When you get a wedding invitation........ Indian style :P

By DJ
@Daljinder (19831)
India
November 10, 2017 8:32am CST
The immediate family members and relatives are invited in person even if they live in different states, city... etc... (Although they already know about the wedding date and stuff) When you go to their home to personally invite them, you also bring something sweet as it is a happy occasion. Nowadays, there is this wedding "bhaaji" that is very common. The image 4 (outside view) and image 5 (inside view) respectively. That's "something sweet and something salty". The stuff in the middle is the sweet stuff and the stuff on either side is the salty one. Now onto the invitation: The image 1 is the outer cover and image 2 is the actual wedding invitation card. The image 3 is the inside view of the said card. The cover and the front of the card has a unique symbol- a religious one. Since this is a Sikh wedding, it's "ik onkar". The "ik" means the number "1" and "onkar" means "God". Together it means that there is one God and this is also the very first thing the Holy Scriptures, Guru Granth Sahib, of the Sikhs start with. (The only holy scriptures in my personal knowledge to start with a number yet.) The inside: The left side is the formal invitation text on behalf of the groom's mother and his late father. The bride's side invitations go on her parent's behalf in the same way. The very first invitations from both sides are given to the Guru in the Gurdwara (which literally means "the abode of the Gurus". In the west, it's called Sikh temple) by both sets of parents and then to each other. After that, the rest of the invitations are given out. The Sikh weddings are an elaborate affair with traditions that go on for a week. At the same time, they are very simple and adhere to the religious practices. The right side lists all the traditional ceremonies with date, time and venues. This wedding invite is for my cousin's wedding (my Mom's side of the family). He lives in Gwalior (Madhya Pradesh) and bride is from Delhi (North). So, all the ceremonies are going to be held ...some at Gwalior, some here in my city and some at Delhi. The wedding is in Delhi. Had nothing better to post about. Saw the invitation and thought "what the heck. Let's do this" (Image is mine and numbered. Description above in the post by number)
16 people like this
14 responses
@amadeo (47916)
• United States
10 Nov
It has been awhile in getting one of these
3 people like this
@Daljinder (19831)
• India
30 Nov
@amadeo We get them once in a while. Though, it is a last wedding in the extended family. Mom is youngest on her side of the family and Dad is the eldest on his.
@amadeo (47916)
• United States
30 Nov
@Daljinder I see thank you for this.
1 person likes this
@franxav (3728)
10 Nov
Wedding invitation cards are rather glossy in our state, esp.among Bengalis.
3 people like this
@Daljinder (19831)
• India
30 Nov
@franxav Yes, there are many varieties and designs. It's a personal choice and preference and also the Sikh ideology gives emphasis on being humble and not show off. So, that is also accounted for. Many Sikhs do go to great lengths to "show off".
@Srbageldog (5443)
• United States
11 Nov
We have a large Sikh population in my town, and I have had many Sikh neighbors over the years. Their weddings definitely were elaborate, and impressive, affairs! Thanks for sharing this info about the process of inviting people to Sikh weddings.
2 people like this
@Daljinder (19831)
• India
30 Nov
@Srbageldog You are welcome! We used to have "Hukum Nama" (the royal order) read along with the invites at bride and groom invites. But the practice has been stopped by the "Akal Takht" ( which means "the eternal throne". It is the Supreme authority of the Sikhs community where religious matters are concerned.)
1 person likes this
• United States
1 Dec
@Daljinder One time, one of our neighbors was getting married, and the bride and groom and their relatives had this parade down our street while someone played drums. The bride had this elaborate headpiece on, which was aflame (it might have had candles in it; it was a long time ago when I saw this and can't quite remember.) Is this a common practice that you could shed some light on? I have always been curious about that, whether it was part of the Sikh wedding tradition or something unique.
1 person likes this
@Daljinder (19831)
• India
3 Dec
@Srbageldog Yes, it is part of the Punjabi tradition. It is called "Jaggo" which literally means "wake up" because it is time for celebration. It marks the arrival of the maternal family of the bride to her place and maternal family of the groom to his place. It takes place separately,i.e. for a groom, it's his family at their place and for bride it is her family at her place. It usually is performed in the last hours of the night before the wedding. The maternal families on each side leaves from their place or a designated place and start walking towards the wedding home singing and dancing. The female members of the family carry the gaggery in turns during the walk. The first woman to carry the gaggery is the maternal aunt of bride and groom. Another woman carries a long decorated bamboo stick with bells. She uses this to knock on the doors and shake it so that the bells would ring to "wake up" because while they are walking towards the wedding home, they visit homes of relatives and friends that fall on their way. They are welcomed with singing and dancing. The ceremony ends with the procession reaching the wedding home. It is a loud ceremony, filled with joy, dancing, fireworks, and food. The gaggery is either of made of mud or decorated copper or brass vessel with clay lamps which are filled with mustard oil and lit or use candles or even battery lights can be used.
