Shirt Puzzle

@pgiblett (6595)
Canada
January 5, 2016 10:44am CST
I was ironing some shirts this morning, as is my habit. In doing so I ironed two shirts, both bought the same day from the same store, one yellow striped, the other green striped, same maker, same style, just different colours. Both shirts profess to be easy-iron shirts . Whenever I iron the green shirt there are creases everywhere, particularly where the buttons are, it also wrinkles across the button holes and the collar is a mess . The other shirt (yellow) I quickly iron taking out a couple of minor wrinkles and hang it up on the rack. I have always been curious why two seemingly identical shirts act so differently when washed. Life, as they say, is a curious thing.
16 people like this
16 responses
@PainsOnSlate (20254)
• Canada
6 Jan 16
Very interesting, you might want to write to the company and they might give you another - for free. Just asking the question could be fun. I have no idea why the Ironing would be different on two that appear to be the same.
5 people like this
@pgiblett (6595)
• Canada
6 Jan 16
That is an interesting thought and something I should have done 6 years ago.
2 people like this
• Canada
7 Jan 16
@pgiblett oh I get it, old story but an interesting one so kudos on that.
1 person likes this
@pgiblett (6595)
• Canada
7 Jan 16
@PainsOnSlate Nothing wrong with an old story.
1 person likes this
@Marcyaz (35670)
• United States
5 Jan 16
That is exactly like when you buy two of the same brand of jeans and one you try on and it fits perfectly so you think why try on the other but when you get home the second pair is either to small or to big. How can this be same as with your shirts.
4 people like this
@pgiblett (6595)
• Canada
5 Jan 16
I suspect the same problem manufacturing defects.
1 person likes this
@paigea (22199)
• Canada
15 Jan 16
@Marcyaz My husband used to work in a sewing factory. They cut out a stack of jeans at once and some pieces can end up being a little "off"
2 people like this
@pgiblett (6595)
• Canada
15 Jan 16
@paigea Those working in the factory often know the truth behind the process.
1 person likes this
• United States
5 Jan 16
Do they feel the same to the touch? Its possible they aren't really identical in all regards.
2 people like this
@pgiblett (6595)
• Canada
5 Jan 16
They feel the same. I suspect something went wrong in the manufacturing process for one of the shirts.
2 people like this
• United States
5 Jan 16
@pgiblett I guess things like that do happen.
2 people like this
@pgiblett (6595)
• Canada
5 Jan 16
@AbbyGreenhill I think the easy-iron component is added to the mix when the cloth is formed.
1 person likes this
@OneOfMany (12423)
• United States
27 Jan 16
I was thinking of an actual shirt puzzle that I saw once. It had several equations on it. After looking at it for a moment I got it and started laughing. This is what it said: E/c^2, sqrt of -1, PV/nR (answers: m, i, T) It was a shirt for MIT.
1 person likes this
@pgiblett (6595)
• Canada
27 Jan 16
There certainly have been some interesting tee shirts with such slogans etc. I like that one.
1 person likes this
@OneOfMany (12423)
• United States
27 Jan 16
@pgiblett I was laughing because I was thinking how so many people would be clueless to those equations. Certainly Einstein's energy equation should be fairly common. And the imaginary number is simple high school stuff, along with the pressure and temperature equation.
1 person likes this
@pgiblett (6595)
• Canada
27 Jan 16
@OneOfMany But your concept of shirt puzzle has sent me thinking in a new direction.
1 person likes this
• United States
8 Jan 16
I wonder if it has anything to do with each color, I doubt it, but I wonder if it affects the material differently. Good you iron your shirts.
1 person likes this
@pgiblett (6595)
• Canada
8 Jan 16
That is true the elements of the dyes may differ, thank you. I have always ironed my shirts and always will
1 person likes this
• United States
8 Jan 16
@pgiblett It is an excellent habit. I enjoy ironing. Welcome
1 person likes this
@pgiblett (6595)
• Canada
9 Jan 16
@TiarasOceanView I can's say I enjoy it, but it is a necessary chore if you don't wish to look like a vagabond.
