Oh, no...it's the dreaded Blossom End Rot

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Eugene, Oregon
August 1, 2016 12:44pm CST
I have two tomato plants (Big Beef variety) and I have a beef with them. They have grown nicely; I have avoided over watering them, fertilized them, even spoken encouraging words to them. As you see, there are a good many tomatoes, still green so far. But, there was one with a red glow that increased daily until I felt it was ripe and ready. As I took it in my hand though, I saw an ugly brown circle around the bottom. Googling "brown circles on the bottom of my tomatoes," I soon found the name of my problem along with various remedies. Calcium seemed to be the key, so I bought some high calcium tomato pellets and started watering them in. Perhaps I can keep the rot from spreading. Even with the rot, the fruit is still edible; you just cut off the affected part. We had my red one in a salad last night. Delicious! Have you grown tomatoes? Ever had that nasty rot?
11 people like this
11 responses
@Platespinner (17047)
• Winston Salem, North Carolina
2 Aug 16
After my first encounter with blossom end rot I started pulverizing our eggshells and sprinkling them around the base of my tomato plants. It seems to be quite effective.
4 people like this
• Eugene, Oregon
2 Aug 16
Good idea! I will add that too. Thanks!
1 person likes this
@NJChicaa (44998)
• United States
1 Aug 16
I get that with my zucchini and summer squash.
2 people like this
• Eugene, Oregon
1 Aug 16
Yes, I have seen that too. Were you able to stop it?
1 person likes this
@NJChicaa (44998)
• United States
1 Aug 16
@JamesHxstatic I bought calcium powder and sprayed the plants with a solution of that. It helped.
1 person likes this
2 Aug 16
I have seen what you are talking about. I didn't do a garden
2 people like this
• Eugene, Oregon
2 Aug 16
No garden this year? I understand how busy you are.
@UncleJoe (10644)
• Virginia Beach, Virginia
2 Aug 16
Yes, but my dad told me that it was caused by too much chicken manure. Perhaps I should have added salt
2 people like this
• Eugene, Oregon
2 Aug 16
Hmmm No chickens around, but I could use the shells.
1 person likes this
@rina110383 (24070)
2 Aug 16
No, haven't tried to grow one. We don't have a garden at my place. I wish we have one so that I could grow some veggies & fruits.
2 people like this
• United States
1 Aug 16
i use compost tea 'n epsom salts'n my maters 'n the rest'f the garden. reckon such brings that needed calcium (egg shells 'n the compost). i adore home grown maters 'n hopin' to get more'n the 3 i've picked thus far. how's a gal 'pposed to put'p sauces fer winter with 3 maters?? bug bites, worm holes (if'n i find the worm...intact) 'n schtuff such's that don't bother me none. ya jest cut that part out'n toss't 'nto the compost pile :D
2 people like this
@Corbin5 (113412)
• United States
1 Aug 16
My husband grew a few in the past. They were good, but have not grown any lately. Hope the calcium prevents the rot.
2 people like this
@teamfreak16 (41175)
• Colorado Springs, Colorado
2 Aug 16
No on both counts. But it's fascinating how easily it can be corrected.
1 person likes this
• Eugene, Oregon
2 Aug 16
I am hoping that it can be before all those green ones ripen.
1 person likes this
• United States
2 Aug 16
Yes, and no. If I got tomatoes at all, they were great. But what happened before I gave up gardening, is the weather stunted too many plants. Sigh,.
1 person likes this
@shaggin (37317)
• United States
2 Aug 16
I don't think I have ever seem this before but I also don't grow any
1 person likes this
@jaboUK (54872)
• United Kingdom
2 Aug 16
That must be disappointing, but at least you could eat the rest of the tomato. I don't grow anything I can eat.