Home Is Where The Heart Is...

United States
February 16, 2016 11:16am CST
Home Is Where The Heart Is That’s a very old saying. I really don’t know who said it first. But, as I was thinking about it, I wondered how I would explain where my heart really calls home. I was born in a “company house” in a small coal mining town in West Virginia and moved away from there when I was just four years old. Although I do remember living there (barely) I do not have a real attachment to that house. I’ve been back to that house a few times and I slowly drove down that street and looked at the house. I should have knocked on the door and asked if I could come in and look around, but I didn’t. I don’t live in West Virginia anymore, but I have gone back many times to visit family members. I still have a few cousins who live there. I then lived in another house in West Virginia, and lived there until I got married. That house has been torn down, but I did drive by where it used to be. I have many good memories of that house, but it doesn’t mean “home” to me anymore. I’ve lived in several different states with my husband and in Japan for a while, but I don’t consider any of those places home either. Where I live now is very pleasant but I’ve only lived here a short time. Eleven years. So, I’ve decided that the HOUSES in which I have lived are not what are important to me. Being near to my children and grandchildren is what is important to me now. If my parents were still alive, I would want to be near them, but they are gone, along with ALL my aunts and uncles. I am in the oldest generation of my family now and my HOME is here. What do you think?
4 people like this
5 responses
@Teep11 (6269)
• United States
16 Feb 16
Home may be home for a short period of time or for the majority of our lives. We may often think about it when it's time to leave but moving on to a bigger a better home is apart of life.
2 people like this
• United States
17 Feb 16
I'm sure that a person could make any house a home. That's what I've had to do all my life. I have mostly pleasant memories of all the various places I've lived, and I'm happy now where I am, so I think that's what is most important.
• United States
16 Feb 16
Yes, we hauled our kids from pillar to post over the years, we had 16 homes, but it makes for lively discussion over what happened in which home. I grew up in the same house. I love moving around. I do feel at home as soon as my stuff is in it.
1 person likes this
• United States
16 Feb 16
Yes, when you move into a new house and get your "things" arranged, then you can feel like you are at home again. Unfortunately, I couldn't always take my things with me. That's another long story. I wrote about some of that when I posted a discussion about my life in Okinawa. Perhaps you can find that post and read it.
1 person likes this
• United States
16 Feb 16
@IreneVincent That would be very odd to not have your things with you. My aunt lived in occupied Japan after the war and she couldn't take her things either, well except for her kids and clothing!
1 person likes this
@JudyEv (90220)
• Bunbury, Australia
17 Feb 16
My heart was always on the farm where I grew up. It was sold to my cousin - the farm, not my heart! :) I avoided visiting for years but when I eventually had to go back it was so different to what I had in my mind's eye that it didn't even seem the same place. I know when we leave here we'll have to go into town so at that point my heart will remain in the bush.
1 person likes this
@RonElFran (901)
• Mechanicsburg, Pennsylvania
16 Feb 16
After having lived in a number of different houses and cities, I still think of the little house in Tennessee that I grew up in as "home."
1 person likes this
@inertia4 (26354)
• United States
17 Feb 16
Home is always with family. No matter what. One could live in a shack, as long as their family is there that makes all the difference.