The Magic of Uluru

@JudyEv (96960)
Bunbury, Australia
November 6, 2016 5:55pm CST
Uluru or Ayers Rock as it was once known is a very sacred and spiritual place to the traditional owners of the land in that area. They were understandably upset when tourists started pouring into the area and climbing all over their sacred rock. Many years later, the land is now managed by a group made up of indigenous and Government representatives. Tourists are asked not to climb the rock but are not forbidden to do so. Our indigenous guide likened it to having all and sundry climbing all over cathedrals with, sometimes, little respect for where they are going. I know there are tours through cathedrals but I'm just passing on the way the 'owners' of the rock see it. We were told that sensors along the rope guide count the number who make the climb. When the number of climbers drops to 20% or less than those entering the National Park, then they may decide to make climbing the rock illegal. Uluru is the second largest monolith in Australia. The largest, Mt Augusta, is in Western Australia. There are several water-holes around the edges of Uluru along with canyons, caves, rock art and weathered and eroded sections. One section is used by the local people for various ceremonies and photography was not permitted in that area. Everyone has to stay, if they're staying, at Yulara which is some 30kms away. This has a variety of accommodation from 5-star hotels down to tent-camping and caravan parks. It is a completely functional town which has sprung up purely and simply to cater for the tourists who come to visit the attractions in the region. On the way out to the rock we saw a variety of flowers and three wild camels. One photo of small, insignificant white flowers is there because I like the shadows the plant made. There is a fee for entry into the National Park where Uluru is situated. The Park closes at 8pm. We spent the whole afternoon there and stayed to take sunset photos. We were there again by 6am next morning to take sunrise photos. Two nights later we took more sunset photos. Because there was no cloud we didn't get anything spectacular other than the standard type of photo.
I created this video with the YouTube Slideshow Creator (http://www.youtube.com/upload)
20 people like this
17 responses
@teamfreak16 (35211)
• Colorado Springs, Colorado
7 Nov 16
Hey, I've actually heard of Uluru! Too bad people are ruining it for all, which seems to be the case all over nowadays.
3 people like this
@JudyEv (96960)
• Bunbury, Australia
7 Nov 16
Many of the tourist sites become very commercialised which is a great shame. With bitumen roads and facilities laid on, these places can become very busy.
@TRBRocks420 (60847)
• Banks, Oregon
7 Nov 16
Wow that's a pretty awesome view.
3 people like this
@JudyEv (96960)
• Bunbury, Australia
7 Nov 16
There is one spot where everyone flocks to get good photos of the sunset. Everyone sets up well beforehand with cameras on tripods, drinks and nibblies. It's quite a social occasion.
@GardenGerty (90217)
• Marion, Kansas
7 Nov 16
This picture is far from ordinary to me. I love the color. I can see that the activity on the monolith could be considered disrespectful.
3 people like this
@JudyEv (96960)
• Bunbury, Australia
7 Nov 16
He had a very good point. He said if he visited someone, he would be on his best behaviour and if he went into another person's church, temple, pagoda, whatever, he'd be even more respectful and polite. I guess because the indigenous people's sacred places are streams, trees, rocks, etc, people don't realise that they might be acting inappropriately.
1 person likes this
@rebelann (31030)
• El Paso, Texas
7 Nov 16
Striking slide show, some of it is similar to our desert here but that rock is totally unique.
2 people like this
@JudyEv (96960)
• Bunbury, Australia
7 Nov 16
It just seems to rise up out of nowhere. Very impressive.
1 person likes this
@rebelann (31030)
• El Paso, Texas
8 Nov 16
Yes, very @JudyEv it must be really hard to climb without that rope.