1 person likes this
@acelawrites (10750)
• Philippines
10 Nov
You have a nice way to invite your guests to a wedding. It takes so much time and effort to do it.
2 people like this
@Daljinder (19831)
• India
30 Nov
@acelawrites Yeah, because marriages for us means the union of two families which is actually Indian culture. Not just the bride and groom. In our language which is Punjabi for the Sikhs, we call the wedding ceremony as "Anand Karaj" which literally means "The Blissful Union" of the two souls. And during the ceremony, the vows (there are 4 and same for each Sikh couple) that are sung are not gender based either because we believe that the soul is genderless. In the Holy Scriptures, it has been codified that "Husband and wife are not the ones who sit together, walk together, sleep together, live together but husband and wife are the ones that are two bodies and one soul."
1 person likes this
@acelawrites (10750)
• Philippines
1 Dec
@Daljinder it is so meaningful and so solemn!Thanks for sharing this wedding tradition.
1 person likes this
@dodoazo (11152)
• Philippines
30 Nov
It's no different with our culture. Filipinos are preparing the wedding card layout. For those family members or relatives couldn't receive the invitation are visited personally by the bride and the groom.
2 people like this
@Daljinder (19831)
• India
30 Nov
@dodazo Interesting to know! Thank you for letting me know. I didn't know that. In our case, it's not the bride or the groom who gives out the invitations.
@Corbin5 (81577)
• United States
10 Nov
A lot of preparation and ceremony go into those wedding invitations.
2 people like this
@Daljinder (19831)
• India
30 Nov
@Corbin5 Yep! Since it is something in practice for over centuries, I guess people have gotten used to it.
1 person likes this
@sjvg1976 (14592)
• Delhi, India
10 Nov
That's what the way of ours inviting people to any ceremony. Also we give sweets to people who come to attend the ceremony when they leave after attending it.
2 people like this
@Daljinder (19831)
• India
30 Nov
@sjvg1976 Yes! Same here! ANother bhaji or sweets along with gifts to the immediate family/ friends.
1 person likes this
@Kandae11 (26926)
10 Nov
Very interesting. sweet and salty - definitely what one could expect in a marriage.
2 people like this
@Daljinder (19831)
• India
30 Nov
@Kandae11 Yeah!
@Happy2BeMe (70166)
• Canada
10 Nov
That is very interesting. I enjoy reading about the traditions of other countries.
2 people like this
@Daljinder (19831)
• India
30 Nov
@Happy2BeMe We used to have "Hukum Nama" (the royal order) read along with the invites at bride and groom invites. But the practice has been stopped by the "Akal Takht" (Spiritual authority of the Sikhs)
1 person likes this
@bluesa (12770)
• Johannesburg, South Africa
15h
, I like the look of those snacks and the invitation is so pretty, a beautiful blue. There is very detailed planning in all this.
1 person likes this
@Daljinder (19831)
• India
10h
@bluesa Yeah! One can crash after all is said and done including the wedding couple. hehe!
@jaboUK (50626)
• United Kingdom
10 Dec
That's very interesting DJ, I like learning about other countries' traditions.
1 person likes this
@Daljinder (19831)
• India
10h
@jaboUK That's from Sikh wedding traditions that makes less than 2 % of Indian population. There are plenty more in other communities. Some good some bad some totally ridiculous some hilarious. Even complete nutjob ones too.
1 person likes this
• Raurkela, India
26 Nov
Got to know a lot about Sikh wedding.
1 person likes this
@Daljinder (19831)
• India
30 Nov
@aninditasen You are welcome! Only slightly different from Hindu weddings as we have less traditional ceremonies than Hindus.
1 person likes this
@rubyriaz007 (2505)
• India
26 Nov
I feel we should not spend too much on wedding cards. I think a simple card is better. After the marriage is over people will definitely tear the card and throw.So it is waste of money spending too much on wedding cards. You can spend money on decorations, food, entertainment. I feel that is worth.
1 person likes this
@Daljinder (19831)
• India
30 Nov
@rubyria007 Totally agree with you! If I could, I would say that drop the wedding and just go get civil marriage done. Easy and painless. Or just make it a private affair where only immediate family and very close friends can attend. Saves a lot of money and time! Because to be honest, it does not matter however many guests you entertain at the weddings, they will never leave satisfied. They will complain either way!
1 person likes this
@vandana7 (57490)
• India
30 Nov
Ours is worse. We even receive gifts sort of payment to attend the wedding. One of distant cousin...(read very very distant cousin's son) got married last month. She sent dry fruits, and the usual stuff, apart from that La Opala set. Groan. Now, that is from the bride's side of course. So it does not pinch her pockets. But when we attend the function, we have to cover the cost of meals, plus cost of gifts and whatever, plus leave some surplus. It becomes a sigh affair.