Magical Mystery Mushrooms

Mystery Mushrooms
United States
January 18, 2016 10:39am CST
I love roses and have two Double Delight Hybrid Tea roses planted in my front courtyard. Yesterday morning I saw these two mushrooms have decided to live there too. I have never seen mushrooms this shape before and have no idea how or why they appeared. Perhaps they like the soil and growing conditions. This morning, I noticed that they have magically changed their shape. The tubular form has transformed into the little parasol tops that I am used to seeing on mushrooms. They have also turned from the creamy white color they were yesterday to a darker hue, with an deep black ring around the edges of their round tops. I live in suburbia and not a wooded forest. I am unaccustomed to seeing this type of mushroom. We occasionally have tiny white mushrooms show up in damp flower beds, but not giants like these. Anyone know what they are, why they grew and if they are edible? Not to worry, I would never eat a plant that just showed up on its own. I am far too careful about what I eat to do so; even if someone told me this is edible, and they gather them all the time. I’m just curious. Don’t they need something to get them started, a spore or seed?
23 people like this
23 responses
@Susan2015 (21673)
• United States
18 Jan 16
No idea how they get there. We get the huge topped ones in the backyard.
6 people like this
• United States
18 Jan 16
I have seen that type in neighbors' lawns, but not mine. I wonder why they show up in some places, but not others.
2 people like this
@RasmaSandra (19660)
• Daytona Beach, Florida
18 Jan 16
@ElizabethWallace have no idea about these mushroom but we get mushrooms growing in our garden and they are definitely edible. Perhaps they are the Alice in Wonderland type of mushrooms that you eat to get larger and smaller.
2 people like this
• United States
18 Jan 16
@RasmaSandra Too scary of an idea for me to even think about.
2 people like this
@andriaperry (58503)
• United States
18 Jan 16
I have no idea and mushroom are magic! I have so many colors and shapes come up all over. I would never pick and eat any of them because I do not know anything about harvesting. But they are pretty :)
5 people like this
• United States
18 Jan 16
I was told as a child to never even touch them, because some are poisonous. But they look similar to those in the market, so who knows?
3 people like this
@AnneEJ (4979)
• Dollard-Des-Ormeaux, Quebec
18 Jan 16
I have often seen similar things come up in a garden or on a lawn, but have no idea how to distinguish if they are mushrooms or just some other fungus.
4 people like this
• United States
18 Jan 16
It looks like we are in the same boat then.
2 people like this
@Raelove (17579)
• Saco, Maine
18 Jan 16
I can't tell you if they're edible or not, but I can tell you that they got there one of two ways: a spore was transported to the spot by a bird, an insect, the rain, or the wind; or the mushrooms are part of an underground network of root tissue that can run hundreds of feet and, in some cases, miles. The mushrooms are simply part of the reproductive piece of the entire organism, and the only part that is visible above ground. Your soil must be very rich in organic matter for them to decide to pop out there.
3 people like this
• United States
18 Jan 16
Yes, I used Mel's Mix, soil from the Square Foot Gardening organization. One third peat, one third compost and one third vermiculite.
3 people like this
@Raelove (17579)
• Saco, Maine
19 Jan 16
@ElizabethWallace Mushrooms thrive in that sort of damp rich soil. Not surprising they chose your garden. Peat retains moisture while compost is rich in nutrients. There's your answer!
3 people like this
• United States
19 Jan 16
@Raelove Okay, but do you know which variety they are?
1 person likes this
@jaboUK (55053)
• United Kingdom
19 Jan 16
It sounds to me as if there were spores in the soil/compost you used to plant the roses.
3 people like this
• United States
19 Jan 16
I don't think that is possible, since it was bagged and sterilized, but the wind certainly blows here.
2 people like this
@MALUSE (43467)
• Uzbekistan
18 Jan 16
Rachel has explained that very well. --- In our town in autumn during mushroom season you can take your collection of mushrooms from the forest to an expert who'll tell you if they're edible or not. -- This doesn't help you, of course.
3 people like this
• United States
18 Jan 16
If I lived in such an area, I am sure there would be handy helpful information. Not here, of course.
2 people like this
@Drosophila (16699)
• Ireland
18 Jan 16
they look edible, but I won't give it a shot. I think they look like a derivative of the oyster mushroom.
2 people like this
• United States
18 Jan 16
I find all this stuff very interesting, like a mystery, but I would never eat anything from the wild.
2 people like this
@Drosophila (16699)
• Ireland
18 Jan 16
@ElizabethWallace I used to eat some wood/wild picked mushrooms in France, it's gorgeous
2 people like this
• United States
19 Jan 16
@Drosophila Did you have someone with you to let you know they were safe?
1 person likes this
@suziecat7 (3393)
• Asheville, North Carolina
18 Jan 16
I live in a forest setting and see all kinds of amazing mushrooms (none edible). Like you, I usually grab the camera. Nature is always surprising.