@Inlemay (17333)
• South Africa
7 Nov 16
Ahhhh the RED ROCK - you said you were going to be seeing it, When we were in Namibia at Sossousvlei and the RED DUNES stood out like huge ant heaps out of nowhere, I imagined it be similar in Australia where I have heard how red the monolith rock is. I learned a new word - Monolith - perfect
2 people like this
@JudyEv (96960)
• Bunbury, Australia
7 Nov 16
And it is no exaggeration to say they are 'red' is it? After a few months in the north some years ago all my clothes had this faint reddish tinge.
2 people like this
@Inlemay (17333)
• South Africa
7 Nov 16
@JudyEv not at all - its RED sand (rock now) and it even stained my rockey sandals - I wonder if there are any other marvels out there in the world that are as red as this
2 people like this
@IvySaysHi (4207)
• United States
7 Nov 16
Is it one of those places where if you take something it makes your life cursed until you return it?
2 people like this
@JudyEv (96960)
• Bunbury, Australia
7 Nov 16
They do ask that you don't remove stones or whatever but I don't think there are any curses attached. :)
2 people like this
@IvySaysHi (4207)
• United States
7 Nov 16
@JudyEv ok was just wondering. looks beautiful
1 person likes this
@JohnRoberts (38885)
• Los Angeles, California
7 Nov 16
My parents have been to Ayers Rock. Maybe someday for me.
2 people like this
@JudyEv (96960)
• Bunbury, Australia
7 Nov 16
It is quite a special place. There were dozens of tour groups as well as many individuals.
• United States
7 Nov 16
wowzers, ms. judy! what a beautiful place that'd be. i loved the various wildflower/shrubbery photos, so much variety there'n yer country to see this time 'f year. i've yet to figure why so many're disrespectful 'f these lands. the same occurs here'n the u.s.'n i'm quite certain elsewhere, too. i loved how there seems to be'n attached appendage off that one side'f the monolith - the result 'f centuries 'f erosion i reckon. that photo 'f the waters with a hint 'f sky reflectin' really caught my eye. gorgeous pics'n great info, hon. big hugs!!
1 person likes this
@JudyEv (96960)
• Bunbury, Australia
7 Nov 16
Thanks. At the place where there is a gap between the main rock and the 'appendage' there is a barrier keeping you well away from the rock at that point. I guess one day they expect it to come free. I guess as regards the respect, some people don't appreciate that the land itself - rocks, trees, water-holes - are seen as sacred by the indigenous folks.
1 person likes this
• United States
7 Nov 16
@JudyEv how fascinatin', ms. judy! i'd so love to see such'n person...perhaps one day (so's i keep tellin' myself). there's many places that're sacred grounds 'n then there's those that nobody's laid claim to such - folks seem to get a kick outta destroyin' 'em anyhow. 't least these days they're dumb 'nough to video such'n put't 'nline - easier to hunt 'em down like the dogs they be 'n prosecute. not that such does any good, the damage 'tis already done :(
1 person likes this
@JudyEv (96960)
• Bunbury, Australia
7 Nov 16
@crazyhorseladycx There is a very clear sign at the Rock saying 'no drones' but someone set one off as we got there. Vince spoke to him and when we passed that way 10 minutes later he'd gone. I hope the rangers caught him.
2 people like this
@TheHorse (51565)
• Pleasant Hill, California
23 Nov
Are wild camels originally from Australia? I'd be interested in the cave paintings.
1 person likes this
@JudyEv (96960)
• Bunbury, Australia
23 Nov
Camels (and Afghan handlers) were brought here to help explore the areas where water was so scarce. Over time, some escaped etc and there are now thousands of feral ones. We now export them to the Middle East because of their high quality. I don't really know a lot about the cave paintings. We saw a few at Uluru but the photo isn't very good.
1 person likes this
@TheHorse (51565)
• Pleasant Hill, California
24 Nov
@JudyEv I've seen a few (cave paintings, not camels) here in the US and always wonder what they were trying to communicate.
1 person likes this
@JudyEv (96960)
• Bunbury, Australia
24 Nov
@TheHorse Some paintings have suggested to experts that aliens landed in the outback once upon a time. Not commenting on that!!
