The Megalomaniac WobbleAss

fun
@MALUSE (30188)
Denmark
May 27, 2017 1:23pm CST
I love words, I really do. I even collect them, a very enjoyable hobby, believe me. Words cost nothing, don’t need much space, don’t breed and multiply like, say, Sticky Insects. I have a large collection of side-splittingly, sock-wettingly funny German surnames. If only you knew German well, I could entertain you for the rest of the day. Compound nouns are typical for the German language. English has some words like this, for example bus + driver = bus driver. German has innumerable ones. Innumerable because we can make up new words if we feel like it. Just some examples, I can’t resist: would you like to have as your surname Chicken-leg, Mice-nest (I’m going to write the words with a hyphen so that you can understand them, but they’re really written together as one word), Pig’s-bladder, Faithful-sausage, Morning-sweat, Full-moon, Hollow-belly, Kneel-down, From-behind, Milk-sack, Angst-worm, Courageous-apple, Head-nail, Flour-trousers, Nine-devils, Don’t-laugh, Spoon-wood, Taste-beer, Grumble-belly, Winter-coat etc. etc. These names are fortunately very rare. I’ve been on the look-out for years and have by now collected some hundred. I put a surname into my collection if it has a funny meaning or if it sounds funny. For that I can’t give you examples because you have to have a German ear to react to that. English words can sound funny, too, at least I think so and my students are of the same opinion. Words like blabbermouth, and wobbleass or the expression ‘wallow in blood’ don’t need much explanation. We hear them with our Teutonic ears and understand them immediately. ‘Pupils have pimples’ produces a sure laugh and wins them over to English at once. The older ones find words like ‘megalomaniac’ and other so-called hard words interesting, i.e. words of Greek and Latin origin and squeeze them in wherever possible. They have then to develop a feeling for style and speech levels. Have you got any favourite words in your native language?
16 people like this
11 responses
@andriaperry (28277)
• Anniston, Alabama
27 May
I do but mylot wont allow them.
2 people like this
@pgntwo (20428)
• Derry, Northern Ireland
27 May
There are other words in the dictionary... I am sure one of the alternatives won't be picked up by the myLot bad word checker
1 person likes this
@Tampa_girl7 (21025)
• United States
30 May
Silly Goose comes to mind
1 person likes this
@jstory07 (56106)
• Roseburg, Oregon
30 May
I like saying silly goose.
1 person likes this
@Tampa_girl7 (21025)
• United States
31 May
@garymarsh6 (12060)
• United Kingdom
27 May
There are so many that we use in different occasions but one I often use with my immediate family is Stupifulous. One of my mothers friends used to try to use big words usually mispronouncing them. I coined this word when taking fun out of her once she had left our house and we have used it ever since to describe her or anyone else trying to impress!
1 person likes this
@pgntwo (20428)
• Derry, Northern Ireland
27 May
Schadenfreude, but that probably doesn't count. Flabbergasted is a good one that I use from time to time.
@MALUSE (30188)
• Denmark
27 May
Schadenfreude doesn't count indeed. Flabbergasted, dumbfounded, gobsmacked, befuddled -- are all good words.
1 person likes this
@pgntwo (20428)
• Derry, Northern Ireland
27 May
@MALUSE Soliloquy is another good one.
@MALUSE (30188)
• Denmark
28 May
@pgntwo Soliloquy is good.
1 person likes this
@JudyEv (91955)
• Bunbury, Australia
11 Jun
It's not really a FAVOURITE word but we have a tree called a 'snotty-gobble' which really has horrible connotations. The fruit from the tree has flesh the colour of snot (nasal mucous) and emus are said to gobble up the fruit if they come across it hence 'snotty-gobble'.
@MALUSE (30188)
• Denmark
11 Jun
Wonderful! Pity that my teaching days are over. My pupils would love the word.
1 person likes this
@JudyEv (91955)
• Bunbury, Australia
11 Jun
@MALUSE It is the official word for the tree which really surprises me.
@jaboUK (49067)
• United Kingdom
4 Jun
An interesting post Maluse. I like 'tickety-boo' which means that everything is in order.
@MALUSE (30188)
• Denmark
4 Jun
Is this word still used? It sounds a bit old-fashioned. But what do I know.
1 person likes this
@jaboUK (49067)
• United Kingdom
4 Jun
@MALUSE Yes, it's old fashioned and not much used, but I occasionally use it, tongue in cheek.
28 May
Wobblebottom used to be something the school photographer would say to make us smile. I doubt they're allowed to use that word now! The word Cockwomble always makes me giggle. It's a tad rude.
@MALUSE (30188)
• Denmark
29 May
I had to look up the second term. Look what I've found: Cockwomble: The best insult known to man! Male-directed insult. Also describes the tendency to rummage in your underwear massaging ones genitals as if looking for litter to pick up (hence womble )
@xFiacre (10125)
• Ireland
28 May
@maluse I had a maths teacher who gloried in the name Shufflebottom. Surely that must count.
@MALUSE (30188)
• Denmark
28 May
Yes. I'll accept that.
@Corbin5 (74293)
• United States
28 May
A foolish person is called a nincompoop, and that word brings a smile to my face. Cockamamie means absurd, and it is a lot of fun to use in conversation.
@MALUSE (30188)
• Denmark
28 May
I like nincompoop, too. I'll look out for cockamamie. I haven't encountered it yet or not noticed it.
1 person likes this
@Inlemay (17276)
• South Africa
5 Jun
strange the English language is . . my husband curses Shakespeare every day
@spaceseed (2925)
• India
29 May
untill I read it I didnt understood but now I can find certain level of loopiness in reading it. I will think about few of my favorite word in my native language in my next comment