How unresourceful?

@artemeis (4023)
China
August 25, 2016 4:07am CST
I can understand that the French are rather tensed after being targeted by the terrorists lately. But, I have to give their law enforcement's the thumbs down when they go about the beaches seeking that the Muslim women remove their Burkini, which is their rights to observe their religion. I am sure there can be other ways to ensure the security but to insist the removal is just not right. There are equipment that could detect these things and if the police aren't using it then the failure would be on them. Ref:
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7 people like this
6 responses
@youless (87480)
• Guangzhou, China
26 Aug 16
I wonder whether the police really has no other choices so that they have to make the Muslim women to remove their Burkini in the beach. Perhaps they can be checked by the policewomen. After all, they have their religion and they will really feel uncomfortable to remove their Burkini in public.
2 people like this
@artemeis (4023)
• China
26 Aug 16
Exactly, I hate to say this but this terrorism issue is really going paranoia.
1 person likes this
@vandana7 (57677)
• India
17 Oct 16
I think it is not something within their religion. Religion is different from rules. Religion is laid down by the prophet, rules are developed by others. Pretty much like for tax you have Act and rules...Act would be what god said, rules are by others...rules can change according to situations and circumstances as long as they do not lose the essence of act..that is the idea...act however remains the fundamental thing. Such things should be explained to people from every religion. That way, they would know what to revise and where to remain open to changes. Personally, if it was in the interest of my country, and fellow countrymen and countrywomen and children and even others to whom my country is playing host, I would be open to removing burkini.
1 person likes this
@artemeis (4023)
• China
17 Oct 16
I believe you are aware that the bylaws and penal codes of certain countries are established on the foundations of their religion. So when the practices does not progress along with the developments overtime, it will just be seemingly cumbersome, insensitive and impractical. At the other end, I don't see how they could be hypocritical when it comes to religion tolerance, doing everything contrary to what is being advocated, as in the case of France, here.
1 person likes this
@vandana7 (57677)
• India
17 Oct 16
@artemeis .. True...but it is still not the word of prophet or god. It means there might be other tenets or what the lord says that may have to be given precedence over what this foundation can import. It is always a comparative way I suppose. First priority is love for humanity in all religions and then mercy to life forms...as far as I understand. Then there are codes of conduct. When two are in conflict there should be extent of damage and extent of irreparable damage that would happen that needs to be considered for deciding which bylaws and penal codes can be overlooked. Likewise, purpose matters. But everything has been made so rigid!!! Take for example, somebody steals some money for food to be used for his and his family's survival out of no choice, can he be on par with another person who just wants to increase his or her bank balance and add to some expensive collection of his? Both may steal the same amount, but the purpose differs. One is doing out of necessity, other is doing out of addiction.
@vandana7 (57677)
• India
17 Oct 16
@artemeis .. There we differ. :) I agree...inflexibility in religion is like a pond in which the dirt keeps on accumulating..it needs to be cleaned periodically. In fact, chastity of women is at greater risk with Burkinis...I could wear that and go to a guy nobody would be able to tell whether it was me or another person. Likewise, a guy could come to me in Burkini and everybody would think I am only talking to a girl...smh..weird logic.
1 person likes this
• China
26 Aug 16
I don't think this behaviour becomes law enforcement's.It is not to much to say it was a brutal law enforcement.
1 person likes this
@artemeis (4023)
• China
27 Aug 16
I believe over excessive should be a more suitable term since they are law enforcement. Anyway they (French authorities) were really going at it.
1 person likes this
@Daljinder (19945)
• India
25 Aug 16
I agree that it is not right. Same thing with removal of turbans of Sikh.
1 person likes this
@artemeis (4023)
• China
25 Aug 16
Oh? What happened there? I never knew this actually took place. Goodness and the "free" world seems to talk so much about freedom and rights. Sikhs need to wear their turbans and now they are being forced to remove it?
@Happy2BeMe (70776)
• Canada
25 Aug 16
That is not right. They should not be allowed to do that. These women have their rights. Makes me sad to think that it has come to that.
1 person likes this
@artemeis (4023)
• China
25 Aug 16
Well, it is sad indeed. I hope the French authorities will respect the womenfolks who are keeping in line with their religion. They can always conduct a search or spot checks. Just don't ask them to do something against their religion.
1 person likes this
• Philippines
27 Aug 16
The government was just scared after the attacks that hit their country, mostly every one is afraid at these moment. So I don't entirely blame them if they ban burkini.
@artemeis (4023)
• China
28 Aug 16
I don't see the point especially when there are so many ways to prevent future attacks. Also, it is a fact that the attacks were due to their lack of action on good intelligence - complacency being singled out. So I find this rather lame on the French authorities.