@chiwasaki (4678)
• Philippines
7 Nov 16
This rock seemed to be magical as it stands there alone in the middle of nowhere. I never been to Australia, but I want to see this rock in person.
1 person likes this
@JudyEv (96960)
• Bunbury, Australia
7 Nov 16
It does seem strange that it stands there with no other big rocks around for miles.
1 person likes this
@chiwasaki (4678)
• Philippines
7 Nov 16
@JudyEv Is it possibly a meteor? hehehe
1 person likes this
@JudyEv (96960)
• Bunbury, Australia
8 Nov 16
@chiwasaki I don't think so. There'd be a big hole if it was.
@Platespinner (18073)
• Winston Salem, North Carolina
7 Nov 16
Fantastic photos! That's a place I would love to visit someday.
1 person likes this
@JudyEv (96960)
• Bunbury, Australia
7 Nov 16
It is a lovely place and miles from anywhere. However there were still dozens of people around. I almost preferred some of the less spectacular spots where we might be the only ones there - at least for a while.
1 person likes this
• Winston Salem, North Carolina
7 Nov 16
@JudyEv I understand that. When we went out west a couple of years ago the Grand Canyon was spoiled for us to a certain extent because of the hordes of people there.
1 person likes this
@JudyEv (96960)
• Bunbury, Australia
7 Nov 16
@Platespinner Of course, we're just one or two or three of the hordes but you just wish you could be there on your own.
@Jessicalynnt (48190)
• Centralia, Missouri
7 Nov 16
yay more pics!
1 person likes this
@JudyEv (96960)
• Bunbury, Australia
7 Nov 16
I've only just started really - about day 5 of 21.
1 person likes this
• Centralia, Missouri
8 Nov 16
@JudyEv wow, you do have all kinds of goodies saved for us!
1 person likes this
@marguicha (80377)
• Chile
7 Nov 16
I would not let tourists climb a sacred rock even if I´m a non believer. I don´t think touris will accept a sugestion, but if it is forbidden, then that os that. Beautiful post and picture.
1 person likes this
@JudyEv (96960)
• Bunbury, Australia
7 Nov 16
I don't think it will be too long before they stop people climbing. I think there have been 30 deaths on the rock anyway - mostly from heart attacks I think.
2 people like this
@marguicha (80377)
• Chile
7 Nov 16
@JudyEv That´s too much.
1 person likes this
@DianneN (57300)
• United States
7 Nov 16
Fabulous and goosebumps! The photographs are awesome!!!! I've always wanted to see it up close.
1 person likes this
@JudyEv (96960)
• Bunbury, Australia
7 Nov 16
I'm glad you enjoyed it. I think it gives many people goose-bumps.
1 person likes this
@Ronrybs (7075)
• London, England
7 Nov 16
The classic view! Seen lots of piccies and videos of this sight. While sad about the thought, I can see why people should be kept off the roc
1 person likes this
@JudyEv (96960)
• Bunbury, Australia
7 Nov 16
There were dozens of people all lined up in front of their cars at a carpark, all hoping for the perfect shot. It is certainly the iconic view of it. I don't think it will be too long and they'll be stopping people from climbing on it.
1 person likes this
@Tampa_girl7 (21301)
• United States
7 Nov 16
It is simply magnificent.
1 person likes this
@JudyEv (96960)
• Bunbury, Australia
7 Nov 16
It was very amazing. The colours can be incredibly different according to the weather and light but the weather didn't change much all the time we were there.
1 person likes this
• Rochester, New York
7 Nov 16
That is a beautiful photo! Your hubby is very talented with a camera.
1 person likes this
@JudyEv (96960)
• Bunbury, Australia
7 Nov 16
Thank you. And yes, he loves taking photos. I take nearly as many nowadays but I am not as fussy as he is about settings, etc. :)