What the Doctor Said about My Palpitations and What's Next

God Blessing Wine Country
@bagarad (12300)
Paso Robles, California
February 14, 2018 2:33am CST
The good news is I got a good night's sleep and have had no new episodes today. I did see the doctor. He has a good sense of humor, and I like that. We went over all the data and he confirmed that my problem is electrical, not structural. My original diagnosis 40 years ago was that my palpitations were because I had mitral valve prolapse. When I moved here and changed doctors, I was finally referred to my current cardiologist in about 2005. He told me I did not have mitral valve prolapse, and he changed my medication from digoxin to metoprolol. Since October, my metoprolol dose has been changed several times because of the result of a blood test. That's when my palpitations started to get bad again. They have been controlled by medication since about 1976, when I first saw a cardiologist. My worst day back then was having an episode at work that lasted six hours. My boss drove me to the doctor who was not far away. I didn't have a cardiologist yet then. Now to today's medical appointment! The doctor answered questions I've had since the beginning. He reassured me again I did not have mitral valve prolapse. Instead I have what he called an electrical problem. He said my original diagnosis was probably given because back in those days they attributed most palpitations to mitral valve prolapse because it also causes palpitations. The doctor also said that my heart murmur has nothing to do with this. Today he decided to add digoxin to the metoprolol to see if the combination will do the trick. He said he is also referring me to an medical "electrician" - a cardiologist in their group who specializes in solving electrical problems in the heart. By the time I see her in April, we will know how the changes in the medication are working out. He said my options are control with medication or having surgery. My heart has the equivalent of a short circuit. The surgeon would cauterize the "wire" that is causing the short circuit and that should stop the problem from recurring. I'm hoping the medication will work. I really don't want heart surgery. Hospitals can be dangerous places. On the other hand, it's hard to be dependent on medications. What if the day came when I couldn't get them? If I solve the problem surgically, I could survive without the heart medications. I will have to think carefully and prayerfully about this. After leaving the doctor's office, I took a photo walk. The sky was magnificent and I visited three different wineries' vineyards, and my other house in Templeton. My battery died after taking this photo at Doce Robles Winery, so I went home to charge it so I could still take the evening sunset photos. I thought this photo relates a bit to this discussion. Can you see why?
14 people like this
11 responses
@LadyDuck (163966)
• Switzerland
14 Feb
There is the sun behind the clouds and there is a solution to almost any problem. I do not like surgery, but I also dislike taking medications. It's a hard decision to take.
2 people like this
@LadyDuck (163966)
• Switzerland
15 Feb
@bagarad It is true that only having one condition out of control is better. I also do not like a lot the idea to have surgery, but sometimes it's the best decision to take.
1 person likes this
@bagarad (12300)
• Paso Robles, California
16 Feb
@LadyDuck At least I have a month to think about it before I see the specialist.
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@LadyDuck (163966)
• Switzerland
16 Feb
@bagarad You have all the time to carefully evaluate the possible solutions.
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@AKRao24 (19780)
• India
14 Feb
I understand what he meant by electrical problem! He was referring to mace makers which triggers the heart beats...any way since you are comfortable with medication just carry on with them and be relaxed ! Have a great day and happy time dear @bagarad ! God bless!
2 people like this
@bagarad (12300)
• Paso Robles, California
14 Feb
Thanks for the encouraging words. Tomorrow will be day 1 on the new medication experiment.
2 people like this
@AKRao24 (19780)
• India
14 Feb
Don't worry dear @bagarad everything will be alright and I sincerely wish you all the best! God bless! Thanks!
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@JudyEv (126340)
• Bunbury, Australia
14 Feb
To me the rays of sunshine suggest that there is now more hope that your issues will be resolved in a more positive way. That is good news you've had today.
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@bagarad (12300)
• Paso Robles, California
14 Feb
I think it was good news, but I still have to decide whether surgery is a better option.
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@YrNemo (13412)
14 Feb
The sunrays there are wonderful, made me think of the story when God was talking to Moses on Mount Sinai.
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@bagarad (12300)
• Paso Robles, California
14 Feb
I think that must have been scary, since the people were afraid to approach the Mountain of God even seeing it from a distance. This scene seems to generate peace.
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@YrNemo (13412)
16 Feb
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@Srbageldog (8613)
• United States
16 Feb
That is a tough decision for sure. I believe the ablation surgery they perform to cauterize the "wire" causing the short circuit can be done via a minimally invasive procedure through a vein. My dad might have to have it done eventually.
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@bagarad (12300)
• Paso Robles, California
16 Feb
That's good to know. I'll try to research it.
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@andriaperry (53581)
• United States
15 Feb
Tony was on metoprolol but he still had that racing heart, sometimes up to 150 or more. Another put him on Salatol and it worked. Tony could not get his meds so he quit them. I read in the magazine "life expectations" and the findings were, by scientist, a link between low vitamin C and AFIB/ racing heart so I put him on vitamin C and no more racing heart. No more meds.
1 person likes this
@bagarad (12300)
• Paso Robles, California
15 Feb
I get lots of Vitamin C and always have. It doesn't seem to stop my problem.
@allknowing (66737)
• India
14 Feb
Hope your medication will work for you rather than going for surgery. There is no way I can relate that photo to your discussion - may be you can help (lol)
1 person likes this
@bagarad (12300)
• Paso Robles, California
15 Feb
The nurse wasn't even interested when I started to tell her about the phone.
@Corbin5 (109785)
• United States
14 Feb
Yes, give yourself some time to make a decision as to how you want to proceed. If the electrical problem can be remedied either way, all will be well.
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@bagarad (12300)
• Paso Robles, California
14 Feb
I'm thankful the monitor gave the doctor the data he needed, since the other monitor I wore was only on for 24 hours and nothing happened during that time to record.
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@AmbiePam (49557)
• United States
14 Feb
I like the photo. It looks like a lot of little spotlights. That's a lot to digest. I hope the answer becomes clear to you in prayer.
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@bagarad (12300)
• Paso Robles, California
14 Feb
I'm sure it will be made clear. Thank you.
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@prashu228 (25797)
• India
14 Feb
oh glad everything is fine, i never heard about this electrical problem, hope the medication works.
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@bagarad (12300)
• Paso Robles, California
14 Feb
So do I. Last time they changed my medications in October and started experimenting it turned my life upside down.
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• Aberdeen, North Carolina
14 Feb
I hope you get everything resolved accordingly. Wishing you good health.
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@bagarad (12300)
• Paso Robles, California
14 Feb
Thank you. I hope so, too.
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