childabuse prevention

September 14, 2006 12:39am CST
how to keep your neighbors child safe without being known
1 person likes this
5 responses
@labatt113 (401)
• United States
25 Sep 06
DCYF but dont call if all you hear is yelling. DCYF is as bad as an abuser at times. Only call if you SAW something! If you hear someone yelling at their kid or two parents fighting it should not be reported to them. They come into your home and dont leave you alone. Remember after you call they will wonder who called. However do the right thing if their is abuse.
@Soul911 (37)
• United States
24 Sep 06
You did not provide enough information to comment beyond giving you the national child abuse hotline number. If you suspect abuse, use it. Your call is confidential and anonymous. 1-800-4-A-Child (1-800-422-4453).
@amiksinha (1961)
• India
24 Sep 06
abuse can be of many types, i will appreciate if u could explain the type of abuse u r talking of
• Australia
24 Sep 06
define abuse there are many forms of abuse physical mental physical abuse should not include smacking your kid no the bum mental abuse is sneaky leaves no marks or bruises all people should watch out for these kinds of abuse ido i inform local agencies whenever i see any thing out of the ordinary because i care im a foster parent i see what both kinds of abuse does too a child physically they heal but mentally they never fully heal love your kids and all those other kids out there who are less fortunate they are our future leaders
@nextgen (1888)
• India
24 Sep 06
I too agree with you, Child abuse is reported on an average of every 10 seconds and three children die every day as a result of such abuse. Sadly, Colorado has one of the highest rates of child abuse in the country. According to the National Child Abuse & Neglect Data System (NCANDS), Colorado ranks 3rd in the nation for deaths resulting from child abuse. Further compounding the problem, Colorado’s state funding to help battle child abuse ranks among the lowest in the nation. The children we serve at Tennyson Center have, on average, been in 5.8 placements outside their home. Many have been traumatized by abuse, neglect and unstable home environments. Providing these children with a safe and secure setting is essential to their healing and success. Success. Tennyson Center for Children has an impressive rate of success with the children we serve. On average, over 80% of children discharged from Tennyson Center return to safer homes within the community. An average of 75% of those children transitioned successfully into public school settings and 84% of all caseworkers, referral sources and families were satisfied or very satisfied with the services provided. The Sad Truth. Unfortunately, for every child we serve, we know there are countless more who need our help. Funding cuts have been dramatic over the course of the past decade and the money to pay for the services these children so desperately need has dwindled. Additionally, government funding does not support the full range of services necessary to assist families in providing safe, nurturing care and education for their children, or, when necessary, to develop an alternative permanency option. In 2005, only 60% of our services were covered by the Department of Human Services and the Department of Education. The rest will be covered by private donations. Together our community helps Tennyson Center provide nutritious meals, shelter, clothing, education, and counseling to some of Colorado’s most severely abused children. For many years this agency has been the “last chance” for these children, after they have experienced failure in other treatment programs or placements. We hope you will join us in giving these children that chance at a full and productive life.