2 people like this
• United States
19 Jan 16
Better to grab the camera than the mushrooms. Lasts longer and is far safer.
@LadyDuck (175750)
• Switzerland
19 Jan 16
Those mushrooms are cute, many showed up in my lawn last Spring when it rained a lot.
1 person likes this
• United States
19 Jan 16
I thought they were unique because of their shape. I was surprised when they opened.
2 people like this
@LadyDuck (175750)
• Switzerland
19 Jan 16
@ElizabethWallace They will change more in the next few days.
2 people like this
• United States
19 Jan 16
@LadyDuck Today they are almost completely black. Very odd.
1 person likes this
@JudyEv (134735)
• Bunbury, Australia
19 Jan 16
Firstly I love the Double Delight rose. It is one of my favourites. I don't know much about mushrooms except to be very careful which ones you eat!
1 person likes this
• United States
19 Jan 16
I only eat those from the supermarket or in restaurants. I'm very careful what I eat.
1 person likes this
@JudyEv (134735)
• Bunbury, Australia
19 Jan 16
@ElizabethWallace I read a book called Fields of Noon by Sheila Burnford and it was the first time I'd ever realised that mushrooms other than the one sort I knew about could be non-poisonous. Here's a photo of some pretty toadstools. It was taken in Ireland.
1 person likes this
• United States
20 Jan 16
@JudyEv They are pretty. So is the grass, great color.
1 person likes this
@TheHorse (72311)
• Walnut Creek, California
18 Jan 16
If they're "special," maybe I'll break out my old Carlos Castaneda books and brew up some tea. My mailing address is...
1 person likes this
• Laguna Woods, California
19 Jan 16
Ah ha! I know exactly the type of "special mushrooms" you are expecting. I'm afraid you would be disappointed by these. LOL
2 people like this
• United States
19 Jan 16
@DeborahDiane Isn't there a Beatles song about those?
1 person likes this
@TheHorse (72311)
• Walnut Creek, California
20 Jan 16
@DeborahDiane heh heh. I'd probably wind up in the hospital instead of flying around with the birds.
@DeborahDiane (23746)
• Laguna Woods, California
19 Jan 16
Mushrooms and, more likely, poisonous toadstools, can show up anywhere that is wet and gets a lot of shade. It is often a sign that an area of your yard is over-watered. I wouldn't eat them, either.
1 person likes this
• United States
19 Jan 16
Well, we did have all that rain. I watered Sunday for the first time since it rained.
1 person likes this
• Laguna Woods, California
21 Jan 16
@ElizabethWallace - I'm sure the rain we have been having will bring out mushrooms all over our area!
1 person likes this
• United States
21 Jan 16
@DeborahDiane I just hope it helps with the wildlife issue. If the small animals are able to get food and water away from people, then the bigger ones will have no need to enter peoples' yards.
• China
19 Jan 16
There must be spores and hyphae of this fungus in your courtyard,which looks like Anellaria semiovata that can cause illusion if you eat it . The part shaped like parasol is its fruiting body . Photo credit: baidu.com
1 person likes this
• United States
19 Jan 16
You nailed it with this photo. Mine do not have that touch of pink, however.
1 person likes this
• China
20 Jan 16
@ElizabethWallace Oh,if so ,don't know what kind yours is.
1 person likes this
@nanette64 (17934)
• Fairfield, Texas
19 Jan 16
You may want to go to: they have 3,000 photos of mushrooms and info @ElizabethWallace .
http://wwwrogersmushrooms.com/gallery/chooser.asp
1 person likes this
• United States
19 Jan 16
Thanks. I will check it out.
1 person likes this
@shshiju (10567)
• Cochin, India
19 Jan 16
Mushrooms are my favorite dish. It is interesting how they change their size.
1 person likes this
• United States
19 Jan 16
I had no clue they could, but it was very cool to watch.
1 person likes this
@salonga (27954)
• Philippines
19 Jan 16
I have no idea whether they are edible or not but certainly I won't eat them either even if someone says it is edible.
1 person likes this
• United States
19 Jan 16
Not to worry. I would never. Too chicken.
1 person likes this
@LoriAMoore (4677)
• United States
24 Jan 16
We get mushrooms after it's been especially rainy, but other than that none.
@Tampa_girl7 (26198)
• United States
22 Jan 16
I am unfamiliar with these mushrooms.
@allknowing (69306)
• India
21 Jan 16
I would never risk giving any recommendation as mushroom needs to be handeled with kid gloves so to say. Most I am told are poisonous. I only know of two - button and oyster which are cultured. We did try to grow the oyster variety and met with pretty good success.
@Inlemay (16875)
• South Africa
21 Jan 16
strange that you have mentioned mushrooms - I had one appear in my garden yesterday - I was told not to eat it!