My First Step As a Dealer --- Childhood Memories (2)

@MALUSE (37827)
Germany
January 18, 2016 11:49am CST
How small a child’s world is! The yard behind and the street in front of the house were all I knew and needed. What joy when the goat had kids and we could play with them. I also had a trained hen once which came to me, spread its wings and allowed me to stroke it! The street was a cul-de-sac, fenced off from the goods station/freight depot of the town with a row of houses on either side. From early spring to late autumn hordes of children used to play in the dirt and mud (the pavement had no asphalt) or in the street. No probs as there were no private cars around in those days. We were always dirty. In winter we went tobogganing on a slope nearby. Quite often Soviet tanks stood on the other side of the fence, watched by bored young soldiers who let us climb onto the tanks occasionally. They had no presents for us, though, as the American soldiers had for the children in West Germany. No chewing-gum from them! Instead we gave them something sometimes. Poor sods, thousands of kilometres away from home, badly housed, badly dressed and badly fed. The winners of the war, but also the losers. One event has become family lore. My grandmother, always a business woman, had heard that coal had been unloaded at the goods station. Yet, the whole area was off limits for German civilians. So she packed some ripe pears in a bag and sent me through the hole in the fence through which the children used to crawl to the Soviet soldiers and told me to exchange them for some coal briquets. Which I did. How I managed language-wise, I can’t say. I was only four or five years old! ----- If you're interested in more childhood memories, click on the green bar 'MALUS CHILDHOOD MEMORIES' above the title.
23 people like this
23 responses
• United States
18 Jan 16
You have very detailed memories for that age.
1 person likes this
@MALUSE (37827)
• Germany
18 Jan 16
'family lore' means that an event is recounted very often. This helps to remember it.
2 people like this
@IreneVincent (16033)
• United States
18 Jan 16
I loved this story of yours from your childhood. I could just picture it all and wondered what that could have been like for you to grow up in that neighborhood, so close to the Soviet tanks. Thank you so much for sharing that memory.
1 person likes this
@boiboing (12207)
• Northampton, England
18 Jan 16
Great story.
1 person likes this
@RasmaSandra (16566)
• Riga, Latvia
18 Jan 16
@MALUSE makes me remember what my parents would tell me about the language barriers in the DP camps in Germany in WWII. It was clever of your grandma so that you could get the coal needed.
1 person likes this
@marlina (71208)
• Canada
18 Jan 16
I am sure it is a real memory.
1 person likes this
@AnneEJ (5025)
• Dollard-Des-Ormeaux, Quebec
18 Jan 16
What an interesting memory. It must have been very hard for you and your family living in that war-time period.
1 person likes this
@pgiblett (6603)
• Canada
18 Jan 16
That is typical for a child, knowing no better you just get on with it and turn it to your advantage. I guess the soldiers remembered their kids back home.
1 person likes this
@amnabas (9962)
• Karachi, Pakistan
18 Jan 16
Wow these old memories reveals those happenings for you while writing for this.
1 person likes this
@Tampa_girl7 (24898)
• United States
26 Feb 16
You had a very interesting childhood. Your memories that I have read thus far would make a good book.
@MALUSE (37827)
• Germany
26 Feb 16
Glad you like them. But no. These are just snippets. They wouldn't make a book.
@SHAMRACK (8384)
• India
19 Jan 16
Thanks for sharing such interesting memories ...moreover while reading those line felt I was there watching all those...
@MALUSE (37827)
• Germany
19 Jan 16
Thank you! -- I've just posted the next installment.
1 person likes this
@paigea (21755)
• Canada
31 Jan 16
Oh my, that was quite an adventure for a 4 year old.
@garymarsh6 (13204)
• United Kingdom
23 Jan 16
excellent. We used to toboggan on our local hills. I often used to get a clout for taking a silver tray out to use as a sledge all the other kids used to take out metal trays to slide on I used to tell my mum. I just guess they were not silver! Oops!
@Inlemay (16484)
• South Africa
21 Jan 16
There were no winners of the war - everyone came away with some scars . . . .
@gr8nana6 (2207)
• United States
21 Jan 16
Yup you did what was neccessary to get what you need. You sure learned from an early age how to wheel and deal @MALUSE
@LeaPea2417 (19055)
• Toccoa, Georgia
19 Jan 16
Awe, the joys of childhood and the imagination of youth. You had a good happy childhood.
@nanette64 (17098)
• Fairfield, Texas
19 Jan 16
Wow, an excellent story @MALUSE . Those were some scary times.
@Daljinder (21017)
• India
19 Jan 16
Gah! to live inside your head even for a day You have great recollection of that time and such wonderful memories. And the way you express it in your writing just suck you all the way in.
@LadyDuck (146931)
• Switzerland
19 Jan 16
I imagine that your grandmother reminded you so many times those past events that you will never forget. This is what my grandmother did, war and post war memories.
@JudyEv (118544)
• Bunbury, Australia
19 Jan 16
There is more than one way to get what you want. What a resourceful woman your grandmother was.
@jaboUK (53411)
• United Kingdom
18 Jan 16
That sounds like a pretty good trade - coal for pears. This is so interesting, thanks for telling us about how things were back then.