A New Word Every Day

United States
September 27, 2016 8:55am CST
Here’s an interesting word. “gloaming” This word is not used very much anymore, but it was used in poetry and in songs of long ago. It means “twilight” or “dusk.” To use it in a sentence: You can often see the deer emerge from the forest to graze in the meadow, in the gloaming of the day. I came across this word recently, while reading a novel based in the early 1900s. I had heard it before and knew what it meant, but I think that this word is not familiar to most persons today. Picture by Pixabay
6 people like this
5 responses
@Happy2BeMe (74997)
• Canada
27 Sep 16
Very interesting. I had never heard the work gloaming before. I must use it some time just to see what people have to say. lol So here is another day that I learn something new!
2 people like this
• United States
27 Sep 16
It's always good to learn. Keep learning because it keeps your mind young and active.
1 person likes this
@Happy2BeMe (74997)
• Canada
27 Sep 16
1 person likes this
@KristenH (24736)
• Cuyahoga Falls, Ohio
27 Sep 16
This is interesting. It might work for poetry and not too much for writing novels or short stories though. It seems old-fashioned or archaic I think.
1 person likes this
• United States
27 Sep 16
Yes, it's a very old-fashioned word, rarely used anymore.
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@KristenH (24736)
• Cuyahoga Falls, Ohio
27 Sep 16
@IreneVincent A shame.
1 person likes this
@responsiveme (16835)
• India
27 Sep 16
I knew it from poetry we studied.
1 person likes this
• United States
27 Sep 16
Yes, you will often find this word in poetry and songs too. I think there is a HYMN also that uses this word. I can't remember which song though.
@BellaDoc (774)
• San Diego, California
2 Apr 17
The song "Roaming in the Gloaming" was one of, if not the, most popular songs in 1930s Scotland and the colonies. By (Sir) Harry Lauder.
@MALUSE (42534)
• Germany
2 Apr 17
For my ears, it sounds like: looking in a grumpy way. :-)