveals that the Law cannot justify or make righteous any man in God’s sight, which is why God sent His Son to completely fulfill the requirements of the Law for all those who would ever believe in Him. He substituted Himself in our place and upon the cross took the punishment that is justly ours so that we are no longer under the curse of the Law. In doing so, He fulfilled and upheld the requirements of the Law. This does not mean that Christians are to be lawless, as some advocate today—a teaching called antinomianism. Rather, it means that we are free from the Mosaic Law and instead under the law of Christ, which is to love God with all of our being and to love our neighbors as we love ourselves. The purpose of the Old Testament law is to convict people of our inability to keep the law and point us to our need for Jesus Christ as Savior (Romans 7:7-9; Galatians 3:24)..
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