My Help Was Not Appreciated

@MALUSE (43502)
Uzbekistan
March 6, 2018 1:42pm CST
We live in a house together with another family. They have four children. With the exception of the second child, they all had problems learning to speak properly. As No 4 has a different father, one can assume that this peculiarity is hereditary and comes from the mother's side. The German language has many words beginning with the 'sh' sound. The boy could pronounce this sound without problems but for some inexplicable reasons he didn't say it when a word begins with it. Let me explain it with English words: He didn't say 'shrub', 'shriek' and 'shredder', but 'rub', 'riek' and 'redder'. Whenever I saw him, I asked him to say 'sh' which he did. Then I asked him to say 'shrub' and he said 'rub', etc. When he was due for the first class of elementary school, he was tested by a speech therapist who was to find out if the boy could attend a normal school or a special school for children with speech deficits. The man put a knife, a fork and a spoon in front of the boy and asked him what that was. The boy wanted to make a good impression and made an effort. He had stored away that grown-ups are happy when they hear the 'sh' sound. He said, "sh-knife, sh-fork, sh-spoon". The speech therapist gawked at him. He had never heard anything like that before. He asked the boy's mother if she could explain where he had learnt these strange words. She told him that a teacher lived in their house who had practised the 'sh' sound with him. The man told her to tell this teacher - me - to stop doing this at once. He said, "We are the specialists. We know what to do. We wouldn't have to study speech therapy if everybody could do it." I can only admire these people. The boy as well as his two younger siblings attended the special school and learnt to speak perfectly. Nobody would ever suppose that they once had problems. The boy is now thirty years old and our landlord. He is married and has two daughters. The elder has problems pronouncing words properly . . . Photo: verywell.com
13 people like this
13 responses
• Cuddalore, India
6 Mar
3 people like this
@Kandae11 (40370)
6 Mar
If his daughter now has a similar problem that means the condition is hereditary. She might have to attend a special school too.
2 people like this
@MALUSE (43502)
• Uzbekistan
6 Mar
It's a strange coincidence. The daughter had problems with an ear. She was operated on when she was three years old (last year) and is now improving. She simply couldn't hear well so that she couldn't imitate well what she heard.
4 people like this
@deba12 (3099)
• India
8 Mar
I think it doesn't matter whether anyone is appreciating your deeds, unless he or she is your boss.
1 person likes this
@mydanods (6747)
• Nigeria
8 Mar
It matters. As social creatures, appreciation is like fuel.
1 person likes this
@Corbin5 (115889)
• United States
6 Mar
Those individuals do deserve admiration. It seems that the boy and his siblings were bound and determined to learn to speak perfectly and put forth a great deal of effort to do so.
1 person likes this
@NJChicaa (46162)
• United States
6 Mar
My nephew is in high school and has speech problems. For years as he was growing up, no one in the family (besides me) seemed to notice or acknowledge it. When they finally did, he was too old for them for speech to really make a difference because my nephew didn't take it seriously. It is such a shame.
@MALUSE (43502)
• Uzbekistan
6 Mar
I think such therapies have more impact with young children but they're also done with adults, for example, after accidents.
2 people like this
@NJChicaa (46162)
• United States
7 Mar
@MALUSE Yes but the person has to have the motivation to want to improve I think. My nephew doesn't think that it is important nor do his parents apparently, so it is pretty much a lost cause which is a crying shame.
@jstory07 (69876)
• Roseburg, Oregon
7 Mar
That does sound like a problem that in inherited that is passed down to every generation.
@MALUSE (43502)
• Uzbekistan
7 Mar
It's a strange coincidence. The daughter had problems with an ear. She was operated on when she was three years old (last year) and is now improving. She simply couldn't hear well so that she couldn't imitate well what she heard.
@BelleStarr (39652)
• United States
13 Mar
lol Well that man was rather a pompous one wasn't he, you were a teacher after all lol Anyway I am glad that they were able to help him to speak and that he has turned out so well
@shaggin (37733)
• United States
8 Mar
That's a cute story Glad they didn't have speech problems as they got older. A lot of times I notice kids lisp if their parents do and although it could be genetic I think it's probably just as likely they pronounce things a certain way because that show they hear it spoken all the time.
@LadyDuck (176202)
• Switzerland
7 Mar
This surely is a inherited problem that runs in the family. My husband had problem pronouncing the S, he produced a sort of hissing sound. His mother had the patient to make him repeat a series of words starting with S until the problem disappeared.
@mydanods (6747)
• Nigeria
7 Mar
In Nigeria there is a set of people, a community, that doesn't pronounce the r sound well. When they encounter it, they pronounce it as l. Main road is pronounced as main load.
7 Mar
My niece can't get the hang of the th- sound. 'There' becomes 'mer' and 'that' becomes 'mat'. It's the only sound she has issues with and she's very chatty with a vocabulary more fitting of a five year old than a three year old. I don't know at what stage it becomes a speech therapist issue though. Hopefully it won't come to that. And good on you for trying to support him ... at least you didn't do any lasting damage!
@iridion9 (10105)
• Philippines
7 Mar
Nice story. I'm thinking maybe the boy is just pretending. And perhaps he is thinking the 'sh' is gay lol
@pgntwo (22517)
• Carthage, Tunisia
6 Mar
I think sh-plaining this one is not necessary