Don't re-use paper or other types of egg cartons after use.

https://pixabay.com/en/egg-chicken-hen-nature-eggshell-1581947/
Dallas, Texas
August 22, 2017 8:30pm CST
The reason not to re-use them is because of the risk of salmonella cross-contamination. It is better for me to share this link for you to take a look at. The good news is, you can put the paper egg cartons in your compost and this I do recommend based on the information from the article I just read.
Egg cartons are almost never OK to reuse, but that doesn't mean they're garbage. Here are things you can do with them and things you should avoid.
12 people like this
12 responses
@marguicha (78184)
• Chile
23 Aug
I had not thought about it. Thank you very much for the tip!.
2 people like this
• Dallas, Texas
23 Aug
You are welcome.
2 people like this
@marguicha (78184)
• Chile
23 Aug
@lookatdesktop But I found some uses for them
2 people like this
• Dallas, Texas
23 Aug
@marguicha, that is okay if you found uses for them. I am interested in what types of uses you used them for if you don't mind telling me. In any case the initial article suggested there are things you can do with them and things you should not based on the exposure to people who might have health risks if exposed to the salmonella.It may be possible to wash them out with hot soap water. I have not yet considered this until just now.
1 person likes this
@rosedust82 (2076)
• Philippines
23 Aug
This is useful. Does this also include plastic ones? This is what they sell most of the time here.Thanks for sharing.
2 people like this
• Dallas, Texas
23 Aug
I believe the article indicated that any material used for eggs not to be re-used as it poses a health risk for cross-contamination. The article was very informative and I believe it to be accurate. But to be fair, I will add another link on this topic: FDA
Guidance for Industry: Prevention of Salmonella Enteritidis in Shell Eggs During Production, Storage, and Transportation
2 people like this
• Philippines
23 Aug
@lookatdesktop Thank you! I actually re use the plastic egg containers that's why I was a bit worried when I read this. Should stop doing that now.
1 person likes this
• Dallas, Texas
23 Aug
@rosedust82 , Well, if you were to actually wash them first in warm soap water and put them out in the sun to dry, I am pretty sure that most of what could be living on the microscopic level might not be that much of a risk. The thing is, if you are ever in doubt, just go here to find out more:
Is it risky to take your own containers food shopping or to your local takeaway?
@toniganzon (38549)
• Philippines
23 Aug
Oh, we have never reused those at all.
1 person likes this
• Dallas, Texas
23 Aug
I think there is way too much plastic and other things being used to wrap up products that are ruining the oceans and killing all the sea life. This has to stop eventually or we will all be sorry for it.
You love the ocean as much as we do, and we can’t protect it without you. …
@toniganzon (38549)
• Philippines
23 Aug
@lookatdesktop I hardly use plastic. I'm very much concerned of what it does to the environment. But anything that can harm my health or my family's is definitely a disposable item.
1 person likes this
• Dallas, Texas
24 Aug
@toniganzon , you are definitely on the right track to staying healthy by avoiding substances that are harmful. In my case I look for plastic drinking containers that indicate NO BPA.
@responsiveme (13126)
• India
23 Aug
I see people burning them to get rid of mosquitoes which is very bad for the air too
1 person likes this
• Dallas, Texas
23 Aug
Burning certain types of polystyrene foam or other plastics can be hazardous.
What Are the Dangers of Accidentally Burning Styrofoam?. Burning Styrofoam, or polystyrene, is the least appropriate way to get rid of it for both people and the environment. Research has shown that when Styrofoam is burned it releases toxic chemicals and
1 person likes this
• India
24 Aug
@lookatdesktop I know but the people who burn are not bothered
1 person likes this
• Dallas, Texas
24 Aug
@responsiveme , They only would be bothered if they got caught doing it and had to pay a hefty fine for it.
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@vsai2008 (7632)
• India
23 Aug
Thanks for the information, much appreciated :)
1 person likes this
@vsai2008 (7632)
• India
4 Sep
@lookatdesktop Oh okay, I would look into the issue, thank you :) How are you doing today?
@ARIES1973 (9439)
• Legaspi, Philippines
23 Aug
This is very helpful. There are times when I can see some video tutorials showing how to recycle egg cartons which should not be done because it is not advisable. Thank you for sharing.
1 person likes this
• Dallas, Texas
23 Aug
Either find a local recycle plant that will accept those cartons or put them in your compost pile. Otherwise, I see no problem using them to plant small seeds in each to get the little sprouts to spring up. But after that, I would simply dispose of them in the trash.
• Dallas, Texas
23 Aug
You might find this of use:
@Marty1 (23531)
• Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
23 Aug
Thank you for telling us this information. I had not know the problem of reuse could cause. But luckily I have never thought to reuse the cartons and just tossed in garbage I do not have a compost pile as I do not have a garden! But now until know to not try and save them as I sometimes have a hard time throwing things out if they can be used for another purpose!
1 person likes this
• Dallas, Texas
23 Aug
I think they might make good insulation when packing things away for shipping as long as the items shipped are not food of any kind. The thing is, there has to be a way to recycle things instead of just putting them in a land fill. Sooner or later land fills will be totally full and no more room will exist, then we will have to start putting our trash on the moon.
@UncleJoe (7708)
• Virginia Beach, Virginia
23 Aug
That goes double for toilet paper.
1 person likes this
• Dallas, Texas
23 Aug
Wash hands always. Or better yet we all need to install a bidet.
1 person likes this
@Platespinner (17580)
• Winston Salem, North Carolina
23 Aug
My eggs don't come in cartoons and usually sit in the counter on a ceramic egg tray.
1 person likes this
• Dallas, Texas
23 Aug
That is very nice to hear.
@andriaperry (27958)
• Anniston, Alabama
23 Aug
I toss mine in the recycle bin.
1 person likes this
• Dallas, Texas
23 Aug
Paper ones we do as well, but the ones made from foam are apparently are not permitted in our city to recycle. however, there is a place where they in fact do recycle those foam type cartons and other things like it:
Once it’s collected, the foam is recycled into multiple product types, including picture frames, baseboards, and crown molding.
• Philippines
23 Aug
Thanks for the tip, I would probably kept them in the refrigerator.
1 person likes this
• Dallas, Texas
23 Aug
We remove our eggs from the cartons, throw away the cartons, and place them in the refrigerator in a ceramic bowl. I think the egg carton design is a very old one:
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Jump to: navigation, search A filled egg carton. A carton of six eggs. This article includes a list of references, but its sources remain unclear because it has insufficient inline citations. Please help to improve thi
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@jstory07 (55920)
• Roseburg, Oregon
23 Aug
I never knew that. Thanks for sharing.
1 person likes this
• Dallas, Texas
23 Aug
I was surprised to learn of this today myself.
1 person likes this