The truth about tolerance

United States
December 16, 2006 6:23pm CST
Not long ago, the word 'tolerance' meant 'bearing or putting up with someone or something not especially liked'. However, now the word has been redefined to 'all values, all beliefs, all lifestyles, all truth claims are equal'. Denying this makes a person 'intolerant', and thus worthy of contempt. Where does this leave Christians? Jesus said, 'I am the way and the truth and the life. No one comes to the Father except through me' (John 14:6). And the apostle Peter said, 'It is by the name of Jesus Christ of Nazareth, whom you crucified but whom God raised from the dead … Salvation is found in no one else, for there is no other name under heaven given to men by which we must be saved' (Acts 4:10-12). The new definition of 'tolerance' makes the Christian claims to exclusivity 'intolerant', which supposedly justifies much of the anti-Christianity in the media and the education system. But this argument is glaringly illogical and self-refuting. That is, if these 'tolerance' advocates reject Christianity, then they are not treating this belief as 'equal'. So, in practice, to paraphrase George Orwell in Animal Farm, all beliefs are equal, but some beliefs are more equal than others. The result is extreme intolerance towards Christianity from people who talk so much about tolerating all views. In short, they are intolerant of intolerance, so logically they should be intolerant of themselves! The hypocrisy of the new tolerance was shown recently at two universities. At Texas Tech University (Lubbock), Michael Dini, professor of biology, said he would not recommend any students for medical school if they did not believe in evolution. Dini's university rushed to defend him on the grounds of 'academic freedom'. Contrast that with what happened at Sydney University in Australia. A number of top academics signed the following statement in a full-page student newspaper advertisement: 'On any criteria, Jesus Christ is one of the great figures of history. More than that, his claims to be the Son of God, who has made God known and taken away the sins of the world, bear up under the closest scrutiny. This is our conviction, and we urge every student to thoroughly investigate this unique figure, Jesus'. This evoked hysteria about religious intolerance and misuse of academic freedom. Some anti-Christian students even raised paranoid fears about discrimination. Yet the above statement said nothing of the kind, unlike Dini's overt intolerance and discrimination—against biblical Christians—which was happily tolerated. Author: Jonathan Sarfati of Answers in Genesis, borrowed from ChristianAnswers.net
1 person likes this
3 responses
@aggiejoe (800)
• United States
17 Dec 06
I think I'm tolerant of all religion. That is until someone tells me there religion is the only true religion and judge me for my beliefs. I am a christian and the way I see it any true christian does not judge. My question is why does people of different beliefs judge the way we believe? Thats when I become intolerant.
2 people like this
• United States
17 Dec 06
I believe the point of the author was how those who teach tolerance are actually proving that they are intolerant.
@LovingIt (5398)
• United States
17 Dec 06
Wow! That's some good information you put out there. Talk about intolerance! How is it 'academic freedom' to only recommend those who believe in evolution?
• United States
17 Dec 06
kinda contradictory huh?
• United States
17 Dec 06
can someone tell me how this discussion earned the "mature content" tag?
1 person likes this
• United States
26 Dec 06
According to the government everyone is given tolerance BUT christians, liberals are some of the most intolerant people I know these days. We must tolerate terrorists going to our universities but don't start a bible group, tolerate gay/ethnic pride symbolism but don't display any patriotic symbols, tolerate illegal aliens but can't insist on anyone learning english, frankly the whole shootin' match makes me sick.