New girls in the flock!

@Fleura (7199)
United Kingdom
October 7, 2016 4:31pm CST
As you may remember we have some hens who are re-homed ex-battery layers, obtained through the charity the British Hen Welfare Trust. We still have one of our first 3 hens from over two years ago and two from last year so now we just acquired another two scrawny sorry-looking specimens, who haven't yet got the hang of outdoor living; one of them spends almost all her time inside and only comes out to eat. I think now I've got a better understanding of what to expect - although hens can apparently live up to 20 years I think after the intense battery life and the fact they are bred specially to be as productive as possible as quickly as possible they run out of steam after another year or two. But at least they get to enjoy more than half their lives outdoors so that's a good thing. These two have been christened Feathery and Beaky and seem to be settling in OK. They quickly found the food supply and seemed quite excited to eat grass as well, but they look as though they find the feel of grass strange to walk on, often holding one foot high and then putting it down very carefully. They are getting a bit more used to the great outdoors although Beaky is still not that keen, I think she may be finding it cold as well but luckily I can see new feathers growing so she will soon have her own wearable duvet to keep her snug. All rights reserved. © Text and image copyright Fleur 2016.
7 people like this
9 responses
@Corbin5 (103085)
• United States
7 Oct 16
What a wonderful thing you have done for these hens who have spent their lives in cages for far too long!! Love the photo!
2 people like this
@Fleura (7199)
• United Kingdom
8 Oct 16
Thanks! I hope I'll soon be able to post a photo of Beaky looking much more normal!
1 person likes this
@JudyEv (121298)
• Bunbury, Australia
8 Oct 16
Did you see the post where someone was knitting jackets for rehomed battery hens? They were really cute.
1 person likes this
@Fleura (7199)
• United Kingdom
8 Oct 16
I didn't, but I have seen some before. I did wonder whether I should have made some for these two, but with the time I have available for knitting, they will have grown new feathers before I get one finished!
@JudyEv (121298)
• Bunbury, Australia
8 Oct 16
@Fleura That's probably true. I'm sure they'll be fine. The poor things look pretty pitiful when they first come out of the cages, don't they?
1 person likes this
@Fleura (7199)
• United Kingdom
8 Oct 16
@JudyEv Oven-ready is definitely the description that springs to mind. They seem pretty feisty though.
1 person likes this
@BelleStarr (37666)
• United States
7 Oct 16
That is a wonderful thing that you are doing for chickens, I think all chickens should be allowed to be free range.
1 person likes this
@Fleura (7199)
• United Kingdom
8 Oct 16
There is a lot of campaigning going on at the moment to get suppliers to switch.
1 person likes this
@BelleStarr (37666)
• United States
9 Oct 16
@Fleura I saw my first special about caged chickens while I was visiting England and I was sickened by the way they are treated.
1 person likes this
@Fleura (7199)
• United Kingdom
9 Oct 16
@BelleStarr Compassion in World farming is campaigning to 'end the cage age'. I didn't even realise that rabbit farming was such a big thing as we rarely see rabbit in the shops here.
1 person likes this
@LadyDuck (152203)
• Switzerland
8 Oct 16
Poor hens, you so wonderful to give them the possibility to enjoy a better life, even if only for a few years. I have seen dogs that were saved from labs, they also were scared to put their feet on the grass. Poor animals, humans are cruel.
1 person likes this
@Fleura (7199)
• United Kingdom
9 Oct 16
The problem is that everyone is ready to condemn the farmers, but when they are doing the weekly shopping they are often still unwilling to pay a bit extra for free-range eggs. Most people still go for the cheapest price and don't make the connection.
1 person likes this
@LadyDuck (152203)
• Switzerland
9 Oct 16
@Fleura I know, this is a shame, they should oblige to show the photos of the hens, may be (very may be) that people could be more considerate.
1 person likes this
• Eugene, Oregon
7 Oct 16
It is very kind of you to give these hens a decent life. Were they caged before?
1 person likes this
@Fleura (7199)
• United Kingdom
8 Oct 16
Yes they have all been caged so far, they are about 18 months old.
1 person likes this
• Eugene, Oregon
8 Oct 16
@Fleura What a terrible way to treat animals of any kind. I refuse to buy eggs produced that way.
@Ronrybs (7301)
• London, England
10 Oct 16
Should I move back to Rutland, I thought that I should give a home to some ex-battery hens. It is such a horrible life
1 person likes this
@Fleura (7199)
• United Kingdom
10 Oct 16
It is, but you don't have to wait until then - you can do your bit by buying free-range eggs and products (like cakes) made with them.
@Susan2015 (20413)
• United States
8 Oct 16
No animal should ever have to spend all their time in a cage, congrats to taking care of them.
1 person likes this
@Fleura (7199)
• United Kingdom
8 Oct 16
Thanks! They will soon gain confidence and be into everything, like the others!
@PurnaSharma (2072)
• India
8 Oct 16
Good job for providing a them a cage free lives. Almost all pet animals spend their lives in cage..you did so exceptional to them by taking care of them.
1 person likes this
@shivamani10 (11233)
• Hyderabad, India
7 Oct 16
you did a good things with these wonderful hens.
1 person likes this