When is the law not what it seems?

Northampton, England
January 9, 2018 9:34am CST
In recent years the courts in the U.K. bought in tougher jail sentences to punish, mostly men, in domestic abuse cases around relationships, marriages and the kids and stuff. No one wants to see women and kids feel unsafe around men in the family home and they should be afforded full protection by the police and courts. The move was applauded by many. But five years on nothing much has changed as the murder rate remains high in arguing couples and violence in the family on the rise. Cynics would say that by increasing jail sentences for violent men the courts and the government have actually ’discouraged’ women to come forward as much, as men tend to be the wage earners and house or tenancy holders in the family and so women and kids can end up homeless and worse off, if that’s possible, with their partner in jail for five years. Remember that men kill and hurt people through rejection and women kill the people they love. I have no doubt in my mind this legislation was pushed to reduce domestic disputes and family violence callouts that dominate police hours and responses. I say that because we are seeing the same type of disingenuous policing policy with illegal immigrants through so-called anti slavery laws pepped up here. Britain has about a million illegal immigrants, some being process or going through asylum courts, others hidden in plain sight. To me illegal’s that are working here and not claiming welfare don’t bother me as they tend to be doing crap jobs we won’t do and so have a role to play. But recently with Brexit and growing right wing anger the government have been forced to act and have started trying to deport more to be seen doing something. They are closing down those bogus colleges set up to aid illegal workers from Indian here and raiding places notorious for illegals, like those car washes, nail bar, Irish traveller caravan parks and the sex trade. The Irish gypsies do like to use slave labour and genuine targets but we also know foreign nationals use the same heinous exploitation in the vice trade. But although people are being locked up for these crimes the people they are exploiting are often deported and this new anti-slave legislation really about that, a clean legal way to remove people quickly. I personally don’t believe there are that many women exploited by the sex trade and feminist group’s just uncomfortable that some women chose to be in it over having a regular job as greater rewards but a lot of prostitutes are being sent home this way. Foreign women caught working in brothels and seen in the press tend to be ashamed over being actually being trafficked, maybe because they have a drug addiction or their families never knew. What we do know deporting people is a big vote winner and the Prime Minster needs those more than 30-year-old Afghan men from the Calais camps pretending to be 16 to stay in the U.K.
4 people like this
2 responses
@topffer (34091)
• France
9 Jan
The justice follows the change of mentalities in a population. When a law is considered like obsolete or morally wrong, it is not enforced. Speaking of immigrants, helping an immigrant in France by providing food, a bed or a place in a car was a crime since 1945 that could be sentenced by 5 years of jail, but nobody has ever been sent to jail for that. It was just morally wrong. The law has changed in 2012 to target only people asking money or work for the help given, and not those "wanting to offer for free a dignified and decent lifestyle to an immigrant." We are offering free healthcare and some help to any immigrant in France, I wonder why some are thinking that UK is a better place for them than Continental Europe.
1 person likes this
• Northampton, England
9 Jan
60% of asylum seekers in the UK, when give the right to work in the UK and so claim full welfare, are still unemployed one year later. Its abig expense
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@topffer (34091)
• France
9 Jan
@thedevilinme Maybe, but I see it more like an investment for the future, at least in countries like France and Germany where retirement pensions are paid by people at work. Without immigrants the birth rate of the native population would not permit it. Asylum seekers are not economical immigrants, and many will not stay. We noticed it in France with Chileans and Lebanese in the 1970's/1980's, quite all of them came back in their countries later. The same will happen with Syrians : the ones we have here had better jobs in their countries than the jobs we can offer them, and will leave soon or later. Merkel did an incorrect calculation with Syrians, I bet that 2/3 will be back in Syria in 5 years.
@Kandae11 (36837)
9 Jan
Two obvious reason why women remain in abusive relationships : (1) economic reasons (2) children. Those with children would feel more trapped - thankfully me and my ex didn't plan to have children until after a year or two of marriage. A good decision - because I had to escape after just two months of marriage. In any event - whether children were involved or my economic resources were limited - I would never ever stay in an abusive relationship . I would find a way somehow.
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