Has any scientist proved the theory of Albert Einstein's false?

@shivamani10 (11232)
Hyderabad, India
May 16, 2017 8:25am CST
The velocity of light is 1,98,000 miles/Sec, Sir Albert Einstein in his theory of relativity has concluded that there is nothing in the universe that can travel with a velocity equal to that of light. This is the greatest theory which shook the very foundations of the scientific world. Many physicists tried to disprove his theory. But, they failed miserably. In their eagerness to disprove it's correct they remained unnoticed. Still, we see some clippings here and there that so and so has proved Einstein as wrong which is totally incorrect. Why? It goes by the logic that the more the particle reaches the speed of light its mass increases heavily which needs an infinite amount of energy to drive that particle.
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3 responses
@OneOfMany (12423)
• United States
16 May 17
That's the speed of light in a vacuum. It's been proven that the speed changes based on what light passes through. For example, when light passes through Cesium gas, it speeds up. Anyway, for things to travel faster than light, they need to disconnect with this universe even briefly in order to have less restriction by it. We think of the universe as one perspective, but it's actually multiple ones. Just like a particle has a positive or negative charge, there are positive and negative universes (we're in the negative one, which is why electrons carry a negative charge). For long distance space travel we'd need to pop into the positive universe and bypass a large chunk of space (creating a wormhole). It's pointless to take something into the speed of light, since a small particle of dirt could destroy whatever object plows into it.
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@TheHorse (65774)
• Pleasant Hill, California
18 May 17
Is this a paradox? Or not. If an object is traveling at 100 m/sec, and another object is traveling away from it at 100 m/sec, then isn't the second object going 200 m/sec, or faster than the speed of light, from the perspective of the first?
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@OneOfMany (12423)
• United States
18 May 17
@TheHorse We'll never know, because neither object would see the other one. Not enough time for the light to reflect in order to be seen!
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@TheHorse (65774)
• Pleasant Hill, California
18 May 17
@OneOfMany my brain is melting!
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@Mike197602 (13474)
• Worcester, England
16 May 17
I remember that some scientific research showed neutrinos were capable of going faster than light but CERN showed that to be incorrect.
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@TheHorse (65774)
• Pleasant Hill, California
18 May 17
What exactly is CERN?
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@Mike197602 (13474)
• Worcester, England
18 May 17
@TheHorse it is the european centre for nuclear research and it does research on physics and stuff. I think it is connected to the UN in some way but not exactly sure how.
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@TheHorse (65774)
• Pleasant Hill, California
18 May 17
@Mike197602 Ah, got it. Thanks for the info. I used to be fascinated by Einstein, and even checked out his formulae for special and general relativity. It's not as easy to wrap my head around as is Newtonian mechanics.
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@TheHorse (65774)
• Pleasant Hill, California
18 May 17
I thought it was 186,000 m/sec, but that's nit picking. My brain still can't wrap itself around an object picking up mass as its speed increases. But it would follow that if mass approaches infinity, then an infinite amount of energy (or it it force? I don't know) would be necessary to accelerate the object toward C.