On your Mark, Get set, buy?

By Jen
@polyxena (2573)
Sturgis, Michigan
September 30, 2016 7:09pm CST
Today I was in a debate since now that I"m fully paid off for my Chromebook, to buy my first DSLR camera, I'm still new to the whole camera thing, but QVC has Mark 5 for $450, I decided to go to Walmart to day to compare prices, and learned that Walmart's price is a whole lot more than I would pay for QVC. The camera at Walmart with the kit lens was $600, and the one I wanted from QVC is $250 less, comes with 2 lenses, and a bag. I prefer the $450 rather than the $600. For those who have DSLR's are the Mark 5 okay for beginners or should I go cheaper? I don't want something that doesn't work well for beginnners.
2 people like this
2 responses
@yukimori (9098)
• United States
1 Oct 16
I'm not sure exactly which camera you're looking at. Canon makes the 5D series, but the newest model in that lineup is the 5D Mark IV... and that's a model that starts at around $3,500 for just the body with no lenses. If you don't mind posting a link to the camera you're looking at, I can give you more information about it specifically. I didn't see one at the price point you mentioned in the search I did on the QVC website. Anyway, in general the camera body isn't as big of a deal as the lenses you use with it. What sort of pictures do you take in general? Do you do a lot of action shots, wildlife photography, or do you stick more with portraits? Different lenses are better suited to different applications, so that can influence it. Generally speaking, someone who's just starting out with their first DSLR will be just fine with the kit lens... I would personally recommend a slightly longer zoom lens than the 18-55mm that usually comes with the entry-level DSLRs, though. The quality of something like an 18-105mm is a bit better than the 18-55mm, and it gives you the ability to zoom in a bit farther. If you're used to a point-and-shoot, that might be something to look for. I recommend starting out with a single lens and figuring out what your preferences are through using it. If you notice you don't use the wide angles much, but spend a lot of time zooming in on your subject, you might want to make a telephoto lens your next purchase. If you take a lot of portraits, having a 50mm f/1.8 in your bag will be a great idea--they're inexpensive lenses but they give great quality from any of the major manufacturers. As far as choosing one system over the other goes... pick one that's going to be the most comfortable to you. I chose to go with Nikon specifically because the cameras consistently felt more comfortable to hold than Canon's DSLRs did. Go to an electronics store that has a selection of them, or head over to a camera store and play around with several models. Even a basic entry level model will suit you well, and you can upgrade as you need to by investing in better lenses to go with it.
@polyxena (2573)
• Sturgis, Michigan
1 Oct 16
I was going with this camera, I guess it was a rebel and not a mark. But I was thinking more portraits, hopefully, more still life stuff for my blogging (since I'm picky and am not too thrilled with regular cameras picture consistency or my phone). I didn't mind the point and shoot cameras but I don't know it's not really what I felt comfortable with. It's kind of weird.
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@yukimori (9098)
• United States
1 Oct 16
@polyxena I was wondering if that was the one you were looking at. Canon's lineup of DSLR cameras is excellent, and the T5 will be a great starting point for you. You'll have a variety of automatic scene modes available, plus you'll be able to venture into manual mode and choose all of the camera's settings by yourself. I'd personally stick with the 75-300mm lens for portraits and still lifes, but I really like shooting with telephoto lengths because of how well it can isolate the subject from the background. If you play around with them a bit when you get it, you'll find what works best for you. I'll see if I can round up a few of the tutorials that really helped me get started when I got my first SLR a few years ago. I totally get what you mean by saying it's not what you're comfortable with. I like point and shoots for certain purposes, but I'd much rather have my DSLRs any day. Actually, my absolute favorite camera is a big old Mamiya RB67 SLR. It's a monster of a camera, since it's designed for 120 film... but making prints with that thing in a darkroom is pure magic.
@polyxena (2573)
• Sturgis, Michigan
1 Oct 16
@yukimori Ok thanks.
@TRBRocks420 (85873)
• Banks, Oregon
1 Oct 16
I don't know, but hope you get a good one :)
@polyxena (2573)
• Sturgis, Michigan
1 Oct 16
I do have a friend who does photography, but I don't want to bother her too much because her mother's sick. I'm just hoping I know what I'm picking out, I'm just not spending $250 more for something that's the same thign.
1 person likes this
@polyxena (2573)
• Sturgis, Michigan
1 Oct 16
@TRBRocks420 Hopefully if not, $80 a month isn't too unreasonable.
1 person likes this