1 person likes this
@just4him (117005)
• Green Bay, Wisconsin
7 Jan 16
I would say they are different fabric, but from what you said, they aren't, so I have no idea why one is easy and the other difficult.
1 person likes this
@pgiblett (6595)
• Canada
7 Jan 16
From my understanding the "easy-iron" element was added to the fabric chemically. the only explanation that makes sense to me is that one of the fabrics didn't get treated. I have many other pairs of shirts and they all act the same.
2 people like this
@just4him (117005)
• Green Bay, Wisconsin
7 Jan 16
@pgiblett That makes sense.
1 person likes this
• United States
6 Jan 16
It is also a curiosity that you are ironing shirts in 2016. I don't know anyone who does anymore. They come out of the dryer crisp and ready to wear.
1 person likes this
@pgiblett (6595)
• Canada
6 Jan 16
I wouldn't show up at an interview or board meeting with one that just came out of the drier without ironing it. I guess is is my habit.
1 person likes this
• United States
6 Jan 16
@pgiblett Probably. Maybe it is what you buy. Some shirts need an ironing, most do not.
1 person likes this
@Missmwngi (9812)
• Nairobi, Kenya
10 Jan 16
Ha haa maybe materials are not exactly the same
1 person likes this
@pgiblett (6595)
• Canada
10 Jan 16
To feel them they are, but that is no guarantee. Thanks.
@TheHorse (65785)
• Pleasant Hill, California
7 Jan 16
This is the kind of question I like to ponder. Same shirt. Different color. They should respond to the iron similarly. I believe this is the kind of thing that makes people stop being empiricists and give themselves over to God.
1 person likes this
@pgiblett (6595)
• Canada
7 Jan 16
I don't think it is a question for God or any other supreme being, the anser to me is entirely in the human realm. I appreciate you humour.
• Preston, England
6 Jan 16
I never iron clothes - tee shirts don't need it. If I need a suit pressing I'll send it out
@pgiblett (6595)
• Canada
6 Jan 16
Sorry Arthur, but I think that is pure laziness. I always wear good looking shirts, In the summer, maybe I will wear a tee shirt, but even a good tee shirt needs ironing.
1 person likes this
• Preston, England
6 Jan 16
@pgiblett I need ironing, let alone my shirts
1 person likes this
@pgiblett (6595)
• Canada
6 Jan 16
1 person likes this
@JudyEv (123167)
• Bunbury, Australia
5 Jan 16
Do they have the same composition? Maybe one has more polyester or whatever.
@pgiblett (6595)
• Canada
5 Jan 16
They are both cotton and feel the same.
1 person likes this
@JudyEv (123167)
• Bunbury, Australia
6 Jan 16
@pgiblett That seems really strange. What a bummer.
@pgiblett (6595)
• Canada
6 Jan 16
@JudyEv I know. I have had the shirts for years now and the creases get harsher and harsher in the green shirt.
1 person likes this
@else34 (13610)
• New Delhi, India
11 Jan 16
@pgiblett,It shows the difference in quality.Why don't you contact the company?
@pgiblett (6595)
• Canada
11 Jan 16
Too late for that.
1 person likes this
• United States
7 Jan 16
Maybe they were made in different countries? Or perhaps different material also!
@pgiblett (6595)
• Canada
7 Jan 16
I hadn't thought about them being from different countries.
@salonga (28016)
• Philippines
7 Jan 16
Creases everywhere will make me so impatient. I will definitely return that item and state specifically the reason why.
@pgiblett (6595)
• Canada
7 Jan 16
They drives me mad as well.
1 person likes this
• United States
5 Jan 16
It's weird how similar clothes can be do different. I have two pairs of pants that are exactly the same (one black, the other navy) and both fit differently.
@pgiblett (6595)
• Canada
6 Jan 16
sound like a similar case.
@jaboUK (53935)
• United Kingdom
5 Jan 16
Very intriguing - I wonder if it's something to do with the colouring used.
@pgiblett (6595)
• Canada
5 Jan 16
I wouldn't deny that thought either.
1 person likes this