Heroes, potatoes, pimentos, zeroes and zeros

Eugene, Oregon
June 29, 2018 6:18pm CST
These words, ending in"os" or "oes" help make the English language complicated for people to learn as a second language. It is odd to me and sort of nonsensical for the words "tomato" and "potato" to end in "oes" if there is more than one of them. Even a wino, if there are two become "winoes." The word pimento simply adds an s if there are two or more, same with avocados. Don't forget those "mementos" we like to take home either. But is you see "commandos" coming, better hide. Zero is a great one too. If you are speaking numerically, two of them are "zeroes" but if your friend has a problem, he "zeros" in on the solution. English is the only language I know. I would hate to try to learn it though. I wonder if other languages have so many inconsistencies?
12 people like this
14 responses
• Peoria, Arizona
29 Jun
I never actually realized this. Especially about zero. It was one of those things I just knew instead of actually learned in school. Why is this something we are not taught! My grammar would probably be better if elementary school cared about these things.
3 people like this
• Eugene, Oregon
29 Jun
I went to elementary school in Texas and grammart was pretty much drilled into our heads, but these oes things are still confusing. I would have never spelled two zeros with anything but an s.
2 people like this
@rakski (22098)
• Philippines
29 Jun
In reality, English is quite complicated to learn if you will follow all the rules.
2 people like this
• Eugene, Oregon
30 Jun
I know that it is. I would hate to approach it as a second language.
2 people like this
@rakski (22098)
• Philippines
30 Jun
@JamesHxstatic yes, for sure. But it is now a universal language, right so a lot more people wants to learn it
1 person likes this
• Eugene, Oregon
30 Jun
@rakski Yes, I have done some tutoring for people learning English as a second language.
@hereandthere (32790)
• Philippines
30 Jun
on thing about our language is the generic pronouns. you can say siya/sya but it can mean he/him or her/she. when you say pamangkin, it can mean nephew or niece.
2 people like this
• Eugene, Oregon
30 Jun
That sounds like fun alright. Is that Tagalog?
2 people like this
• Philippines
30 Jun
@JamesHxstatic yes. it can be helpful when you're talking in general terms
2 people like this
@mlgen1037 (29626)
• Manila, Philippines
30 Jun
Hi James. I think even our language does too. It can be really tough to understand it with the use of some words.
2 people like this
• Eugene, Oregon
30 Jun
Maybe all languages are like that, but English has to be near the top.
2 people like this
@mlgen1037 (29626)
• Manila, Philippines
30 Jun
@JamesHxstatic Oh that I agree, James.
1 person likes this
@NJChicaa (46315)
• United States
29 Jun
They say that English is one of the most difficult ones to learn. I don't know if that is just the writing aspect, though. I took 5 years of French from grade 8-12 and loved it. It wasn't practical but I loved it. I wish my parents made me take Spanish instead. I often think of doing the Rosetta Stone program to learn Spanish.
2 people like this
• Eugene, Oregon
29 Jun
Spanish would be a lot more useful. I took French in high school and college too.
2 people like this
@NJChicaa (46315)
• United States
29 Jun
@JamesHxstatic I agree. My parents just let me do my thing. My sister-in-law and brother-in-law let my nephew learn German. Like, what the hell? WHY? How would that EVER be useful in today's society in the USA unless you are planning to become a Neo-Nazi?
@allknowing (69483)
• India
30 Jun
You seem to have woken up late in the day when it comes to pointing out the oddness of the English language. Oh! I could write a book about it
1 person likes this
• Eugene, Oregon
30 Jun
Oh, I have been aware of it for many years, these are just some simple examples that baffle me as a native speaker.
1 person likes this
@allknowing (69483)
• India
30 Jun
@JamesHxstatic One does not learn English but 'mugs' it.
1 person likes this
• Eugene, Oregon
30 Jun
@allknowing Not a bad idea!
1 person likes this
@JudyEv (134905)
• Bunbury, Australia
6 Jul
I didn't know about these discrepancies. Mostly I'm a good speller. If it looks wrong I change it but that method is starting to fail as I get older.
1 person likes this
• Eugene, Oregon
6 Jul
I notice differences in spelling between England, Australia and the US that are interesting such as labour, flavour and others.
1 person likes this
@JudyEv (134905)
• Bunbury, Australia
15 Jul
@JamesHxstatic I'm afraid I always stick to 'English' spelling. Haha. but it is interesting noticing the differences.
1 person likes this
@Hannihar (42176)
5 Jul
@JamesHxstatic English is a hard language to learn. I learned Hebrew to speak here in Israel but far from fluent. It is also a hard language to learn. I am not good with languages.
1 person likes this
• Eugene, Oregon
6 Jul
I studied French in high school and college, but have forgotten most of it.
@Hannihar (42176)
6 Jul
@JamesHxstatic I also studied French in High and when I came to Israel to check it out the year before I came to live here a tour I followed the guide spoke in French and other languages but I understood him in French. I would not remember most of it anymore.
1 person likes this
@DianneN (85168)
• United States
1 Jul
Yes, indeed, English is one of the most difficult languages to learn, read, and worst of all, write. It was very difficult for my special ed students to learn those plurals, too. So happy I'm retired! Lol!
1 person likes this
• Eugene, Oregon
6 Jul
Retirement is good place to be.
1 person likes this
@DianneN (85168)
• United States
7 Jul
@JamesHxstatic I agree!!!!
1 person likes this
@just4him (127251)
• Green Bay, Wisconsin
1 Jul
I heard that the other complicated language besides ours is Mandarin with just as much oddities as we have. I'm glad I don't have to learn English too. It's complicated enough for those of us who write it. Now there's a word you really need to get right.
1 person likes this
• Eugene, Oregon
6 Jul
Oh yes, that is another tricky one.
1 person likes this
• China
30 Jun
It is really beyond me why the words ending in 'o ' have different plural forms ,which makes learning English more difficult.
1 person likes this
• Eugene, Oregon
30 Jun
It is a language mystery for certain.
1 person likes this
@marguicha (102294)
• Chile
30 Jun
I could name a lot of difficult words in English, specially as spelling goes. I have never seen a language with more "s" letters in many words. And that´s just one of the problems
1 person likes this
• Eugene, Oregon
30 Jun
Yes, ours is a language with a lot of ambiguities, difficult for non-natives (and some born here)to learn.
@Trensue (5253)
• United States
29 Jun
Is it supposed to make sense?
1 person likes this
• Eugene, Oregon
29 Jun
Would be a lot easier to learn if it did.
@simplfred (5485)
• Philippines
29 Jun
Yeah, our language is complicated to understand also.
1 person likes this
• Eugene, Oregon
6 Jul
Many languages seem to be like that.
1 person likes this